Amelia’s Magazine | Smash & Grab @ Punk

MenomenaFandFArt.jpg
Aided in no uncertain terms by a show stopping performance at Texas’ recent South By Southwest festival, order case Portland three-piece Menomena present their debut UK release. This is in fact the bands third release – with their two previous albums available in the US exclusively. School friends Danny Seim, mind Justin Harris and Brent Knopf have derived a creative process of much interest that has resulted in a work that is both experimental and forward thinking without being inaccessible.

The bands sound is essentially a combination of looped sounds which are selected from a computer programme called Deeler. The Deeler Sessions culminate in the layering of these looped sounds and vocal addition. The good news is that for the most part this results in songs of sonic density that are out of left field but rich in melody. It is a combination that makes ‘Friend and Foe’ a compelling listen.

Often the fragmented nature of the songs will result in a messy, disjointed sound to begin with. But cohesion arises from moments of inspiration that morph abstract noises into quasi – pop melodies. It maybe a gorgeous piano line, delicate vocal harmony or obscure drum loop. Whatever, these songs keep you guessing, and aside from the odd ill judged inclusion (notably at the tail end of the album) they are nothing less than enthralling.

There are echoes of Mercury Rev on the defiant ‘Rotten Hell’, whilst howling guitars and brooding Saxophone characterise ‘Weird’. Elsewhere Menomena take ‘Up’ era REM as a reference point on ‘My My’- A brilliantly structured song defined by its paradoxical use of warm keyboards and choppy, industrial beats. It is one of many gems.

It’s a shame that the record falls away so badly in its last quarter. The final three songs appear to be an afterthought – lumped on at the end to pad things out when there really is no need for their presence. It leaves a slightly bitter taste in the mouth, but spin straight back to the start and all is forgotten. Friend and Foe deserves attention.

It’s always a danger to be overly vocal about your influences, ambulance it invariably leads people to compare you to those you have cited as inspiration, more about and with a band name taken from a Wilco song, dosage Cherry Ghost have set the bar a little too high. Thirst for Romance is positioned firmly in the folk/country influenced indie rock category and despite not being a spectacular record it has some nice moments, even if they are a little bit uninspired.

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Amelia’s Magazine | Pam Hogg: London Fashion Week A/W 2014 Catwalk Review

Pam Hogg A/W 2014 by Marina Muun

Pam Hogg A/W 2014 by Marina Muun

I thoroughly enjoyed the Pam Hogg S/S 2014 catwalk show last September, bathed as it was in a joyous theatrical atmosphere. So I was a little surprised to find that this season the Pam Hogg A/W 2014 show felt like a deflated repetition of last year, with a couple of the outfits seemingly almost identical to those shown for S/S 2014. However, it all made much more sense when, afterwards, I found out more about how and why this collection was created. In fact, Pam Hogg had opted not to show this season, but had a change of heart after a last minute personal request from Amnesty International to give a nod to Russian punk band Pussy Riot during London Fashion Week, especially as the event coincided with the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Therefore, there were only three weeks to put the collection together.

Pam Hogg A/W 2014 by Jenny Robins

Pam Hogg A/W 2014 by Jenny Robins

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A/W 2014 by Kit Wagstaff

Pam Hogg A/W 2014 by Kit Wagstaff

The show was titled COURAGE and opened with models carrying boards emblazoned with the statements “This is a dedication to Pussy Riot” and “This collection is not for sale“. The first section of the collection featured the distinctive coloured balaclavas which have become a widely-recognised symbol of the Pussy Riot girls, and was a straight dedication to the group. Pam Hogg sent ethereal bridal looks accessorised with ornate gold headpieces down the catwalk on a mixture of male, female and transexual models, perhaps in an effort to highlight the issues around gay marriage, especially in Russia. According to her, gold represents the church and white represents peace and love for everyone. The intense colours that were patchworked into her trademark catsuits were her tribute to the gay community and the richness that it has given culture.

