Amelia’s Magazine | Teatum Jones: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Catwalk Review

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Anna Higgie

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Anna Higgie

Away from the busy rush of Somerset House, away from the mobs of photographers, willing subjects and flashing lights, Teatum Jones chose to retreat to a secret room behind large wood-panelled doors. This wasn’t any room, but the official personal office of Arthur Liberty himself, which still retains the charm of it’s original design. Completely hidden away from the public in the Mock Tudor labyrinth that is Liberty, I was directed down a panelled hall before reaching the beautiful presentation Teatum Jones had prepared.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum_88
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

One thing I have loved doing this London Fashion Week is talking to design duos. There is something incredibly sweet about how each designer will talk about the other when you interview them, complimenting them endlessly. As soon as I entered the room, I was introduced to Rob Jones, who immediately beamed when he heard I was reviewing the presentation for Amelia’s Magazine. After giving his thanks to the Amelia’s Magazine team for all the continued support and gorgeous illustrations from the last review, he began to talk me through the intriguing collection.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

These Ravensbourne College of Design and Central Saint Martin’s graduates began to work together due to their mutual love for escapism and the power of a story, which is how this collection began. Rob Jones described how they start with a ‘screenplay’ when working on a collection, and this one began from looking at the menacing and dark qualities to fairytales. ‘I found it interesting that stories we read to children deal with such dark and frightening themes. It made me think about how I’d react if a fairytale was re-told in a newspaper today, would I see it differently?Rob Jones and Catherine Teatum were drawn to the mix of innocence and frighteningly dark folklore, wanting to explore the underlying beauty in something considered traditionally sinister.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

I was immediately drawn to the intricate prints, swirling with dark reds, bright pinks and forest greens, highlighted with touches of neon. Rob Jones and Catherine Teatum pointed out how these beautiful floral-like patterns were actually cut-up crime scene photography from the 1940’s. I was immediately surprised, which I couldn’t hide. Really? But they were such beautiful prints… suddenly I saw the numbered markers police use for blood spatters, dropped weapons, or worse. The thought sunk in…and it made sense. In a strange way, it felt nice to know, like being let in on a secret or the thrill of when the murderer almost catches someone in a horror movie. In order to place such a dark theme on clothing in a lighter way, a harlequin diamond pattern was used instead of simply overlaying the imagery.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Andy Bumpus

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Andy Bumpus

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Andy Bumpus

Other items of clothes glittered and shimmered, almost like childhood dress-up clothes, or to mimic the magic of fairytales and shining sweets like that shown in the film created for the collection, currently showing on the Teatum Jones website. Although several mannequins displayed the collection in the centre of the room, it wasn’t until I saw the models that I noticed that most of the clothing had large pockets, even in the more formal dresses. One of the models commented on how relaxed she felt, resting her hands in the silk pockets of her neon yellow dress.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

This team have found a perfect niche for womenswear that is considered and subtle, yet attention-grabbing. Alluring without being obvious. The midi length of the dresses and nipped-in light fabrics allow the wearer to be feminine in a relaxed way. It’s clear that the Teatum Jones woman is at ease with herself, a modern-day enchantress with a penchant for neon, skilled design and something a little wickedly different. The warm and positive outlook of these designers created an unforgettable London Fashion Week presentation experience; a drop of magical escapism from the busy London Fashion Week storm.

All photography by Alia Gargum

Categories ,Alia Gargum, ,Amelia’s Magazine, ,Andy Bumpus, ,Anna Higgie, ,Catherine Teatum, ,Duo, ,Fairytale, ,Fashion films, ,Forests, ,graduates, ,Horror Films, ,Innocence, ,Liberty of London, ,London Fashion Week A/W 2012, ,mock tudor, ,Neon, ,photography, ,print, ,Rob Jones, ,Silks, ,sinister, ,Teatum Jones, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Matthew Williamson Exhibition Review


Illustration by Mina Bach

When Flo and I waltzed into Somerset House on a sunny Saturday afternoon, web nurse we were shivering with excitement. An entire exhibition devoted to Matthew Williamson, the King of boho chic? The man who practically invented Sienna Miller’s wardrobe, and garnered serious fashion kudos for bringing a rich, India inspired palette of colours onto the catwalk after years of nineties minimalism? We braced ourselves for a carnival of colour, with endless displays of amazing outfits, and sketchbooks of his designs to drool over.

How wrong we were. The exhibition is free, which should have been a sign it wasn’t going to match up to the epic Victor and Rolf exhibition at the Barbican way back in 2008. Based on the coffee-table tome published by Rizzoli, the show is basically an extension of the book – a couple of blown up photos from across Williamson’s career, some choice quotes from admirers in the fashion industry, and one or two sketches and backstage snaps thrown in for good measure. Quotes came from all the usual suspects: Anna Wintour, Alexandra Shulman and Lucy Yeomans all sing his praises on typed plaques alongside the photos. One of the more interesting observations made by Wintour was her admiration of Williamson’s ability to understand lifestyle as well as style when designing his collections. Comparisons to Celia Birtwell and Zandra Rhodes followed and I think that it would have been great if more had been made of the quotes and the points they made.

All very nice – but with the book splayed out on a sofa for you to flick through, we couldn’t help feeling slightly cheated by the whole thing. Granted, it’s cheaper than buying the book, and the photos do look lovely on the walls – it was fun to see his first catwalk show with all the ‘supers’ lined up in a row, and there are some nice personal shots too – but it took us about five minutes to walk around the whole thing. We left feeling none the wiser as to what makes Matthew tick (more what other people think make him tick). Where was the back story behind his collections, or better still, samples of the clothes themselves? I can’t afford a Matthew Williamson dress, so to just catch a glimpse of his archive would have been nice.Compare that to Viktor & Rolf, where we were treated to a giant room of eerie dolls wearing every single collection they had designed, with the crazy design concepts explained, and videos of the finished look on the catwalk. Pure fashion escapism.

It just seemed that with this exhibition, there was a missed opportunity. I just hope the Dior Fashion Illustration show at Somerset House fares better!.That’s £6 to get into so hopefully the money will go to making the exhibition feel like more of an planned project rather than a marketing tool for the book. So for a window into Williamson’s world of bohemian glam – buy the book – and if you don’t want to fork out forty quid, do go and see the exhibition. Also, If you do, we spotted many autographed copies of the book in the exhibition shop looking rather lonely…

Categories ,Central Saint Martins, ,fashion, ,fashion exhibition, ,Gallery, ,london, ,london designer, ,Matthew Williamson, ,menswear, ,museum, ,photography, ,review, ,Somerset House, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Prangsta Costumiers – In Pictures

large_Caitlin_Rose

Illustrations by Emma Black

In a genre steeped in tradition, seek Caitlin Rose springs forth like a breath of fresh air. Stripped down to the sweetest bare essentials, her voice rings clear and true, especially when she sings (at times wistfully, often defiantly) about heartbreak and failed relationships. Case in point: Learning To Ride, the opening track of her new album Own Side Now paints a painfully raw snapshot of a first love; “When I was young I used to ride the wild ones, they were lots of fun but they almost took my life. Now all I need is a simple steed, to take me where I need without putting up a fight.”

But while she is a very much a modern girl; smart, opinionated and droll, she is never mocking of her beloved Country music. “I hate a lot of words” she declares in a short video bio of her; eyes shaded by Ray Bans as she stands in front of her place of work, Bobby’s Dairy Dip. She runs through the words in question…. I hate the word “Indie”, and I hate the word ‘Contemporary’…. I hate a lot of words, but ‘Country’s’ a word that I actually really like”.

The popularity of her debut album, “Own Side Now” has meant that a few one off dates have morphed into a full European tour and she draws her summer of English festival appearances to a close with a performance at The End Of The Road Festival on September 11th.

What can we expect from your new album, Own Side Now? Am I right in thinking that it is going to be less acoustic than your debut EP?
It’s a full band record. There’s a pretty stripped down cut of Sinful Wishing Well though.

How did you make your first start into the Nashville music scene? Can you remember your first gig?
My first show was at a pool party and I was 16. I was too nervous to finish any of the songs.
For a time after that I opened shows for my then-boyfriend’s angry suburban punk band. We broke up and he got all the friends so I had to make new ones. Luckily I met some cool people and a few thought I was a decent songwriter. I used to play a dive called the Springwater and whatever anyone else would throw at me. I wasn’t 21 so I took what I could get.

Country music has passed so much of Britian by, it’s almost criminal. If you were to hand pick a record collection for someone who knew nothing about country music, what records would you put in?
How big? I’d suggest a Merle Haggard Greatest Hits album, some Loretta Lynn, John Prine’s first two albums. Marty Robbin’s Gunfighter Ballads. “Our Mother the Mountain” by Townes Van Zandt.
Guy Clark’s “Old No 1″. As much George Jones as possible. Gram Parsons “GP”. Any of Dolly’s old records. Some essential Patsy Cline. “Hank Williams sings Kaw-Liga and other Funny Songs” is a good one too. Some Carter Family. The Louvin Brother’s “Satan is Real” and throw in a couple of Linda Ronstadt’s early records for appropriate country rock measure. Early Tanya Tucker is good too.
I could go on, but that’s already a lot. Country music’s all about the song. If you see a record and you think you might like it, buy it (especially if it’s cheap) and figure out your favorite song. That’s the funnest part.

Can you tell us 5 things that we don’t know about Caitlin Rose?
I sleep on cowboy sheets.

I collect talismans and other people’s I.D.’s.

I’m no good with numbers.

I’m a terrible cook.

I’ve had 5 cavities.

Your songs are already known for being pretty straight talking; are you as straight talking in your day to day life?
Not as much as I would like to be.

If Amelia’s Magazine were to come visit you in Nashville (if you would have us!), what would we get up to?
I’d show you the Country Music Hall of Fame, Webb Pierce’s guitar shaped swimming pool and Dino’s Bar & Grill on Gallatin Road. I’ve also been hearing a lot about amateur wrestling matches held at a hotel downtown, that sound pretty intriguing.

You have already had some pretty major accomplishments in your career; what have been some of the highlights so far for you?
Bonnaroo and the review in German Rolling Stone were both exciting.

I loved the YouTube video of you by Seth Graves; do you still work at Bobbys Dairy Dip? It would be so cool if you do, but I’m thinking that with your music career going stratospheric it’s left little time for anything else.
No, but I miss it a lot, especially the sweet potato fries.

What would you like to have achieved by the time you are 30? (professionally, and personally)?
A few really good albums, a solid band and the cover of the Rolling Stone.
Also, to be completely free of anything resembling a zit or a pimple for the rest of my life. Kids are cool too.

Am I the first person to tell you that your songs give me goose bumps? (I write this in a non-creepy way, I promise you!)
If you’re worried about sounding creepy then I’m worried about sounding arrogant by saying that you’re not the first.


Illustrations by Emma Block

In a genre steeped in tradition, information pills Caitlin Rose springs forth like a breath of fresh air. Stripped down to the sweetest bare essentials, pills her voice rings clear and true, viagra 60mg especially when she sings (at times wistfully, often defiantly) about heartbreak and failed relationships. Case in point: Learning To Ride, the opening track of her new album Own Side Now paints a painfully raw snapshot of a first love; “When I was young I used to ride the wild ones, they were lots of fun but they almost took my life. Now all I need is a simple steed, to take me where I need without putting up a fight.”

But while she is a very much a modern girl; smart, opinionated and droll, she is never mocking of her beloved Country music. “I hate a lot of words” she declares in a short video bio of her; eyes shaded by Ray Bans as she stands in front of her place of work, Bobby’s Dairy Dip. She runs through the words in question…. I hate the word “Indie”, and I hate the word ‘Contemporary’…. I hate a lot of words, but ‘Country’s’ a word that I actually really like”.

The popularity of her debut album, “Own Side Now” has meant that a few one off dates have morphed into a full European tour and she draws her summer of English festival appearances to a close with a performance at The End Of The Road Festival on September 11th.

What can we expect from your new album, Own Side Now? Am I right in thinking that it is going to be less acoustic than your debut EP?
It’s a full band record. There’s a pretty stripped down cut of Sinful Wishing Well though.

How did you make your first start into the Nashville music scene? Can you remember your first gig?
My first show was at a pool party and I was 16. I was too nervous to finish any of the songs.
For a time after that I opened shows for my then-boyfriend’s angry suburban punk band. We broke up and he got all the friends so I had to make new ones. Luckily I met some cool people and a few thought I was a decent songwriter. I used to play a dive called the Springwater and whatever anyone else would throw at me. I wasn’t 21 so I took what I could get.

Country music has passed so much of Britian by, it’s almost criminal. If you were to hand pick a record collection for someone who knew nothing about country music, what records would you put in?
How big? I’d suggest a Merle Haggard Greatest Hits album, some Loretta Lynn, John Prine’s first two albums. Marty Robbin’s Gunfighter Ballads. “Our Mother the Mountain” by Townes Van Zandt.
Guy Clark’s “Old No 1″. As much George Jones as possible. Gram Parsons “GP”. Any of Dolly’s old records. Some essential Patsy Cline. “Hank Williams sings Kaw-Liga and other Funny Songs” is a good one too. Some Carter Family. The Louvin Brother’s “Satan is Real” and throw in a couple of Linda Ronstadt’s early records for appropriate country rock measure. Early Tanya Tucker is good too.
I could go on, but that’s already a lot. Country music’s all about the song. If you see a record and you think you might like it, buy it (especially if it’s cheap) and figure out your favorite song. That’s the funnest part.

Can you tell us 5 things that we don’t know about Caitlin Rose?
I sleep on cowboy sheets.

I collect talismans and other people’s I.D.’s.

I’m no good with numbers.

I’m a terrible cook.

I’ve had 5 cavities.

Your songs are already known for being pretty straight talking; are you as straight talking in your day to day life?
Not as much as I would like to be.

If Amelia’s Magazine were to come visit you in Nashville (if you would have us!), what would we get up to?
I’d show you the Country Music Hall of Fame, Webb Pierce’s guitar shaped swimming pool and Dino’s Bar & Grill on Gallatin Road. I’ve also been hearing a lot about amateur wrestling matches held at a hotel downtown, that sound pretty intriguing.

You have already had some pretty major accomplishments in your career; what have been some of the highlights so far for you?
Bonnaroo and the review in German Rolling Stone were both exciting.

I loved the YouTube video of you by Seth Graves; do you still work at Bobbys Dairy Dip? It would be so cool if you do, but I’m thinking that with your music career going stratospheric it’s left little time for anything else.
No, but I miss it a lot, especially the sweet potato fries.

What would you like to have achieved by the time you are 30? (professionally, and personally)?
A few really good albums, a solid band and the cover of the Rolling Stone.
Also, to be completely free of anything resembling a zit or a pimple for the rest of my life. Kids are cool too.

Am I the first person to tell you that your songs give me goose bumps? (I write this in a non-creepy way, I promise you!)
If you’re worried about sounding creepy then I’m worried about sounding arrogant by saying that you’re not the first.


Illustrations by Emma Block

In a genre steeped in tradition, thumb Caitlin Rose springs forth like a breath of fresh air. Stripped down to the sweetest bare essentials, see her voice rings clear and true, viagra especially when she sings (at times wistfully, often defiantly) about heartbreak and failed relationships. Case in point: Learning To Ride, the opening track of her new album Own Side Now paints a painfully raw snapshot of a first love; “When I was young I used to ride the wild ones, they were lots of fun but they almost took my life. Now all I need is a simple steed, to take me where I need without putting up a fight.”

But while she is a very much a modern girl; smart, opinionated and droll, she is never mocking of her beloved Country music. “I hate a lot of words” she declares in a short video bio of her; eyes shaded by Ray Bans as she stands in front of her place of work, Bobby’s Dairy Dip. She runs through the words in question…. I hate the word “Indie”, and I hate the word ‘Contemporary’…. I hate a lot of words, but ‘Country’s’ a word that I actually really like”.

The popularity of her debut album, Own Side Now has meant that a few one off dates have morphed into a full European tour and she draws her summer of English festival appearances to a close with a performance at The End Of The Road Festival on September 11th.

What can we expect from your new album, Own Side Now? Am I right in thinking that it is going to be less acoustic than your debut EP?
It’s a full band record. There’s a pretty stripped down cut of Sinful Wishing Well though.

How did you make your first start into the Nashville music scene? Can you remember your first gig?
My first show was at a pool party and I was 16. I was too nervous to finish any of the songs.
For a time after that I opened shows for my then-boyfriend’s angry suburban punk band. We broke up and he got all the friends so I had to make new ones. Luckily I met some cool people and a few thought I was a decent songwriter. I used to play a dive called the Springwater and whatever anyone else would throw at me. I wasn’t 21 so I took what I could get.

Country music has passed so much of Britian by, it’s almost criminal. If you were to hand pick a record collection for someone who knew nothing about country music, what records would you put in?
How big? I’d suggest a Merle Haggard Greatest Hits album, some Loretta Lynn, John Prine’s first two albums. Marty Robbin’s Gunfighter Ballads. “Our Mother the Mountain” by Townes Van Zandt.
Guy Clark’s “Old No 1″. As much George Jones as possible. Gram Parsons “GP”. Any of Dolly’s old records. Some essential Patsy Cline. “Hank Williams sings Kaw-Liga and other Funny Songs” is a good one too. Some Carter Family. The Louvin Brother’s “Satan is Real” and throw in a couple of Linda Ronstadt’s early records for appropriate country rock measure. Early Tanya Tucker is good too.
I could go on, but that’s already a lot. Country music’s all about the song. If you see a record and you think you might like it, buy it (especially if it’s cheap) and figure out your favorite song. That’s the funnest part.

Can you tell us 5 things that we don’t know about Caitlin Rose?
I sleep on cowboy sheets.

I collect talismans and other people’s I.D.’s.

I’m no good with numbers.

I’m a terrible cook.

I’ve had 5 cavities.

Your songs are already known for being pretty straight talking; are you as straight talking in your day to day life?
Not as much as I would like to be.

If Amelia’s Magazine were to come visit you in Nashville (if you would have us!), what would we get up to?
I’d show you the Country Music Hall of Fame, Webb Pierce’s guitar shaped swimming pool and Dino’s Bar & Grill on Gallatin Road. I’ve also been hearing a lot about amateur wrestling matches held at a hotel downtown, that sound pretty intriguing.

You have already had some pretty major accomplishments in your career; what have been some of the highlights so far for you?
Bonnaroo and the review in German Rolling Stone were both exciting.

I loved the YouTube video of you by Seth Graves; do you still work at Bobbys Dairy Dip? It would be so cool if you do, but I’m thinking that with your music career going stratospheric it’s left little time for anything else.
No, but I miss it a lot, especially the sweet potato fries.

What would you like to have achieved by the time you are 30? (professionally, and personally)?
A few really good albums, a solid band and the cover of the Rolling Stone.
Also, to be completely free of anything resembling a zit or a pimple for the rest of my life. Kids are cool too.

Am I the first person to tell you that your songs give me goose bumps? (I write this in a non-creepy way, I promise you!)
If you’re worried about sounding creepy then I’m worried about sounding arrogant by saying that you’re not the first.


Illustrations by Emma Block

In a genre steeped in tradition, viagra approved Caitlin Rose springs forth like a breath of fresh air. Stripped down to the sweetest bare essentials, her voice rings clear and true, especially when she sings (at times wistfully, often defiantly) about heartbreak and failed relationships. Case in point: Learning To Ride, the opening track of her new album Own Side Now paints a painfully raw snapshot of a first love; “When I was young I used to ride the wild ones, they were lots of fun but they almost took my life. Now all I need is a simple steed, to take me where I need without putting up a fight.”

But while she is a very much a modern girl; smart, opinionated and droll, she is never mocking of her beloved Country music. “I hate a lot of words” she declares in a short video bio of her; eyes shaded by Ray Bans as she stands in front of her place of work, Bobby’s Dairy Dip. She runs through the words in question…. I hate the word “Indie”, and I hate the word ‘Contemporary’…. I hate a lot of words, but ‘Country’s’ a word that I actually really like”.

The popularity of her debut album, Own Side Now has meant that a few one off dates have morphed into a full European tour and she draws her summer of English festival appearances to a close with a performance at The End Of The Road Festival on September 11th.

What can we expect from your new album, Own Side Now? Am I right in thinking that it is going to be less acoustic than your debut EP?
It’s a full band record. There’s a pretty stripped down cut of Sinful Wishing Well though.

How did you make your first start into the Nashville music scene? Can you remember your first gig?
My first show was at a pool party and I was 16. I was too nervous to finish any of the songs.
For a time after that I opened shows for my then-boyfriend’s angry suburban punk band. We broke up and he got all the friends so I had to make new ones. Luckily I met some cool people and a few thought I was a decent songwriter. I used to play a dive called the Springwater and whatever anyone else would throw at me. I wasn’t 21 so I took what I could get.

Country music has passed so much of Britian by, it’s almost criminal. If you were to hand pick a record collection for someone who knew nothing about country music, what records would you put in?
How big? I’d suggest a Merle Haggard Greatest Hits album, some Loretta Lynn, John Prine’s first two albums. Marty Robbin’s Gunfighter Ballads. “Our Mother the Mountain” by Townes Van Zandt.
Guy Clark’s “Old No 1″. As much George Jones as possible. Gram Parsons “GP”. Any of Dolly’s old records. Some essential Patsy Cline. “Hank Williams sings Kaw-Liga and other Funny Songs” is a good one too. Some Carter Family. The Louvin Brother’s “Satan is Real” and throw in a couple of Linda Ronstadt‘s early records for appropriate country rock measure. Early Tanya Tucker is good too.
I could go on, but that’s already a lot. Country music’s all about the song. If you see a record and you think you might like it, buy it (especially if it’s cheap) and figure out your favorite song. That’s the funnest part.

Can you tell us 5 things that we don’t know about Caitlin Rose?
I sleep on cowboy sheets.

I collect talismans and other people’s I.D.’s.

I’m no good with numbers.

I’m a terrible cook.

I’ve had 5 cavities.

Your songs are already known for being pretty straight talking; are you as straight talking in your day to day life?
Not as much as I would like to be.

If Amelia’s Magazine were to come visit you in Nashville ( if you would have us! ), what would we get up to?
I’d show you the Country Music Hall of Fame, Webb Pierce’s guitar shaped swimming pool and Dino’s Bar & Grill on Gallatin Road. I’ve also been hearing a lot about amateur wrestling matches held at a hotel downtown, that sound pretty intriguing.

You have already had some pretty major accomplishments in your career; what have been some of the highlights so far for you?
Bonnaroo and the review in German Rolling Stone were both exciting.