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A/W 2014 by Mitika Suri

Pam Hogg A/W 2014 by Mitika Suri

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Pam Hogg A-W 2014 catwalk photo by Maria Papadimitriou

All photography by Maria Papadimitriou.

Categories ,A/W 2014, ,Amnesty, ,Amnesty International, ,Catwalk review, ,COURAGE, ,Fashion Scout, ,Jenny Robins, ,Kit Wagstaff, ,LGBT, ,London Fashion Week, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Mitika Chohan, ,Mitika Suri, ,Pam Hogg, ,protest, ,punk, ,pussy riot, ,Russia!, ,Sochi, ,Winter Olympics

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Presentation Review: Sibling

Holly Fulton SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

Illustration by Gemma Randall

I was so excited to see what progressive knitwear label Sibling would produce this season, viagra 40mg after featuring the brand in our menswear preview, that I legged it up the stairs to the Portico Rooms, almost tripping at the top. Such is the effect of scrambling around Somerset House to see labels that you love.

Luckily I escaped any kind of fall or serious injury. Inside the room, a large crowd had all ready formed to see what was on offer from Collection 5. Yet again Sibling had produced a quirky range of witty knits: a selection of sweaters with influences such as punk, Pop Art, and, erm, Tourettes?

Each piece offers a statement to the wearer. Large-scale polka dot patterns featured heavily in this collection, while Pop Art-esque stars appear in different scales. Static mannequins bore eery face masks, which featured a range of expletives. The highlight with Sibling is always the vibrancy of the colours – neon greens last season had this season been replaced with red and shades of blue.


Illustration by Gemma Randall

The show pieces, away from these inspired jazzy numbers, were a collaboration with zany artists Tim Noble and Sue Webster. Black jersey tracksuits had been embroidered with reflective tape to feature such profanities as ‘WANKER’ ‘SOD OFF’, C U Next Tuesday and, my personal favourite, ‘TAKE MY TITS.’ Oh, here we go again, I thought to myself…

Alongside the collection, a film by Alasdair McLellan and styled by Max Pearmain played on loop. This oozed style and featured a scallyish skinhead smoking, larking in the park and generally knocking around insalubrious areas. It was one of the best fashion films I caught this season, by far. Reminiscent of scenes from This Is England, the film was more punk than Pop Art, but it was a delight to watch. Enjoy:

SIBLING C5 film by ALASDAIR McLELLAN from SIBLING LONDON on Vimeo.

Knitwear for men can be quite elitist, with editors salivating over crew neck numbers that lack imagination. But if you’re after something with a little more punch, there ain’t anybody packing it like Sibling.

All photography by Matt Bramford

Categories ,Alisdair McLellan, ,Fashion Film, ,London Fashion Week, ,Max Pearmain, ,menswear, ,Pop Art, ,Portico Rooms, ,punk, ,S/S 2011, ,Sibling, ,Somerset House, ,Tim Noble and Sue Webster, ,Tourettes, ,Wanker

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Ashish

Ashish A/W 2011 by Erica Sharp
Ashish A/W 2011 by Erica Sharp.

Outside the BFC tent I noticed a strange character wobbling towards the entrance in huge pink platforms. It was only when she de-robed inside that I realised it was in fact Paloma Faith – dressed in a suitably over the top manner. Apparently M.I.A. was there as well, information pills pharm having provided the suitably edgy soundtrack.

Paloma Faith at Ashish by Kellie Black
Paloma Faith at Ashish by Kellie Black.

I haven’t been to an Ashish catwalk show – this despite him being amongst my very favourite designers of all time. He featured in the first ever issue of Amelia’s Magazine and I always used his clothes when I was working as a stylist. Needless to say I was very excited about attending this show…

Ashish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker
Ashish A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker.

Ashish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011 by Erica Sharp
Ashish A/W 2011 by Erica Sharp.