I loved the YouTube video of you by Seth Graves; do you still work at Bobbys Dairy Dip? It would be so cool if you do, but I’m thinking that with your music career going stratospheric it’s left little time for anything else.
No, but I miss it a lot, especially the sweet potato fries.

What would you like to have achieved by the time you are 30? (professionally, and personally)?
A few really good albums, a solid band and the cover of the Rolling Stone.
Also, to be completely free of anything resembling a zit or a pimple for the rest of my life. Kids are cool too.

Am I the first person to tell you that your songs give me goose bumps? (I write this in a non-creepy way, I promise you!)
If you’re worried about sounding creepy then I’m worried about sounding arrogant by saying that you’re not the first.


Illustrations by Emma Block

In a genre steeped in tradition, doctor Caitlin Rose springs forth like a breath of fresh air. Stripped down to the sweetest bare essentials, sildenafil her voice rings clear and true, especially when she sings (at times wistfully, often defiantly) about heartbreak and failed relationships. Case in point: Learning To Ride, the opening track of her new album Own Side Now paints a painfully raw snapshot of a first love; “When I was young I used to ride the wild ones, they were lots of fun but they almost took my life. Now all I need is a simple steed, to take me where I need without putting up a fight.”

But while she is a very much a modern girl; smart, opinionated and droll, she is never mocking of her beloved Country music. “I hate a lot of words” she declares in a short video bio of her; eyes shaded by Ray Bans as she stands in front of her place of work, Bobby’s Dairy Dip. She runs through the words in question…. I hate the word “Indie”, and I hate the word ‘Contemporary’…. but ‘Country’s’ a word that I actually really like”.

The popularity of her debut album, Own Side Now has meant that a few one off dates have morphed into a full European tour and she draws her summer of English festival appearances to a close with a performance at The End Of The Road Festival on September 11th. Recently we emailed Caitlin a bunch of questions, to find out a little bit more about the twenty-three year old girl who is already drawing comparisons to Patsy Cline.

What can we expect from your new album, Own Side Now? Am I right in thinking that it is going to be less acoustic than your debut EP?
It’s a full band record. There’s a pretty stripped down cut of Sinful Wishing Well though.

How did you make your first start into the Nashville music scene? Can you remember your first gig?
My first show was at a pool party and I was 16. I was too nervous to finish any of the songs.
For a time after that I opened shows for my then-boyfriend’s angry suburban punk band. We broke up and he got all the friends so I had to make new ones. Luckily I met some cool people and a few thought I was a decent songwriter. I used to play a dive called the Springwater and whatever anyone else would throw at me. I wasn’t 21 so I took what I could get.

Country music has passed so much of Britian by, it’s almost criminal. If you were to hand pick a record collection for someone who knew nothing about country music, what records would you put in?
How big? I’d suggest a Merle Haggard Greatest Hits album, some Loretta Lynn, John Prine’s first two albums. Marty Robbin’s Gunfighter Ballads. “Our Mother the Mountain” by Townes Van Zandt.
Guy Clark’s “Old No 1″. As much George Jones as possible. Gram Parsons “GP”. Any of Dolly’s old records. Some essential Patsy Cline. “Hank Williams sings Kaw-Liga and other Funny Songs” is a good one too. Some Carter Family. The Louvin Brother’s “Satan is Real” and throw in a couple of Linda Ronstadt‘s early records for appropriate country rock measure. Early Tanya Tucker is good too.
I could go on, but that’s already a lot. Country music’s all about the song. If you see a record and you think you might like it, buy it (especially if it’s cheap) and figure out your favorite song. That’s the funnest part.

Can you tell us 5 things that we don’t know about Caitlin Rose?
I sleep on cowboy sheets.

I collect talismans and other people’s I.D.’s.

I’m no good with numbers.

I’m a terrible cook.

I’ve had 5 cavities.

Your songs are already known for being pretty straight talking; are you as straight talking in your day to day life?
Not as much as I would like to be.

If Amelia’s Magazine were to come visit you in Nashville ( if you would have us! ), what would we get up to?
I’d show you the Country Music Hall of Fame, Webb Pierce’s guitar shaped swimming pool and Dino’s Bar & Grill on Gallatin Road. I’ve also been hearing a lot about amateur wrestling matches held at a hotel downtown, that sound pretty intriguing.

You have already had some pretty major accomplishments in your career; what have been some of the highlights so far for you?
Bonnaroo and the review in German Rolling Stone were both exciting.

I loved the YouTube video of you by Seth Graves; do you still work at Bobbys Dairy Dip? It would be so cool if you do, but I’m thinking that with your music career going stratospheric it’s left little time for anything else.
No, but I miss it a lot, especially the sweet potato fries.

What would you like to have achieved by the time you are 30? (professionally, and personally)?
A few really good albums, a solid band and the cover of the Rolling Stone.
Also, to be completely free of anything resembling a zit or a pimple for the rest of my life. Kids are cool too.

Am I the first person to tell you that your songs give me goose bumps? (I write this in a non-creepy way, I promise you!)
If you’re worried about sounding creepy then I’m worried about sounding arrogant by saying that you’re not the first.


Minna S/S 2010, here illustrated by Yelena Bryksenkova

Ever uttered the words “I’d love to make my own clothes” but then never actually got round to it? Well you wouldn’t be alone, ampoule myself included. I have the basic skills and desire to want to make my own clothes but find it so easy not to do when you succumb to the call of vintage and second hand shops. The impulse and excitement of rummaging makes you forget your previous desire to be your own individual stylist. But moving into the world of creator actually has massive satisfaction and many bragging benefits.  

There have been so many beautiful trends this summer to inspire us but the one that stood out the most to anyone who is thinking of making their own clothing is lace.

Lace is everywhere, on the catwalks, on the high street, and even on our net curtains! Grannies worldwide will have a stash of vintage lace table cloths and curtains prime for the picking to create beautiful one off designs (Which your friends will never be able to copy), and will please your eco-conscience. 


Illustration by Naomi Law

The high street is a great start for inspiration for design, but there are also some amazing individual finds on the internet too. Check out eco-designer Minna Hepburn; her ‘Minna Classics’ collection is a treasure trove of gorgeous lace designs, feminine and playful, and all manufactured in the UK to help support local businesses. If you’re thinking of starting small, Minna offers inspiration not only in clothing but jewellery too, her ‘Kristiina‘ necklace is entirely hand made and created using recycled fabrics including lace and decorated with buttons and beads, something we could all aspire to do. 

When your creativity has peaked and your fingers are itching with excitement for what your about make, head over to www.instructables.com. this website has pretty much anything you could hope to make on it. Blog updates allow you to fill your days by becoming a crafty expert – not only with lace, you can expand your skills to run on for seasons with the amount of ideas and tutorials.

If your still needing that shopping fix, though – as so many of us do, head down to your local second hand book shop where your most likely to find some great new and old pattern books, where you can cut out the patterns and follow the instructions in detail. 


Illustration by Faye West

Whatever you decide to make enjoy the pleasure of creating your own one off, hand made pieces of clothing. It’s time to start paying visits to your friends and families, wardrobes, cupboards, lofts, and basements, for the treasures you never knew you had. Just remember though, – wait until your grannies have finished with their lace net curtains before you start cutting holes in them and fashioning them into on-trend emsembles!  


Lace detail (and one above) by Yelena Bryksenkova

Look out for an interview with Minna soon… but for now, check out our previous chat with her here.


Prangsta, stuff illustrated by Joana Faria

Now, visit web here’s a treat. Hopefully you caught Georgia Takacs’ wonderful insight into the awe-inspiring world of Prangsta Costumiers last week: the celebrated (if somewhat unconventional) Alice in Wonderland-esque bazaar in New Cross.

Now I would never in a million years suggest that readers of Amelia’s Magazine come to the site just to look at pretty pictures, what with our bursting-at-the-seams stock of fabulous writers, but in order to bring a little sunshine and entertainment to a so far grey Wednesday, feast your eyes on some glorious images and illustrations from Prangsta.

Georgia, who wrote the article, took part in a shoot with the team there, capturing the many faces that pass through the doors and even more of the craft-packed corners of this wonderful find. So here they are. I’m convinced you could look at this place all day and never get bored – I hope you agree!


Illustration by Krister Selin

The latest shoot focuses on a somewhat macabre Snow White, shown with an array of weird and wonderful friends:






Illustration by Rachel de Ste. Croix

Prangsta also worked with ethereal fashion photographer Ellen Rogers, and the result is astonishing. Rogers’ photographs make heavy use of photographic techniques from long ago, evoking (for me at least) images of Marlene Dietrich in Hot Venus and the eery portraits of death popular in the Victorian age. Whatever they evoke, this marriage of Prangsta and Rogers is incredible.




Photographs by Ellen Rogers

To read the original article about the wonderful world of Prangsta, click here.

Categories ,Alice in Wonderland, ,Dwarves, ,Ellen Rogers, ,Georgia Takacs, ,illustration, ,Joana Faria, ,Krister Selin, ,Lion, ,london, ,Matt Bramford, ,New Cross, ,photography, ,Prangsta Costumiers, ,Rachel De Ste. Croix, ,snow white

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Leutton Postle

Leutton Postle S/S12 by Alia GargumLeutton Postle LFW S/S12 illustration by Alia Gargum

Upon checking some of Leutton Postle’s previous work I became really excited about the prospect of going to see their first London Fashion Week show and collection: I could see it featured turf-like groups of cable ties sprouting out of hooded garments in various places and I have always used them a lot in my work. A few months ago I spotted a glorious neckpiece made out of cable ties in a high street store window display, information pills so seeing them in Leutton Postle‘s work further confirmed my suspicion that cable ties might just be having a fashion moment.

Leutton Postle LFW S/S12 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Being a newbie to London Fashion Week I could have waited happily for hours in the queue but actually the show was delayed only by half an hour or so, which is pretty good I hear. I followed the crowd into Freemasons’ Hall (Vauxhall Fashion Scout’s venue) and picked up a spot next to the pro photographers at the end of the runway, a decision which made my experience much more intense. As soon as the models came out it was not the soundtrack to the show that I heard but the constant clicking from such a large number of cameras gathered near me; and to me that was just as thrilling.

Leutton Postle LFW S/S12 photo by Amelia Gregory
Leutton Postle LFW S/S12 photo by Amelia Gregory
Leutton Postle S/S12 LFW by Gemma Sheldrake
Leutton Postle S/S 2012 by Gemma Sheldrake

Behind the luxury knitwear label Leutton Postle are designers Sam Leutton and Jenny Postle, both Central Saint Martins graduates – upon graduating Jenny had her MA AW11 collection snapped up by London’s Browns Focus and Sam went to China to work with knitwear innovators Stoll. Their pieces are truly original with a couture quality and they suggest time-consuming experimentation with knitwear design. I felt that in the colourful, intricate and eccentric designs of their collaborative label there was a real enjoyment of craft and play.

Leutton Postle LFW S/S12 by Sam Parr
Leutton Postle S/S 2012 by Sam Parr

Leutton Postle LFW S/S12 photo by Amelia Gregory
Leutton Postle LFW S/S12 photo by Amelia Gregory
Leutton Postle LFW S/S12 photo by Amelia Gregory
Leutton Postle10 LFW S/S12 photo by Amelia Gregory
Leutton Postle LFW S/S12 by Emmi Ojala
Leutton Postle S/S 2012 by Emmi Ojala

Apart from the fact that the collection was very colourful, which has a natural appeal to me personally, the patchwork element was another thing I really enjoyed and it made me think that perhaps in the future, when all designers might have to use mainly scraps and leftovers or recycle fabrics for their designs, it would not be that bad at all if you had Leutton Postle’s talent and imagination! In a way parts of the clothes did seem like they had been constructed from random bits and pieces, put together really cleverly.