Ashish describes this collection as an ode to the “archetypal poor little rich girl”, sickness the kind you might find slumming it in Dalston courtesy of mum and dad, decked out in posh clothes that have seen better days. In practice this meant lots of his signature sequinned garments, oversized tartans, ripped jeans and moth eaten jumpers.

Ashish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011 by Antonia ParkerAshish A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker
Ashish A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker.

I loved the press release, replete with descriptions of a “layabout laird” who mixes “detritus with deluxe”. Hers is a London punk aesthetic thrown against Scottish Highland heritage. It’s a story that the industry can surely relate to: there’s a reason why so many people working in fashion come from the upper echelons of society. Unless you hit the big time it certainly won’t make you rich, so another source of support is often standard requirement.

Ashish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011 by Daria HlazatovaAshish A/W 2011 by Daria Hlazatova
Ashish A/W 2011 by Daria Hlazatova.

Models were expertly cast: lanky girls with greasy dip-dyed hair and bored expressions. Spiderwebs crawled across the knees. Boys wore DMs and girls sported black and white patterned brothel creepers. Statements, Teen Idle and Hard Times, were appliqued on frayed jumpers that had been attacked by killer moths. My favourite pieces were undoubtedly the supremely wearable sequinned jumper dresses, but to be honest I adored it all.

Ashish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Ashish A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Ashish A/W 2011 by Madi
Ashish A/W 2011 by Madi.

You can see more work by Erica Sharp, Antonia Parker and Kellie Black in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Antonia Parker, ,Ashish, ,BFC, ,Brothel Creepers, ,dalston, ,Daria Hlazatova, ,Erica Sharp, ,Highland, ,Jeans, ,Kellie Black, ,M.I.A, ,Madi, ,Madi Illustrates, ,MIA, ,Moths, ,paloma faith, ,punk, ,scotland, ,Somerset House, ,Spiderwebs, ,Tartan

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Jayne Pierson

Jaeger A/W 2011 by Joana Faria
Jaeger, information pills I’m afraid, diagnosis is one of those shows for which I lost the press release several weeks ago. But who needs a blurb anyway? Surely the clothes should be able to do the talking…

Jaeger, information pills a traditional fashion brand that has managed to up the fashion style stakes with in house design team shake ups. The current creative director is Stuart Stockdale, who formerly worked for Pringle of Scotland amongst others. He’s been with Jaeger for several years now, and has succeeded in reinvigorating the brand. What is it with British heritage fashion brands? They’re just so very good at reinventing themselves.

It was under the clean lights of the BFC tent that Jaeger hit the catwalk, itself all clean lines and considered tailoring. Sharp, beautifully crisp well fitting garments ploughed out to meet the photographers. I think this is what’s known as an autumnal colour range. Blocks of cinnamon, caramel, fallen leaf orange, paprika, mustard and moss gathered around punctual navy blues and sensible chocolate brown. Capacious leather bags swung or handheld clutches were the accessory of choice and the shoes were simply divine, cleverly styled with stripy woollen socks. Present and correct was the colour du jour – sharp bursts of orange red. Or on dazzling silky blouses a lip-smacking deep fuchsia pink. Yum.

This is what I would wear if I were a different kind of person: one who always looks immaculately turned out, whatever the occasion. And of course one who has a very nice steady stream of income. Working women in a certain type of job would do well to look to Jaeger for fabulous style and quality.
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Madi
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Madi.

Jaeger, viagra I’m afraid, sales is one of those shows for which I lost the press release several weeks ago. But who needs a blurb anyway? Surely the clothes should be able to do the talking…

Jaeger, a traditional fashion brand that has managed to up the fashion style stakes with in house design team shake ups. The current creative director is Stuart Stockdale, who formerly worked for Pringle of Scotland amongst others. He’s been with Jaeger for several years now, and has succeeded in reinvigorating the brand. What is it with British heritage fashion brands? They’re just so very good at reinventing themselves.

Jaeger A/W 2011 by Joana FariaJaeger A/W 2011 by Joana Faria
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Joana Faria.

It was under the clean lights of the BFC tent that Jaeger hit the catwalk, itself all clean lines and considered tailoring. Sharp, beautifully crisp well fitting garments ploughed out to meet the photographers. I think this is what’s known as an autumnal colour range. Blocks of cinnamon, caramel, fallen leaf orange, paprika, mustard and moss gathered around punctual navy blues and sensible chocolate brown. Capacious leather bags swung or handheld clutches were the accessory of choice and the shoes were simply divine, cleverly styled with stripy woollen socks. Present and correct was the colour du jour – sharp bursts of orange red. Or on dazzling silky blouses a lip-smacking deep fuchsia pink. Yum.

This is what I would wear if I were a different kind of person: one who always looks immaculately turned out, whatever the occasion. And of course one who has a very nice steady stream of income. Working women in a certain type of job would do well to look to Jaeger for fabulous style and quality.
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Madi
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Madi.

Jaeger, cure I’m afraid, about it is one of those shows for which I lost the press release several weeks ago. But who needs a blurb anyway? Surely the clothes should be able to do the talking…

Jaeger, a traditional fashion brand that has managed to up the fashion style stakes with in house design team shake ups. The current creative director is Stuart Stockdale, who formerly worked for Pringle of Scotland amongst others. He’s been with Jaeger for several years now, and has succeeded in reinvigorating the brand. What is it with British heritage fashion brands? They’re just so very good at reinventing themselves.

Jaeger A/W 2011 by Joana FariaJaeger A/W 2011 by Joana Faria
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Joana Faria.

It was under the clean lights of the BFC tent that Jaeger hit the catwalk, itself all clean lines and considered tailoring. Sharp, beautifully crisp well fitting garments ploughed out to meet the photographers. I think this is what’s known as an autumnal colour range. Blocks of cinnamon, caramel, fallen leaf orange, paprika, mustard and moss gathered around punctual navy blues and sensible chocolate brown. Capacious leather bags swung or handheld clutches were the accessory of choice and the shoes were simply divine, cleverly styled with stripy woollen socks. Present and correct was the colour du jour – sharp bursts of orange red. Or on dazzling silky blouses a lip-smacking deep fuchsia pink. Yum.

This is what I would wear if I were a different kind of person: one who always looks immaculately turned out, whatever the occasion. And of course one who has a very nice steady stream of income. Working women in a certain type of job would do well to look to Jaeger for fabulous style and quality.
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Madi
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Madi.

Jaeger, shop I’m afraid, medications is one of those shows for which I lost the press release several weeks ago. But who needs a blurb anyway? Surely the clothes should be able to do the talking…

Jaeger is a traditional brand that has managed to up the fashion style stakes with in house design team shake ups. The current creative director is Stuart Stockdale, who formerly worked for Pringle of Scotland amongst others. He’s been with Jaeger for several years now and after a prolonged period in the doldrums he has succeeded in reinvigorating the brand. What is it with British heritage fashion brands? They’re just so very good at reinventing themselves.

Jaeger A/W 2011 by Joana FariaJaeger A/W 2011 by Joana Faria
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Joana Faria.

It was under the clean lights of the BFC tent that Jaeger hit the catwalk, itself all clean lines and considered tailoring. Sharp, beautifully crisp well fitting garments ploughed out to meet the photographers. The collection was a delicious mix of autumnal colours: blocks of cinnamon, caramel, fallen leaf orange, paprika, mustard and moss gathering around punctual navy blues and sensible chocolate brown. Capacious leather bags swung or handheld clutches were the accessory of choice and the shoes were simply divine, cleverly styled with stripy woollen socks. Present and correct was the colour du jour – sharp bursts of orange red. Or on dazzling silky blouses a lip-smacking deep fuchsia pink. Yum.