Leutton Postle10 LFW S/S12 photo by Amelia Gregory
Leutton Postle10 LFW S/S12 photo by Amelia Gregory
Leutton Postle10 LFW S/S12 photo by Amelia Gregory
Leutton Postle10 LFW S/S12 photo by Amelia Gregory
Leutton Postle10 LFW S/S12 photo by Amelia Gregory
Leutton Postle10 LFW S/S12 photo by Amelia Gregory
Leutton Postle10 LFW S/S12 photo by Amelia Gregory
Leutton Postle10 LFW S/S12 photo by Amelia Gregory
Leutton Postle10 LFW S/S12 photo by Amelia Gregory
Extra elements of colourful playfulness were added to the show by the models’ make up which looked like they had just eaten from a bowl of multicoloured paint soup and then not wiped themselves properly, but it was a shame that some of the models’ faces did not match all that wonderful colour happiness, maybe the soup was not that good…

Leutton Postle LFW S/S12 show 'Baby Fashionista' photo by Maria Papadimitriou
There was also a very colourful toddler in the front row, photography by Maria Papadimitriou

Leutton Postle LFW S/S12 photo by Amelia Gregory
Leutton Postle LFW S/S12 photo by Amelia Gregory
The designers Sam Leutton and Jenny Postle photo by Amelia Gregory
The designers themselves, however, looked very cheery and beautiful when they came out at the end to wave at an audience that was clapping in a very colourful way indeed!

Categories ,Alia Gargum, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Browns Focus, ,catwalk show, ,colour, ,couture, ,craft, ,Emmi Ojala, ,fashion, ,Fashion Designer, ,Fashion Illustration, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Gemma Sheldrake, ,Jenny Postle, ,knitwear, ,Leutton Postle, ,London Fashion Week, ,Make-up, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Merit Winner, ,photography, ,Sam Leutton, ,Sam Parr, ,Stoll, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011: Triumph International Awards


Illustration of Charlotte Taylor by Paolo Caravello

21 fashion shows over five days is no mean feat. The London Fashion Week experience is not complete until you see the sheer amount of work and pure creativity at play during the Fashion Scout shows. The enterprise aims to pluck some of the more obscure yet talented designers out there and provide them with the means and support to build up a sustainable business. We have already seen the back to back Ones to Watch fashion show so here is a little bio for each in addition to Amelia’s write up of the catwalk show.

Parson’s Paris School of Art and Design graduate Georgina Hardinge is already a highly successful designer with a collection for online retail giant Asos under her belt. Her last collection had a very Gaga-esque structured feel to it, page prescription and was picked up by countless magazines and stylists in this summer’s style guides. Erin O’Connor and Little Boots are fans.


Illustration of Georgina Hardinge by Paolo Caravello

A. Hallucination is the brain child of two St Martins graduates – Hwan Sun Park and Chung Chung Lee. Their label was only launched last season and caters for the ‘modern English dandy’ favouring good tailoring and well cut lines, pharmacy modernised with excessive quilting details and added bows to a great effect (if not a little Chanel). The duo use a classic palette in grey, white, beige and black, and their last collection ‘The First Peal’ presented a well crafted and wearable work wardrobe. After taking inspiration from landmarks such as the venue formerly known as The Millenium Dome, their S/S 2011 collection has a lot to beat.

Next up to the block is Amelia’s fave, Charlotte Taylor, also in her second season. With quirky and colourful prints (note she trained under Luella), her S/S 2011 collection is bound to offer a bright and fun style to go with the (hopeful) Indian summer which we missed out on this year. For this collection, her theme is Island Invaders so expect more pokey-fun from the designer in collections to come. Her blog warned not to expect any black and plenty of small orange robots (which are also adorning the VFS cars for the week so look out), silk and bold prints – the sneak preview, a white dress with red and blue stripe detail was lovely, and there’s more where that came from.

The final One to Watch of the week is the lovely, floaty LiLee who, like Georgina has also come under the radar of Asos for a diffusion line. After winning the Highly Commendable award for her London College of Fashion MA graduate show this January, this week Amelia saw how her style has developed since.

Krystof Strozyna was picked up by Vogue in 2007 as one to watch, and after winning the Harrods Design Award for his thesis he has certainly lived up to his potential. Dressing the ‘charismatic and sassy’ woman (he has dressed Cheryl Cole – make of that what you will), his designs utilise graphic lines and perfect fit to create the ultimate pieces. When quizzed on his inspiration for his S/S 11 show, tropical animals and neon lights are listed as key elements in the design process.


Illustration of Prophetik by Paolo Caravello

Prophetik designer Jeff Garner is an eco warrior, a fashion eco warrior. Probably the most well known of the VFS lineup is sustainable fashion brand Prophetik, who have a far more philosophical approach to their collections than contemporaries. Tennessee based, the designer Jeff Garner is firm over the importance of sourcing sustainable fabrics and ethical processes. This year the show entitled ‘Midnight Garden’ focussed on wearable philosophy, and kicked off the VFS shows. Read our review of his show here.

Vauxhall Fashion Scout

21 fashion shows over five days is no mean feat. The London Fashion Week experience is not complete until you see the sheer amount of work and pure creativity at play during the Vauxhall Fashion Scout shows. The enterprise aims to pluck some of the more obscure yet talented designers out there and provide them with the means and support to build up a sustainable business. Today, buy the back to back fashion show will feature four Ones to Watch…and they are all worthy. Here is a little bio for each to wet your appetite before the show. A Hallucination is the brain child of two St Martins graduates – Hwan Sun Park and Chung Chung Lee. Their label was only launched last season and caters for the ‘modern English dandy’ favouring good tailoring and well cut lines, modernised with excessive quilting details and added bows to a great effect (if not a little Chanel). The duo use a classic palette in grey, white, beige and black, and their last collection ‘The First Peal’ presented a well crafted and wearable work wardrobe. After taking inspiration from landmarks such as the venue formerly known as The Millenium Done, their S/S 11 collection has a lot to beat. Next up to the block is Charlotte Taylor, also in her second season. With quirky and colourful prints (note she trained under Luella), her S/S 11 collection is bound to offer a bright and fun style to go with the (hopeful) Indian summer which we missed out on this year. For this collection, her theme is Island Invaders so expect more pokey-fun from the designer. Her blog warns not to expect any black and plenty of small orange robots, silk and bold prints – the sneak preview, a white dress with red and blue stripe detail is lovely, and there’s more where that came from. Parson’s Paris School of Art and Design graduate Georgina Hardinge is already a highly successful designer with a collection for online retail giant Asos under her belt. Her last collection had a very Gaga-esque structured feel to it, and was picked up by countless magazines and stylists in this summer’s style guides. Erin O’Connor and Little Boots are fans.

The final One to Watch of the week is the lovely LiLee who, like Georgina has also come under the radar of Asos for a diffusion line. After winning the Highly Commendable award for her London College of Fashion MA graduate show this January, this week will demonstrate how her style has developed since. Mirroring the twists of a woman’s hair, French rope was used to embellish the dresses in her last collection. Previous one to watch, Eudon Choi has scooped the merit award this year, and gosh, doesn’t he deserve it! After stints at All Saints and Twenty8Twelve he had all the credentials he needed to launch his own line, and that he did. Expect industrial, masculine looks for next year. Krystof Strozyna was picked up by Vogue in 2007 as one to watch, and after winning the Harrods Design Award for his thesis he has certainly lived up to his potential. Dressing the ‘charismatic and sassy’ woman, his designs utilise graphic lines and perfect fit to create the ultimate pieces. When quizzed on his inspiration for his S/S 11 show, tropical animals and neon lights are listed as key elements in the design process.

Prophetik designer Jeff Garner is an eco warrior, a fashion eco warrior. Probably the most well known of the VFS lineup is sustainable fashion brand Prophetik, who have a far more philosophical approach to their collections than contemporaries. Tennessee based, the designer Jeff Garner is firm over the importance of sourcing sustainable fabrics and ethical processes. This year the show entitled ‘Midnight Garden’ will focus on wearable philosophy, and kicked off VFS this zear.
21 fashion shows over five days is no mean feat. The London Fashion Week experience is not complete until you see the sheer amount of work and pure creativity at play during the Vauxhall Fashion Scout shows. The enterprise aims to pluck some of the more obscure yet talented designers out there and provide them with the means and support to build up a sustainable business. Today, pharm the back to back fashion show will feature four Ones to Watch…and they are all worthy. Here is a little bio for each to wet your appetite before the show. A Hallucination is the brain child of two St Martins graduates – Hwan Sun Park and Chung Chung Lee. Their label was only launched last season and caters for the ‘modern English dandy’ favouring good tailoring and well cut lines, unhealthy modernised with excessive quilting details and added bows to a great effect (if not a little Chanel). The duo use a classic palette in grey, clinic white, beige and black, and their last collection ‘The First Peal’ presented a well crafted and wearable work wardrobe. After taking inspiration from landmarks such as the venue formerly known as The Millenium Done, their S/S 11 collection has a lot to beat. Next up to the block is Charlotte Taylor, also in her second season. With quirky and colourful prints (note she trained under Luella), her S/S 11 collection is bound to offer a bright and fun style to go with the (hopeful) Indian summer which we missed out on this year. For this collection, her theme is Island Invaders so expect more pokey-fun from the designer. Her blog warns not to expect any black and plenty of small orange robots, silk and bold prints – the sneak preview, a white dress with red and blue stripe detail is lovely, and there’s more where that came from. Parson’s Paris School of Art and Design graduate Georgina Hardinge is already a highly successful designer with a collection for online retail giant Asos under her belt. Her last collection had a very Gaga-esque structured feel to it, and was picked up by countless magazines and stylists in this summer’s style guides. Erin O’Connor and Little Boots are fans.

The final One to Watch of the week is the lovely LiLee who, like Georgina has also come under the radar of Asos for a diffusion line. After winning the Highly Commendable award for her London College of Fashion MA graduate show this January, this week will demonstrate how her style has developed since. Mirroring the twists of a woman’s hair, French rope was used to embellish the dresses in her last collection. Previous one to watch, Eudon Choi has scooped the merit award this year, and gosh, doesn’t he deserve it! After stints at All Saints and Twenty8Twelve he had all the credentials he needed to launch his own line, and that he did. Expect industrial, masculine looks for next year. Krystof Strozyna was picked up by Vogue in 2007 as one to watch, and after winning the Harrods Design Award for his thesis he has certainly lived up to his potential. Dressing the ‘charismatic and sassy’ woman, his designs utilise graphic lines and perfect fit to create the ultimate pieces. When quizzed on his inspiration for his S/S 11 show, tropical animals and neon lights are listed as key elements in the design process.

Prophetik designer Jeff Garner is an eco warrior, a fashion eco warrior. Probably the most well known of the VFS lineup is sustainable fashion brand Prophetik, who have a far more philosophical approach to their collections than contemporaries. Tennessee based, the designer Jeff Garner is firm over the importance of sourcing sustainable fabrics and ethical processes. This year the show entitled ‘Midnight Garden’ will focus on wearable philosophy, and kicked off VFS this zear.