This is what I would wear if I were a different kind of person: one who always looks immaculately turned out, whatever the occasion. And of course one who has a very nice steady stream of income. Working women in a certain type of job would do well to look to Jaeger for fabulous style and quality that won’t go out of fashion in a hurry.
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

For Jayne Pierson I raced into town alone – yet another early morning show for which we only had one ticket, cheap enticingly printed on pearly grey paper. This despite a very nice mention of our support in the accompanying press release – thankyou whoever thought to mention us, approved it’s appreciated! We did in fact catch up with Jayne just prior to her show, and you can read the interview here. The invite and goodie bag were not, however, an indicator of a colourful show but rather the favoured shade of make-up. Kingdom of Shadows began on a black note and carried on in the same vein, broken up only by a curious grey and beige striped taffeta that is something of a Pierson signature but would not have looked out of place on curtains or a sofa in a certain type of house.

Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme
Jayne Pierson’s Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme.

Jayne Pierson formerly worked in the music business and this show felt deeply imbued with the remnants of an 80s rock sensibility. A gothic Victorian kind of rock, with swaggering shoulders and bunched bustle skirts. The models sported messy up dos, pallid faces with lilac lips and pin sharp shapely heels. Black tailored jackets featured inset patent fabric shoulders and cuffs, leather minidresses cowl-necked atop rubberised leggings. The sudden introduction of striped silk was balanced with patent detailing on collar, waist and cuffs – a jaunty pillbox hat set askance.

Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson by Laura Mullins
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Laura Mullins.

Devore lacy velvet also made an appearance, not to mention a terribly racy see through crop top and leggings. I particularly liked the large but lightly draped silver jewellery by Fiona Paxton, who fuses Indian artisanship with a British punk sensibility and Bauhaus design. A corseted jumpsuit that hit the catwalk in a tipsy fashion was less desirable: the poor dresser must have got a shafting but I blame the model’s lack of boobs. What’s the point of a shaped bodice if there’s nothing to put in it?

Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Jayne took her bow on the catwalk accompanied by a celebrity model – which no one knew. I had to check in with the PR to find out who she was but I can’t for the life of me remember – apparently she was a Welsh singer.

Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

There were some beautiful ideas in Kingdom of Shadows; especially the strong shoulders and nipped in waists that recalled my fondest decade, the 80s. And I adored the carefully constructed bustle dress that bore the influence of Jayne’s time with Vivienne Westwood. But yet again there was all that pesky black, which will never ever be my favourite fashion colour. Here’s hoping that next season might see the reintroduction of colour again. Go on Jayne, please!

Categories ,80s, ,bauhaus, ,Ellie Sutton, ,Fiona Paxton, ,gothic, ,Indian, ,Jayne Pierson, ,Kerri-Ann Hulme, ,Kingdom of Shadows, ,Laura Mullins, ,onoff, ,punk, ,Victorian, ,Vivienne Westwood

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Charlie Le Mindu (by Katie)


Illustration by Andrea Peterson, order aka Artist Andrea

Charlie Le Mindu’s ‘Berlin Syndrome’ catwalk show was packed with journalists, photographers and front row candy like Daphne Guinness and Diane Pernet, lots of people were left outside, disappointed. Such is the draw of the promise of nudity.


Photography by Katie Antoniou

And Charlie didn’t let us down- first up on the catwalk was a naked model drenched in fake blood, wearing only a headpiece adorned with the word ‘Violence’. Profound, eh? The ‘Carrie’ theme ran through the whole show, with a number of the pieces being blood-splattered or drenched, a gimmick I’d have got pretty bored of if it weren’t for the nod to second world war Berlin. Vintage style lace and lots of military influences from gasmarks to metal cases meant that my interest was definitely peeked. Some of this stuff WAS wearable- have a look at this fantastic robe.