Illustration of Justin Singh’s entry by Katie Harnett

The calm before the storm, ed the eve of London Fashion Week (16th September) was the night of the Triumph International Awards at The Old Sorting Office. Not really knowing what to expect apart from a whole lorra lingerie, cheap the evening began with drinks and canapés (mini ice cream, mini falafel); before long I was ushered into my amazingly positioned seat directly opposite judges Matthew Williamson (who refused to clap), Helena Christensen (beautiful in the flesh) and Rankin. Although the room was packed, some of the desirable front row seats were a no-show which slightly took away from the significance of sitting there. I did however spot Louise Redknapp, Mary Portas and the cat-like model from the Lancome ads. Both Amelia and Jenny Robbins were there too, and have written, photographed and sketched their respective thoughts on the night here and here.

Follwing a painful introduction from Adam Garcia (actor from Coyote Ugly), we watched a video on each designer. This reminded me so much of the scene from Zoolander award show montage, where they whisper ‘Hansel’ over and over that I had to stifle some giggles. Anyway…to the catwalk show. Well timed and presented, the show ran smoothly with each of the 27 finalists showcasing their winning underwear design. With some outlandish designs such as an exploding balloon costume, an armadillo armour style corset and an organic inspired leafy number, there was much to excite and entertain the audience. My favourites were Vietnamese Pha Thi Cam Tu’s, unzipping flower creation, and Spanish Amaya Caracamo’s wood detail all-in-one.

Illustration of Tovah Cottle’s entry by Katie Harnett

After a speech from judge Hilary Riva, “the future of fashion is very safe” (phew), the winners were announced by Christensen with a flurry of a gold envelope. Caracamo’s wooden all-in-one was crowned runner up, with Italy’s Ludovico Loffreda taking second runner up and Bulgaria’s Nikolay Bogilov snapping up the 15,000 euro first prize for his black ‘Morphology’ creation which interprets the relationship between different muscle groups in the body. His design will be sold by Triumph in Summer 2011.

See all the entries here.

Categories ,Amaya Caracamo, ,Awards, ,bras, ,Helena Christensen, ,Hilary Riva, ,knickers, ,Lancome, ,lingerie, ,live, ,London Fashion Week, ,Louise Redknapp, ,Ludovico Loffreda, ,Mary Portas, ,Matthew Williamson, ,Morphology, ,Nikolay Bogilov, ,Pha Thi Cam Tu, ,photography, ,Rankin, ,Shape Sensation, ,The Old Sorting Office, ,Triumph, ,Triumph International Awards, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Emilio de la Morena (by Helen)

I know that folk music isn’t all organic, store illness whole foods, order and love – or indeed deep lust – buried in a haystack. Happy all day, ed before campfires and passions at night. No, folk musicians don’t spend their days wearing slightly grubby lumberjacks or floaty, ethereal frocks. See evidence: Grizzly Bear aren’t happy all the time and Bon Iver is a delightfully melancholy chap. And then just listen to Nick Drake and young Laura Marling. To be honest I’m not really sure where I got the skippy, clappy, dancing in the hazy afternoon sunshine vision from. Perhaps it’s because folk artists tend to sing about the earth, nature and love in one breath. There is no chat of ‘honeys’ or ‘bling’. Gah, And of course, folkers may be generally creative and appreciative of the natural world, but it in no means leaves them exempt of sadness, hurt and darkness. I wonder, does it in actual fact make them more open and adept to describing their feelings than the blingers? Regardless, folk is often as rhythmic and warming as the grandfather clock that my 40s’ Grandpa chopped the bottom of, to fit in his house. Tick, tock. Folk is cosy and true, which is why it feels so pure – which is why it makes me want to reside in a yurt.

Let me introduce you to Emily Jane White. The PR sheet in-front of me says that her album is: ‘a collection of ten opulent, uncluttered and captivating ballads.’ A friend asked me other day, “If you had to only use one adjective for the rest of your life, what would it be?” If I was a news writer, I would say: “Peh, what even are adjectives?”. As a PR I would pass out. Whilst as a writer of my own devices, I would say – ‘blissful’. Then I could put ‘anti’ in-front of a word perhaps. Awkward. Anyway, off on a tangent again: Emily Jane White’s music is BLISSFUL.

See:

She is melancholy. But in the way that makes you feel perhaps strangely, very contented. Maybe it is because in a sense Emily is making peace with herself and her thoughts through the act of writing her music. She said that she found writing her latest album, Ode To Sentience, out now on Talitres Records, cathartic to write: “They speak to the emotional simplicity and complexity of human relationship. I chose to call the record Ode To Sentience because it is the capacity to feel that creates a share human experience of music. We all share the potency of music by having the capacity to feel, and I found the simplicity of this fact very beautiful.”

‘Tis true.

Her album is about leaving home, her’s was California – I Lay To Rest (California) – the drawn out strings longing to leave. The sharper notes; the sadness of leaving it. Clipped Wings is ghostly and full of yearning, reflections of love’s passed. The Cliff holds classic American twangs, whilst Oh Katherine, is a string filled heaven of a song. Her voice is as soft and delicate as a peach, whilst her fearless approach to singing from the darker depths of her consciousness matches the strings perfectly.

She is much like a Californian Kate Bush, but less obviously ethereal and screaming. Or she could be a gentler Alela Diane or singular Mountain Man. Black Silk has to be my personal favourite. The Law is guitar based, slow and… actually quite a lot like my Grandpa’s Grandfather clock. It wraps you up. Says it’s all ok. And here we have ‘The Law’, for you to download for free: here : http://audio.talitres.com/thelaw. Download now.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Lesley Barnes
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Lesley Barnes.

On arrival at the Topshop space in Billingsgate for Mary Katrantzou I pulled up my Pashley beneath a phalanx of official LFW cars and blacked out big name magazine people carriers. I usually find it takes me approximately the same amount of time to race between venues on my bike alongside said official cars, dosage no doubt being looked down upon by wealthy magazines’ fashion editors from behind those blacked out panes. In fact, treatment maybe I should post an ode to my preferred transport, order in much the same vein that Susie Bubble has been posting about her sponsored Orla Kiely car?

Pashley
My Pashley locked up outside Somerset House.

I love cycling but it was a struggle – as usual – to lock my bike against a post without it, me and my cycling pannier capsizing in an (un)attractive pile. At times like these I very much hope I’m not being watched by those who are able to elegantly descend from their car in vertiginous heels.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

We were only granted one ticket to Mary Katrantzou, beautifully pearlised and colourfully printed on heavy card. Clearly then, there was no chance that anyone else was going to lay their hands on it. Having scoped the layout during Michael Van Der Ham the day before I headed straight for what I considered the best position in the cavernous hall and discovered that I was sitting next to the proud mother of Mary’s right hand man, one Alexander Giantsis, also of Greek extraction… she quickly voiced her motherly worries about her son’s lack of sleep. None, the night before.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Mira Tazkia
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Mira Tazkia.

My spot proved the perfect place to capture the models as they swung around to face the bank of cameras right at the end of the looong catwalk. Mum Stephanie kept up a running commentary as I tried to concentrate on capturing the clothes whirring past me at the hyper fast pace that has characterised the catwalk shows this season.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh.

Despite her own concerns that she’s pushing the parameters of what people will wear Mary Katrantzou has quickly built up a glowing reputation for her clashing prints and clever architectural constructions. Last season she took architecture as her starting point but this time she looked to interiors, quoting the Marchesa Luisa Casati in her press release: “I want to be a living work of art.”

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon.

Clever hooping was attached at waist level to create a kind of riser inspired by the shape of vases, Faberge eggs and porcelain bowls – beautiful, but the kind of thing that only the thinnest of girls can get away with wearing. More successful for bigger girls would be the wide hipped dresses, curved shoulders and over skirts that stood proud from the figure. Clashing prints inspired by “priceless objets d’art” were cut and merged to create a profusion of pattern and colour in both print, embroidery and intarsia knits.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana FariaMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana FariaMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana Faria
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana Faria.

One dress featured an extraordinary skirt covered in three dimensional roses in a diagonal pattern – certainly not for the faint hearted… or those who would like to be comfortable when sitting down. Towards the end a series of chiffon skirts swept onto the catwalk, billowing dramatically around the figure.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Sarah Matthews
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Sarah Matthews.

This A/W show was everything I had hoped for: Mary Katrantzou, a fashion designer after my own maximalist heart. I’m so glad that someone out there is confident enough to translate this type of vision onto clothing.
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can see more fashion illustration by Lesley Barnes in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Emily Jane White by LJG Art & Illustration
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, information pills LG Illustration

I know that folk music isn’t all organic, information pills whole foods, clinic and love – or indeed deep lust – buried in a haystack. Happy all day, before campfires and passions at night. No, folk musicians don’t spend their days wearing slightly grubby lumberjacks or floaty, ethereal frocks. See evidence: Grizzly Bear aren’t happy all the time and Bon Iver is a delightfully melancholy chap. And then just listen to Nick Drake and young Laura Marling. To be honest I’m not really sure where I got the skippy, clappy, dancing in the hazy afternoon sunshine vision from. Perhaps it’s because folk artists tend to sing about the earth, nature and love in one breath. There is no chat of ‘honeys’ or ‘bling’. Gah, And of course, folkers may be generally creative and appreciative of the natural world, but it in no means leaves them exempt of sadness, hurt and darkness. I wonder, does it in actual fact make them more open and adept to describing their feelings than the blingers? Regardless, folk is often as rhythmic and warming as the grandfather clock that my 40s’ Grandpa chopped the bottom of, to fit in his house. Tick, tock. Folk is cosy and true, which is why it feels so pure – which is why it makes me want to reside in a yurt.

Emily Jane White - Sarah Matthews
Illustration by Sarah Matthews

Let me introduce you to Emily Jane White. The PR sheet in-front of me says that her album is: ‘a collection of ten opulent, uncluttered and captivating ballads.’ A friend asked me other day, “If you had to only use one adjective for the rest of your life, what would it be?” If I was a news writer, I would say: “Peh, what even are adjectives?”. As a PR I would pass out. Whilst as a writer of my own devices, I would say – ‘blissful’. Then I could put ‘anti’ in-front of a word perhaps. Awkward. Anyway, off on a tangent again: Emily Jane White’s music is BLISSFUL.

See:

She is melancholy. But in the way that makes you feel perhaps strangely, very contented. Maybe it is because in a sense Emily is making peace with herself and her thoughts through the act of writing her music. She said that she found writing her latest album, Ode To Sentience, out now on Talitres Records, cathartic to write: “They speak to the emotional simplicity and complexity of human relationship. I chose to call the record Ode To Sentience because it is the capacity to feel that creates a share human experience of music. We all share the potency of music by having the capacity to feel, and I found the simplicity of this fact very beautiful.”

‘Tis true.

emily Jane White

Her album is about leaving home, her’s was California – I Lay To Rest (California) – the drawn out strings longing to leave. The sharper notes; the sadness of leaving it. Clipped Wings is ghostly and full of yearning, reflections of love’s passed. The Cliff holds classic American twangs, whilst Oh Katherine, is a string filled heaven of a song. Her voice is as soft and delicate as a peach, whilst her fearless approach to singing from the darker depths of her consciousness matches the strings perfectly.