The shoes were a result of a collaboration between Charlie and Underground Shoes, I’m really disappointed that I didn’t get a better picture of any of them, because they were fantastic; stunning platforms covered in lace and Charlie’s signature hair.


Beginning life as a hairdresser, Charlie has gone on to work human hair into his clothing designs, now worn by the likes of Lady Gaga. In this show, hair fringing was often daubed in Graffiti, as were the model’s own hairstyles.


Illustration by Artist Andrea

The return of a darkly rebellious nod to the Punk era was evident in a number of shows this year, evidence of the current economic climate, dissatisfaction with the government; certainly Charlie was out to shock, provoke and disturb, with the final walk through set to a soundtrack of pigs being slaughtered. Whilst maintaining his artistic integrity, I do think Charlie was thinking of potential buyers when he designed this collection, as a lot of it is much more wearable than his previous pieces, despite the avant garde presentation. Get ready to see these looks on many a celeb; though probably without the fake blood.


Illustration by Artist Andrea

Andrea Peterson created the wonderful front cover for Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,Andrea Peterson, ,Artist Andrea, ,Charlie le Mindu, ,Daphne Guinness, ,Diane Pernet, ,Hair, ,LFW A/W 2011, ,Nudity, ,punk, ,Violence

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Ashish

Ashish A/W 2011 by Erica Sharp
Ashish A/W 2011 by Erica Sharp.

Outside the BFC tent I noticed a strange character wobbling towards the entrance in huge pink platforms. It was only when she de-robed inside that I realised it was in fact Paloma Faith – dressed in a suitably over the top manner. Apparently M.I.A. was there as well, information pills pharm having provided the suitably edgy soundtrack.

Paloma Faith at Ashish by Kellie Black
Paloma Faith at Ashish by Kellie Black.

I haven’t been to an Ashish catwalk show – this despite him being amongst my very favourite designers of all time. He featured in the first ever issue of Amelia’s Magazine and I always used his clothes when I was working as a stylist. Needless to say I was very excited about attending this show…

Ashish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker
Ashish A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker.

Ashish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011 by Erica Sharp
Ashish A/W 2011 by Erica Sharp.

Ashish describes this collection as an ode to the “archetypal poor little rich girl”, sickness the kind you might find slumming it in Dalston courtesy of mum and dad, decked out in posh clothes that have seen better days. In practice this meant lots of his signature sequinned garments, oversized tartans, ripped jeans and moth eaten jumpers.

Ashish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011 by Antonia ParkerAshish A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker
Ashish A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker.

I loved the press release, replete with descriptions of a “layabout laird” who mixes “detritus with deluxe”. Hers is a London punk aesthetic thrown against Scottish Highland heritage. It’s a story that the industry can surely relate to: there’s a reason why so many people working in fashion come from the upper echelons of society. Unless you hit the big time it certainly won’t make you rich, so another source of support is often standard requirement.

Ashish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011 by Daria HlazatovaAshish A/W 2011 by Daria Hlazatova
Ashish A/W 2011 by Daria Hlazatova.

Models were expertly cast: lanky girls with greasy dip-dyed hair and bored expressions. Spiderwebs crawled across the knees. Boys wore DMs and girls sported black and white patterned brothel creepers. Statements, Teen Idle and Hard Times, were appliqued on frayed jumpers that had been attacked by killer moths. My favourite pieces were undoubtedly the supremely wearable sequinned jumper dresses, but to be honest I adored it all.

Ashish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAshish A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Ashish A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Ashish A/W 2011 by Madi
Ashish A/W 2011 by Madi.