She is much like a Californian Kate Bush, but less obviously ethereal and screaming. Or she could be a gentler Alela Diane or singular Mountain Man. Black Silk has to be my personal favourite. The Law is guitar based, slow and… actually quite a lot like my Grandpa’s Grandfather clock. It wraps you up. Says it’s all ok. And here we have ‘The Law’, for you to download for free: here : http://audio.talitres.com/thelaw. Download now.

Emily Jane White by LJG Art & Illustration
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, viagra buy LG Illustration

I know that folk music isn’t all organic, store whole foods, and love – or indeed deep lust – buried in a haystack. Happy all day, before campfires and passions at night. No, folk musicians don’t spend their days wearing slightly grubby lumberjacks or floaty, ethereal frocks. See evidence: Grizzly Bear aren’t happy all the time and Bon Iver is a delightfully melancholy chap. And then just listen to Nick Drake and young Laura Marling. To be honest I’m not really sure where I got the skippy, clappy, dancing in the hazy afternoon sunshine vision from. Perhaps it’s because folk artists tend to sing about the earth, nature and love in one breath. There is no chat of ‘honeys’ or ‘bling’. Gah, And of course, folkers may be generally creative and appreciative of the natural world, but it in no means leaves them exempt of sadness, hurt and darkness. I wonder, does it in actual fact make them more open and adept to describing their feelings than the blingers? Regardless, folk is often as rhythmic and warming as the grandfather clock that my 40s’ Grandpa chopped the bottom of, to fit in his house. Tick, tock. Folk is cosy and true, which is why it feels so pure – which is why it makes me want to reside in a yurt.

Emily Jane White - Sarah Matthews
Illustration by Sarah Matthews

Let me introduce you to Emily Jane White. The PR sheet in-front of me says that her album is: ‘a collection of ten opulent, uncluttered and captivating ballads.’ A friend asked me other day, “If you had to only use one adjective for the rest of your life, what would it be?” If I was a news writer, I would say: “Peh, what even are adjectives?”. As a PR I would pass out. Whilst as a writer of my own devices, I would say – ‘blissful’. Then I could put ‘anti’ in-front of a word perhaps. Awkward. Anyway, off on a tangent again: Emily Jane White’s music is BLISSFUL.

See:

She is melancholy. But in the way that makes you feel perhaps strangely, very contented. Maybe it is because in a sense Emily is making peace with herself and her thoughts through the act of writing her music. She said that she found writing her latest album, Ode To Sentience, out now on Talitres Records, cathartic to write: “They speak to the emotional simplicity and complexity of human relationship. I chose to call the record Ode To Sentience because it is the capacity to feel that creates a share human experience of music. We all share the potency of music by having the capacity to feel, and I found the simplicity of this fact very beautiful.”

‘Tis true.

emily Jane White
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, LG Illustration

Her album is about leaving home, her’s was California – I Lay To Rest (California) – the drawn out strings longing to leave. The sharper notes; the sadness of leaving it. Clipped Wings is ghostly and full of yearning, reflections of love’s passed. The Cliff holds classic American twangs, whilst Oh Katherine, is a string filled heaven of a song. Her voice is as soft and delicate as a peach, whilst her fearless approach to singing from the darker depths of her consciousness matches the strings perfectly.

She is much like a Californian Kate Bush, but less obviously ethereal and screaming. Or she could be a gentler Alela Diane or singular Mountain Man. Black Silk has to be my personal favourite. The Law is guitar based, slow and… actually quite a lot like my Grandpa’s Grandfather clock. It wraps you up. Says it’s all ok. And here we have ‘The Law’, for you to download for free: here : http://audio.talitres.com/thelaw. Download now.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Lesley Barnes
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Lesley Barnes.

On arrival at the Topshop space in Billingsgate for Mary Katrantzou I pulled up my Pashley beneath a phalanx of official LFW cars and blacked out big name magazine people carriers. I usually find it takes me approximately the same amount of time to race between venues on my bike alongside said official cars, approved no doubt being looked down upon by wealthy magazines’ fashion editors from behind those blacked out panes. In fact, maybe I should post an ode to my preferred transport, in much the same vein that Susie Bubble has been posting about her sponsored Orla Kiely car?

Pashley
My Pashley locked up outside Somerset House.

I love cycling but it was a struggle – as usual – to lock my bike against a post without it, me and my cycling pannier capsizing in an (un)attractive pile. At times like these I very much hope I’m not being watched by those who are able to elegantly descend from their car in vertiginous heels.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

We were only granted one ticket to Mary Katrantzou, beautifully pearlised and colourfully printed on heavy card. Clearly then, there was no chance that anyone else was going to lay their hands on it. Having scoped the layout during Michael Van Der Ham the day before I headed straight for what I considered the best position in the cavernous hall and discovered that I was sitting next to the proud mother of Mary’s right hand man, one Alexander Giantsis, also of Greek extraction… she quickly voiced her motherly worries about her son’s lack of sleep. None, the night before.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Mira Tazkia
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Mira Tazkia.

My spot proved the perfect place to capture the models as they swung around to face the bank of cameras right at the end of the looong catwalk. Mum Stephanie kept up a running commentary as I tried to concentrate on capturing the clothes whirring past me at the hyper fast pace that has characterised the catwalk shows this season.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh.

Despite her own concerns that she’s pushing the parameters of what people will wear Mary Katrantzou has quickly built up a glowing reputation for her clashing prints and clever architectural constructions. Last season she took architecture as her starting point but this time she looked to interiors, quoting the Marchesa Luisa Casati in her press release: “I want to be a living work of art.”

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon.

Clever hooping was attached at waist level to create a kind of riser inspired by the shape of vases, Fabergé eggs and porcelain bowls – beautiful, but the kind of thing that only the thinnest of girls can get away with wearing. More successful for bigger girls would be the wide hipped dresses, curved shoulders and over skirts that stood proud from the figure. Clashing prints inspired by “priceless objets d’art” were cut and merged to create a profusion of pattern and colour in both print, embroidery and intarsia knits.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana FariaMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana FariaMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana Faria
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana Faria.

One dress featured an extraordinary skirt covered in three dimensional roses in a diagonal pattern – certainly not for the faint hearted… or those who would like to be comfortable when sitting down. Towards the end a series of chiffon skirts swept onto the catwalk, billowing dramatically around the figure.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Sarah Matthews
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Sarah Matthews.

This A/W show was everything I had hoped for: Mary Katrantzou, a fashion designer after my own maximalist heart. I’m so glad that someone out there is confident enough to translate this type of vision onto clothing.
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can see more fashion illustration by Lesley Barnes in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Lesley Barnes
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Lesley Barnes.

On arrival at the Topshop space in Billingsgate for Mary Katrantzou I pulled up my Pashley beneath a phalanx of official LFW cars and blacked out big name magazine people carriers. I usually find it takes me approximately the same amount of time to race between venues on my bike alongside said official cars, illness no doubt being looked down upon by wealthy magazines’ fashion editors from behind those blacked out panes, order but maybe I should post an ode to my preferred transport, link in much the same vein that Susie Bubble has been posting about her sponsored Orla Kiely car?

Pashley
My Pashley locked up outside Somerset House.

I love cycling but it was a struggle – as usual – to lock my bike against a post without it, me and my cycling pannier capsizing in an (un)attractive pile. At times like these I very much hope I’m not being watched by those who are able to elegantly descend from their car in vertiginous heels.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

We were only granted one ticket to Mary Katrantzou, beautifully pearlised and colourfully printed on heavy card. Clearly then, there was no chance that anyone else was going to lay their hands on it. Having scoped the layout during Michael Van Der Ham the day before I headed straight for what I considered the best position in the cavernous hall and discovered that I was sitting next to the proud mother of Mary’s right hand man, one Alexander Giantsis, also of Greek extraction… she quickly voiced her motherly worries about her son’s lack of sleep. That would be none then, the night before.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Mira Tazkia
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Mira Tazkia.

My spot proved the perfect place to capture the models as they swung around to face the bank of cameras right at the end of the looong catwalk. Mum Stephanie kept up a running commentary as I tried to concentrate on capturing the clothes whirring past me at the hyper fast pace that has characterised the catwalk shows this season.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh.

Despite her own concerns that she’s pushing the parameters of what people will wear Mary Katrantzou has quickly built up a glowing reputation for her clashing prints and clever architectural constructions. Last season she took architecture as her starting point but this time she looked to interiors, quoting the Marchesa Luisa Casati in her press release: “I want to be a living work of art.”

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon.

Clever hooping was attached at waist level to create a kind of riser inspired by the shape of vases, Fabergé eggs and porcelain bowls – beautiful, but the kind of thing that only the thinnest of girls can get away with wearing. More successful for bigger girls would be the wide hipped dresses, curved shoulders and over skirts that stood proud from the figure. Clashing prints inspired by “priceless objets d’art” were cut and merged to create a profusion of pattern and colour in print, embroidery and intarsia knits.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana FariaMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana FariaMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana Faria
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana Faria.

One dress featured an extraordinary skirt covered in three dimensional roses in a diagonal pattern – certainly not for the faint hearted… or those who would like to be comfortable when sitting down. Towards the end a series of chiffon skirts swept onto the catwalk, billowing dramatically around the figure.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Sarah Matthews
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Sarah Matthews.

This A/W show was everything I had hoped for: Mary Katrantzou, a fashion designer after my own maximalist heart. I’m so glad that someone out there is confident enough to translate my type of design onto clothing.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can see more fashion illustration by Lesley Barnes in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Emily Jane White by LJG Art & Illustration
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, discount LG Illustration

I know that folk music isn’t all organic, stomach whole foods, and love – or indeed deep lust – buried in a haystack. Happy all day, before campfires and passions at night. No, folk musicians don’t spend their days wearing slightly grubby lumberjacks or floaty, ethereal frocks. See evidence: Grizzly Bear aren’t happy all the time and Bon Iver is a delightfully melancholy chap. And then just listen to Nick Drake and young Laura Marling. To be honest I’m not really sure where I got the skippy, clappy, dancing in the hazy afternoon sunshine vision from. Perhaps it’s because folk artists tend to sing about the earth, nature and love in one breath. There is no chat of ‘honeys’ or ‘bling’. Gah, And of course, folkers may be generally creative and appreciative of the natural world, but it in no means leaves them exempt of sadness, hurt and darkness. I wonder, does it in actual fact make them more open and adept to describing their feelings than the blingers? Regardless, folk is often as rhythmic and warming as the grandfather clock that my 40s’ Grandpa chopped the bottom of, to fit in his house. Tick, tock. Folk is cosy and true, which is why it feels so pure – which is why it makes me want to reside in a yurt.

Emily Jane White - Sarah Matthews
Illustration by Sarah Matthews

Let me introduce you to Emily Jane White. The PR sheet in-front of me says that her album is: ‘a collection of ten opulent, uncluttered and captivating ballads.’ A friend asked me other day, “If you had to only use one adjective for the rest of your life, what would it be?” If I was a news writer, I would say: “Peh, what even are adjectives?”. As a PR I would pass out. Whilst as a writer of my own devices, I would say – ‘blissful’. Then I could put ‘anti’ in-front of a word perhaps. Awkward. Anyway, off on a tangent again: Emily Jane White’s music is BLISSFUL.

See:

She is melancholy. But in the way that makes you feel perhaps strangely, very contented. Maybe it is because in a sense Emily is making peace with herself and her thoughts through the act of writing her music. She said that she found writing her latest album, Ode To Sentience, out now on Talitres Records, cathartic to write: “They speak to the emotional simplicity and complexity of human relationship. I chose to call the record Ode To Sentience because it is the capacity to feel that creates a share human experience of music. We all share the potency of music by having the capacity to feel, and I found the simplicity of this fact very beautiful.”