You can see more work by Erica Sharp, Antonia Parker and Kellie Black in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Antonia Parker, ,Ashish, ,BFC, ,Brothel Creepers, ,dalston, ,Daria Hlazatova, ,Erica Sharp, ,Highland, ,Jeans, ,Kellie Black, ,M.I.A, ,Madi, ,Madi Illustrates, ,MIA, ,Moths, ,paloma faith, ,punk, ,scotland, ,Somerset House, ,Spiderwebs, ,Tartan

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Amelia’s Magazine | Fashion Philosophy Fashion Week Poland S/S 2012 in Łódź: Monika Ptaszek

Monika-Ptaszek-Polish-Fashion-Week-by-Antonia-Parker
Monika Ptaszek S/S 2012 by Antonia Parker.

One of my very favourite collections at Fashion Week Poland this time around came courtesy of Monika Ptaszek, who showed a menswear collection that mashed together a variety of eclectic styles to great effect. Think teddyboy meets punk meets rave meets grunge: the final effect was the epitome of Polish style when it’s done right.

Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek S/S 2012. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Models came with serious attitude, sporting impressive quiffs and pouting with great intent at the end of the catwalk. Androgynous elements such as lace swing tops, swirly sheer leggings and bespoke brocade shoes sat together easily with manly studded details on sleeves and cropped tartan jackets. Colourful floral prints and patchwork hoods were accessorised with chunky woven scarves. I spoke with Monika Ptaszek afterwards at her stand, and was intrigued to discover that her last collection was entirely black. For S/S 2012 she cites the metropolitan man who roams Paris as her ideal customer, and I can well imagine him wearing Ptaszek for Men. Loved it.

Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory

And not forgetting the fabulous brocade shoes:

Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Monika Ptaszek Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory

Categories ,80s, ,Antonia Parker, ,Brocade, ,Fashion Philosophy Fashion Week Poland, ,gay, ,grunge, ,Lodz, ,menswear, ,Metropolitan, ,Monika Ptaszek, ,paris, ,Patchwork, ,Ptaszek for Men, ,punk, ,rave, ,Teddyboy

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Amelia’s Magazine | Central Saint Martins: Ba Fashion Graduate Show 2011 review, the winners

Flaminia Saccucci by Laura Warecki
Flaminia Saccucci by Laura Warecki.

Central Saint Martins showed for the last time at York Hall on Tuesday 31st May. I sat next to someone from L’Oreal – the principle course sponsors who fund the yearly awards show. There’s no wonder that Central Saint Martins fashion students are able to put on a professional standard graduate show, case what with the huge amount of monetary help that the course attracts. But there’s a reason why Central Saint Martins attracts the cash – the standard of design on show for 2011 was unremittingly high and in the next few blog posts I’ll pick out my favourites from an extremely talented bunch. First up, malady though – the winners.

Momo Wang by Karolina Burdon
Momo Wang by Karolina Burdon.

Momo Wang was the very deserving joint second runner up in an awards ceremony presented by Hilary Alexander and delivered by Meadham Kirchhoff and Sarah Burton. Or as Hilary put it: “You know Sarah; wedding dress, Pippa Middleton’s bum, need I say more?

Central Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Momo Wang. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Momo Wang. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Momo Wang. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Momo Wang. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Momo Wang. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Momo Wang. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Momo Wang. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Momo Wang. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Momo Wang. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Momo Wang. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Momo Wang. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Momo Wang. All photography by Amelia Gregory

Her playful print presentation featured smiling girls with pigtails and balloons, bubble machines, dragon headgear and a mish mash of tribal influences thrown together in a unique and inspiring way. Super talented and with a refreshing take on the typical catwalk show.

Ivan Curia Nunes by Gareth A Hopkins
Ivan Curia Nunes by Gareth A Hopkins.

Central Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Ivan Curia Nunes. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Ivan Curia Nunes. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Ivan Curia Nunes. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Ivan Curia Nunes. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Ivan Curia Nunes. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Ivan Curia Nunes.

Ivan Curia Nunes also came joint second, with his stylish sandy menswear, definitely one of the most instantly wearable collections on the catwalk.