‘Tis true.

emily Jane White
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, LG Illustration

Her album is about leaving home, her’s was California – I Lay To Rest (California) – the drawn out strings longing to leave. The sharper notes; the sadness of leaving it. Clipped Wings is ghostly and full of yearning, reflections of love’s passed. The Cliff holds classic American twangs, whilst Oh Katherine, is a string filled heaven of a song. Her voice is as soft and delicate as a peach, whilst her fearless approach to singing from the darker depths of her consciousness matches the strings perfectly.

She is much like a Californian Kate Bush, but less obviously ethereal and screaming. Or she could be a gentler Alela Diane or singular Mountain Man. Black Silk has to be my personal favourite. The Law is guitar based, slow and… actually quite a lot like my Grandpa’s Grandfather clock. It wraps you up. Says it’s all ok. And here we have ‘The Law’, for you to download for free: here. Download it now.

Emily Jane White by LJG Art & Illustration
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, illness LG Illustration

I know that folk music isn’t all organic, whole foods, and love – or indeed deep lust – buried in a haystack. Happy all day, before campfires and passions at night. No, folk musicians don’t spend their days wearing slightly grubby lumberjacks or floaty, ethereal frocks. See evidence: Grizzly Bear aren’t happy all the time and Bon Iver is a delightfully melancholy chap. And then just listen to Nick Drake and young Laura Marling. To be honest I’m not really sure where I got the skippy, clappy, dancing in the hazy afternoon sunshine vision from. Perhaps it’s because folk artists tend to sing about the earth, nature and love in one breath. There is no chat of ‘honeys’ or ‘bling’. Gah, And of course, folkers may be generally creative and appreciative of the natural world, but it in no means leaves them exempt of sadness, hurt and darkness. I wonder, does it in actual fact make them more open and adept to describing their feelings than the blingers? Regardless, folk is often as rhythmic and warming as the grandfather clock that my 40s’ Grandpa chopped the bottom of, to fit in his house. Tick, tock. Folk is cosy and true, which is why it feels so pure – which is why it makes me want to reside in a yurt.

Emily Jane White - Sarah Matthews
Illustration by Sarah Matthews

Let me introduce you to Emily Jane White. The PR sheet in-front of me says that her album is: ‘a collection of ten opulent, uncluttered and captivating ballads.’ A friend asked me other day, “If you had to only use one adjective for the rest of your life, what would it be?” If I was a news writer, I would say: “Peh, what even are adjectives?”. As a PR I would pass out. Whilst as a writer of my own devices, I would say – ‘blissful’. Then I could put ‘anti’ in-front of a word perhaps. Awkward. Anyway, off on a tangent again: Emily Jane White’s music is BLISSFUL.

See:

She is melancholy. But in the way that makes you feel perhaps strangely, very contented. Maybe it is because in a sense Emily is making peace with herself and her thoughts through the act of writing her music. She said that she found writing her latest album, Ode To Sentience, out now on Talitres Records, cathartic to write: “They speak to the emotional simplicity and complexity of human relationship. I chose to call the record Ode To Sentience because it is the capacity to feel that creates a share human experience of music. We all share the potency of music by having the capacity to feel, and I found the simplicity of this fact very beautiful.”

‘Tis true.

emily Jane White
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, LG Illustration

Her album is about leaving home, her’s was California – I Lay To Rest (California) – the drawn out strings longing to leave. The sharper notes; the sadness of leaving it. Clipped Wings is ghostly and full of yearning, reflections of love’s passed. The Cliff holds classic American twangs, whilst Oh Katherine, is a string filled heaven of a song. Her voice is as soft and delicate as a peach, whilst her fearless approach to singing from the darker depths of her consciousness matches the strings perfectly.

She is much like a Californian Kate Bush, but less obviously ethereal and screaming. Or she could be a gentler Alela Diane or singular Mountain Man. Black Silk has to be my personal favourite. The Law is guitar based, slow and… actually quite a lot like my Grandpa’s Grandfather clock. It wraps you up. Says it’s all ok. And here we have ‘The Law’, for you to download for free: here. Download it now.

Emily Jane White’s Album, Ode to Sentience is available now on Talitres Records.

Emily Jane White by LJG Art & Illustration
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, drug LG Illustration

I know that folk music isn’t all organic, information pills whole foods, and love – or indeed deep lust – buried in a haystack. Happy all day, before campfires and passions at night. No, folk musicians don’t spend their days wearing slightly grubby lumberjacks or floaty, ethereal frocks. See evidence: Grizzly Bear aren’t happy all the time and Bon Iver is a delightfully melancholy chap. And then just listen to Nick Drake and young Laura Marling. To be honest I’m not really sure where I got the skippy, clappy, dancing in the hazy afternoon sunshine vision from. Perhaps it’s because folk artists tend to sing about the earth, nature and love in one breath. There is no chat of ‘honeys’ or ‘bling’. Gah, And of course, folkers may be generally creative and appreciative of the natural world, but it in no means leaves them exempt of sadness, hurt and darkness. I wonder, does it in actual fact make them more open and adept to describing their feelings than the blingers? Regardless, folk is often as rhythmic and warming as the grandfather clock that my 40s’ Grandpa chopped the bottom of, to fit in his house. Tick, tock. Folk is cosy and true, which is why it feels so pure – which is why it makes me want to reside in a yurt.

Emily Jane White - Sarah Matthews
Illustration by Sarah Matthews

Let me introduce you to Emily Jane White. The PR sheet in-front of me says that her album is: ‘a collection of ten opulent, uncluttered and captivating ballads.’ A friend asked me other day, “If you had to only use one adjective for the rest of your life, what would it be?” If I was a news writer, I would say: “Peh, what even are adjectives?”. As a PR I would pass out. Whilst as a writer of my own devices, I would say – ‘blissful’. Then I could put ‘anti’ in-front of a word perhaps. Awkward. Anyway, off on a tangent again: Emily Jane White’s music is BLISSFUL.

See:

She is melancholy. But in the way that makes you feel perhaps strangely, very contented. Maybe it is because in a sense Emily is making peace with herself and her thoughts through the act of writing her music. She said that she found writing her latest album, Ode To Sentience, out now on Talitres Records, cathartic to write: “They speak to the emotional simplicity and complexity of human relationship. I chose to call the record Ode To Sentience because it is the capacity to feel that creates a share human experience of music. We all share the potency of music by having the capacity to feel, and I found the simplicity of this fact very beautiful.”

‘Tis true.

emily Jane White
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, LG Illustration

Her album is about leaving home, her’s was California – I Lay To Rest (California) – the drawn out strings longing to leave. The sharper notes; the sadness of leaving it. Clipped Wings is ghostly and full of yearning, reflections of love’s passed. The Cliff holds classic American twangs, whilst Oh Katherine, is a string filled heaven of a song. Her voice is as soft and delicate as a peach, whilst her fearless approach to singing from the darker depths of her consciousness matches the strings perfectly.

She is much like a Californian Kate Bush, but less obviously ethereal and screaming. Or she could be a gentler Alela Diane or singular Mountain Man. Black Silk has to be my personal favourite. The Law is guitar based, slow and… actually quite a lot like my Grandpa’s Grandfather clock. It wraps you up. Says it’s all ok. And here we have ‘The Law’, for you to download for free: here. Download it now.

Emily Jane White’s Album, Ode to Sentience is available now on Talitres Records.

Emily Jane White by LJG Art & Illustration
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, LG Illustration

I know that folk music isn’t all organic, salve whole foods, and love – or indeed deep lust – buried in a haystack. Happy all day, before campfires and passions at night. No, folk musicians don’t spend their days wearing slightly grubby lumberjacks or floaty, ethereal frocks. See evidence: Grizzly Bear aren’t happy all the time and Bon Iver is a delightfully melancholy chap. And then just listen to Nick Drake and young Laura Marling. To be honest I’m not really sure where I got the skippy, clappy, dancing in the hazy afternoon sunshine vision from. Perhaps it’s because folk artists tend to sing about the earth, nature and love in one breath. There is no chat of ‘honeys’ or ‘bling’. Gah, And of course, folkers may be generally creative and appreciative of the natural world, but it in no means leaves them exempt of sadness, hurt and darkness. I wonder, does it in actual fact make them more open and adept to describing their feelings than the blingers? Regardless, folk is often as rhythmic and warming as the grandfather clock that my 40s’ Grandpa chopped the bottom of, to fit in his house. Tick, tock. Folk is cosy and true, which is why it feels so pure – which is why it makes me want to reside in a yurt.

Emily Jane White - Sarah Matthews
Illustration by Sarah Matthews

Let me introduce you to Emily Jane White. The PR sheet in-front of me says that her album is: ‘a collection of ten opulent, uncluttered and captivating ballads.’ A friend asked me other day, “If you had to only use one adjective for the rest of your life, what would it be?” If I was a news writer, I would say: “Peh, what even are adjectives?”. As a PR I would pass out. Whilst as a writer of my own devices, I would say – ‘blissful’. Then I could put ‘anti’ in-front of a word perhaps. Awkward. Anyway, off on a tangent again: Emily Jane White’s music is BLISSFUL.

See:

She is melancholy. But in the way that makes you feel perhaps strangely, very contented. Maybe it is because in a sense Emily is making peace with herself and her thoughts through the act of writing her music. She said that she found writing her latest album, Ode To Sentience, out now on Talitres Records, cathartic to write: “They speak to the emotional simplicity and complexity of human relationship. I chose to call the record Ode To Sentience because it is the capacity to feel that creates a share human experience of music. We all share the potency of music by having the capacity to feel, and I found the simplicity of this fact very beautiful.”

‘Tis true.

emily Jane White
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, LG Illustration

Her album is about leaving home, her’s was California – I Lay To Rest (California) – the drawn out strings longing to leave. The sharper notes; the sadness of leaving it. Clipped Wings is ghostly and full of yearning, reflections of love’s passed. The Cliff holds classic American twangs, whilst Oh Katherine, is a string filled heaven of a song. Her voice is as soft and delicate as a peach, whilst her fearless approach to singing from the darker depths of her consciousness matches the strings perfectly.

She is much like a Californian Kate Bush, but less obviously ethereal and screaming. Or she could be a gentler Alela Diane or singular Mountain Man. Black Silk has to be my personal favourite. The Law is guitar based, slow and… actually quite a lot like my Grandpa’s Grandfather clock. It wraps you up. Says it’s all ok. For a little bit of this, here we have ‘The Law’, for you to download for free: here. Download it now.

Emily Jane White’s Album, Ode to Sentience is available now on Talitres Records.

Emily Jane White by LJG Art & Illustration
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, case LG Illustration

I know that folk music isn’t all organic, ampoule whole foods, see and love – or indeed deep lust – buried in a haystack. Happy all day, before campfires and passions at night. No, folk musicians don’t spend their days wearing slightly grubby lumberjacks or floaty, ethereal frocks. See evidence: Grizzly Bear aren’t happy all the time and Bon Iver is a delightfully melancholy chap. And then just listen to Nick Drake and young Laura Marling. To be honest I’m not really sure where I got the skippy, clappy, dancing in the hazy afternoon sunshine vision from. Perhaps it’s because folk artists tend to sing about the earth, nature and love in one breath. There is no chat of ‘honeys’ or ‘bling’. Gah, And of course, folkers may be generally creative and appreciative of the natural world, but it in no means leaves them exempt of sadness, hurt and darkness. I wonder, does it in actual fact make them more open and adept to describing their feelings than the blingers? Regardless, folk is often as rhythmic and warming as the grandfather clock that my 40s’ Grandpa chopped the bottom of, to fit in his house. Tick, tock. Folk is cosy and true, which is why it feels so pure – which is why it makes me want to reside in a yurt.