Central Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Nicholas Aburn. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Nicholas Aburn. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Nicholas Aburn. Photography by Amelia GregoryNicholas-Aburn-by-Victoria-Haynes
Nicholas Aburn by Victoria Haynes.

I hadn’t been so impressed with the cutting in Nicholas Aburn‘s collection, but maybe the first runner up was just unlucky enough to have been lumbered with the most gargantuan models in the show.

Central Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Nicholas Aburn. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Nicholas Aburn. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Nicholas Aburn.

He completely won me over by the time he had walked to the end of the catwalk, smiling like a little imp as the models towered over him in their 80s influenced tailored striping and printed outfits, topped off with some eye-catching wide rimmed hats.

Central Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Flaminia Saccucci. Photography by Amelia GregoryFlaminia-Saccucci-by-Rebecca-Elves
Flaminia Saccucci by Rebecca Elves.

First prize went to Flaminia Saccucci, who showed an extremely confident and unusual latex printed floral collection in shades of pink, green and yellow featuring tyre printed legs that continued racing over waistlines and across bosoms.

Central Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Flaminia Saccucci. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Flaminia Saccucci. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Flaminia Saccucci. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Flaminia Saccucci. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Flaminia Saccucci. Photography by Amelia GregoryCentral Saint Martins Ba Show 2011-Flaminia Saccucci. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Flaminia Saccucci.

Sadly none of these students appears to have a website. Since this is a gripe that I fear I may have to repeat far too often over the next few weeks I’ll say it just this once during my reports from the Central Saint Martins show. Pffffff.

My next blog will be online soon because there was plenty more to get excited about from 40 graduating students.

Categories ,80s, ,Awards, ,Central Saint Martins, ,CSM, ,Flaminia Saccucci, ,florals, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Gareth Hopkins, ,Graduate Shows, ,Hilary Alexander, ,Ivan Curia Nunes, ,Karolina Burdon, ,L’Oreal, ,Laura Warecki, ,Meadham Kirchhoff, ,Meadham Kirchoff, ,menswear, ,Momo Wang, ,Pippa Middleton, ,print, ,Rebecca Elves, ,Sarah Burton, ,Tribal, ,Victoria Haynes, ,York Hall

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Amelia’s Magazine | Fashion Philosophy Fashion Week Poland A/W 2011 in Łódź: MMC Studio Design

MMC-Design-Studio-Poland-fashion-week-by-Maria-del-Carmen-Smith
MMC Studio Design by Maria del Carmen Smith.

MMC Studio Design featured yet more draped grey jersey, for sale this time accessorised with red foreheads and high ponytails. The show opened, more about for some inexplicable reason, more about with lines of *normal* people straddling the catwalk in rows, faces smeared in black.

MMC Design Studio ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011

I liked the soundtrack, which veered from David Bowie’s Suffragette City, through to punk and grimecore. There was a caplet, splashes of lime green, interesting styling in the form of puffed out bags carried under arms and a vile shaggy matted gilet over nappy pants.

MMC Design Studio ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia Gregory

The final model warranted a gold headband (possibly famous? later spotted on the front row, forehead still golden) At the end the models and real people dodged and weaved along the catwalk. My notes say Less is More.

MMC Design Studio ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryMMC Design Studio ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryMMC Design Studio ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryMMC Design Studio ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryMMC Design Studio ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryMMC Design Studio ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryMMC Design Studio ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryMMC Design Studio ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryMMC Design Studio ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryMMC Design Studio ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryMMC Design Studio ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryMMC Design Studio ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryMMC Design Studio ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryMMC Design Studio ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryMMC Design Studio ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,David Bowie, ,Designers’ Avenue, ,Expo, ,Fashion Philosophy Fashion Week Poland, ,Gold, ,Grimecore, ,Lime, ,Lodz, ,Maria del Carmen Smith, ,MMC Design Studio, ,MMC Studio Design, ,poland, ,punk, ,Suffragette City

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