Emily Jane White - Sarah Matthews
Illustration by Sarah Matthews

Let me introduce you to Emily Jane White. The PR sheet in-front of me says that her album is: ‘a collection of ten opulent, uncluttered and captivating ballads.’ A friend asked me other day, “If you had to only use one adjective for the rest of your life, what would it be?” If I was a news writer, I would say: “Peh, what even are adjectives?”. As a PR I would pass out. Whilst as a writer of my own devices, I would say – ‘blissful’. Then I could put ‘anti’ in-front of a word perhaps. Awkward. Anyway, off on a tangent again: Emily Jane White’s music is BLISSFUL.

See:

She is melancholy. But in the way that makes you feel perhaps strangely, very contented. Maybe it is because in a sense Emily is making peace with herself and her thoughts through the act of writing her music. She said that she found writing her latest album, Ode To Sentience, out now on Talitres Records, cathartic to write: “They speak to the emotional simplicity and complexity of human relationship. I chose to call the record Ode To Sentience because it is the capacity to feel that creates a share human experience of music. We all share the potency of music by having the capacity to feel, and I found the simplicity of this fact very beautiful.”

‘Tis true.

emily Jane White
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, LG Illustration

Her album is about leaving home, her’s was California – I Lay To Rest (California) – the drawn out strings longing to leave. The sharper notes; the sadness of leaving it. Clipped Wings is ghostly and full of yearning, reflections of love’s passed. The Cliff holds classic American twangs, whilst Oh Katherine, is a string filled heaven of a song. Her voice is as soft and delicate as a peach, whilst her fearless approach to singing from the darker depths of her consciousness matches the strings perfectly.

She is much like a Californian Kate Bush, but less obviously ethereal and screaming. Or she could be a gentler Alela Diane or singular Mountain Man. Black Silk has to be my personal favourite. The Law is guitar based, slow and… actually quite a lot like my Grandpa’s Grandfather clock. It wraps you up. Says it’s all ok. For a little bit of this, here we have ‘The Law’, for you to download for free: here. Download it now.

Emily Jane White’s Album, Ode to Sentience is available now on Talitres Records.

Emilio de la Morena by Faye West
Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Illustration by Faye West

Apparently Emilio de la Morena has lengthened his silhouette. His pieces are now touching, viagra sale or over the knee, nurse ‘signalling a new direction that is stricter and more refined.’ The body con is still there of course, thumb remaining tighter than a wetsuit, and both wigglier and feistier than Mad Men’s, Joan. That’s exactly what the collection made me think of: Joan and Jessica Rabbit. This translates to: HOT… but sophisticated.

Red Charlotte Olympia shoes featured throughout the show. Now, I’ve always been a fan of red shoes. From ballet to sky scraping, red shoes are sweet vixens, minxes, all playful and naughty. But less; “stop it Roger” and more; “Roger I want champagne, oysters and Chanel. Get them!” She needs a man, not a wimp. She will wear her shoes in the bath, and probably won’t speak to Roger much before or after – whatever happens between them. She’s an old school dressed WOMAN, not a girl, and she expects to be treated with respect. Like the stroppier ones in James Bond films, this woman can kick some ass. And answer back with cutting looks and witty, snappy words.

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Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Other Charlotte Olympia shoes included a suede ankle boot and platform sandals in three colours, black, red, powder pink and ivory. All utterly lust-worthy. Heaven. The colour palette mirrors Emilio de la Morena Autumn/Winter collection, which focuses on black, dark purple and RED. The sombre tones of this show, inspired by the work of the American photographer Francesca Woodman and the circumstances surrounding her suicide in New York, in 1981, aged just 22. Her photographs are hauntingly beautiful and predominantly black and white. Emilio de la Morena wanted to reflect these sad circumstances, with his use of passionate, bruised and mourning colours. These give way however, to ivory and powder pink, making for delicate prettiness, next to the block melancholy. Together, the designs look classy, serious and fantastic. I see these beautiful women by the graves of Italian gangsters, weeping. They are hard, stunning and controlled, but what they love – they adore with all their hearts.

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Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Victoriana also featured within Emilio de la Morena’s collection, but with a modern, sheer twist. Bib decoration and high necklines created from sheer, frayed and tufted organza, make it lighter, sexier and contemporary. The longer length, wool pencil skirts also featured sheer organza. With panels, embroidered in swirling, zig zagging ribbon, created in the material, as well as silk inserts. The additions allowing for fluidity of movement.

The collection felt serious and respectfully attractive. Not flirty, terribly young, overly romantic or precocious. Instead very sensual and confident. The red stole the show. However, like red lipstick on a make up less face, it looked the most alluring, when it was paired with the other other colours. The eyes and lips are too much – alone they are beautiful. Such a bright red needed the other colours to avoid being lost, and to stand out as a solitary statement. And you know, if the three women were sobbing by the grave, each with an accent of red, just imagine… scandalous, stylish, powerful and mysterious RED.

Categories ,Amelia Gregory, ,BFC Catwalk Space, ,Charlotte Olympia, ,Christina Hendricks, ,Emilio de la Morena, ,Faye West, ,Feminine, ,Helen Martin, ,Hot, ,Italian, ,Jessica Rabbit, ,ladylike, ,lfw, ,LFW 2011, ,LFW A/W 2011, ,Mad Men, ,Melancholy, ,photography, ,Red, ,Victoriana

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Amelia’s Magazine | Head Down It’s Sure To Be A Eccentric Night!

This? week? I? attended ?the Light? and? Architecture? symposium? at ?the? Kolding? School ?of? Design ?in ?Denmark. The event played ?host to? one of the forerunners in innovative Textile Design speaker ?Reiko? Sudo ?co? founder? and? director ?of? NUNO ?fabrics.??

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The company have been granted numerous accolades and were recently given the Mainichi? Design? Award, viagra 100mg cure the Roscoe? Prize? and? the? Japanese? Interior? Designers’? Association? Design? Award.? The? talk? focused? on? NUNO‘s? last project?? designing? fabrics? for? the? Mandarin? Oriental? Hotel, side effects ? Tokyo.?

The? project? aim for the Mandarin Oriental was to convey? Japan’s? changing? seasons? and? is? inspired? by the natural elements? of? wood? and? water.? Reiko? explained how? they? applied? traditional? Japanese? handcraft? and fused it with unconventional? materials?. She? took? the? audience? on? a? beautiful? journey? of? Japanese? landscapes? through? the? forest? in? rainfall,? sunshine,? day? and? night.? All? elements? provide? inspiration? for? the? hotel’s? interior? design fabric?, from? the? root? and? texture? of? a? tree,? or? the? way? the? raindrops? bounce? from? leaf? to? leaf,? reflecting? rays? of? sunshine? across? the? forest? floor.? This? allowed? the? audience? to? visualise? the? source? of? inspiration? behind? each ?fabric? and? imagine ?the ?textural ?quality ?of? the ?cloth? without ?the? sense? of ?touch.?

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After? introducing? her? inspirational? source for the fabrics, Reiko went on to? explain the methods of ?production.? For? example? to? recreate? the? beautiful? opalescent? sparkling rays? of? sunshine,? gold? embroidery? was? stitched? onto? transparent? fabric.

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?The atmosphere? of? forest? at nightfall? was? created by? stitching? shiny? metallic? midnight? blue? against? ink? stained? handmade? paper.? This? extra? consideration? to? detail? brings? an ?experiential ?quality ?to ?the ?fabric ?emulating ?a? certain? ambiance.?

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Reiko? was? a? truly? inspirational? speaker;? her? efforts? have? allowed? her? to? stay? true? to? Japanese? traditional? handcraft? whilst? experimenting? with? new? materials? to? create new? possibilities. ?This? visionary? approach? and? impeccable? attention? to? detail? project? an? original? yet honest? representation? of? Japanese ?culture.
Femke De Jong’s illustrations are multi-layered and intensively reworked collages, prostate they often explore the seemingly oppositional subjects of man and machine. She kindly agreed to answer a few of our questions and send us some lovely images to eyeball.

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Can you tell me a bit about yourself?
I am originally from the Netherlands and I lived in Amsterdam for about 10 years before I moved to Bristol 6 years ago. I come from a family of ‘makers’, especially my gran and my mum. I have always been interested in the visual arts, like all kids I spent a lot of time drawing and making ‘stuff’. I used to sit in the attic, reading old books, and especially loved the pictures in my dad’s science encyclopedias.
Also, I was kept back for a year in Kindergarten, the teachers there thought it would be good for me to play for another year.

How would you describe your work?
Surrealist collage, textural, playful, eclectic mishmash, a whiff of antiquety, whimsical.

What mediums do you use to create your illustrations?
A composition of drawings, collage (digital and hand-rendered) of elements and textures, layered up in the computer. I often scan hand-rendered drawings or textures in and work from thumbnails and ideas I make first. When inside the computer, I sometimes print out things again and then work into these prints. I try to keep that ‘organic’, hand-rendered feel in my work.

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Collage is a strong element to your illustrations. What is it about using this technique that interests you?
Working with collage gives me a lot of freedom, to mix different elements and ideas, to get to a ‘concoction’. When I was little I wanted to be an inventor, and in a way I still ‘invent’ illustrations.

Would you say you have certain themes which you visit in your illustrations?
I have always been interested in science, and often include mechanical bits in my illustrations.
I sometimes use it as an metaphore to emphasize the ‘clunky’ relationship between man and machine, or eg. the human doesn’t take responsibility for his/her actions, and acts as if he/she is programmed to do so. Themes like science, and environmental issues interest me.

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Do you think that the fact that you were raised in the Netherlands has affected your work in anyway?
I think my view is from a more ‘Dutch’ angle. I moved here about six years ago and even though I dream in English, Dutch normality is still present in the back of my head. Dutch sayings and expressions often pop up, and I find them visually stimulating. I think they drive a lot of the ideas in my work.
I really appreciate the British sense of humour for it’s absurd and macabre satire, like Monty Python and League of Gentlemen.

Is there a Dutch and an English illustration style?
The Dutch love their very bright colour palette, which is a little too bright for my liking. My colour palette seems to go towards more muted colours.
A lot of illustration in the Netherlands seems to me to be direct, conceptual and design led, and more minimalist whilst British illustration seems to be more romantic and eccentric.
In England, there is a big affection and tolerance of the eccentric, whilst in the Netherlands there is a saying: ‘Act normal, you’re mad enough as you are.’

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How do you like living in Bristol? Have you ever considered living in london like many creatives do?
I live with my boyfriend in a fairly central bit of Bristol. Bristol is a lively student city, there are always plenty of things to do here, as well I know a lot of fellow-illustrators here, like the collective ‘Hot Soup’. I’m actually thinking about living more in the countryside than we do now, so London would be a step in the other direction. Eventhough London is a very good place to be for creatives, and I have concidered moving there in the past, I now use the internet to plug myself, and visit London once every month/two months.

What are you working on at the moment?
This week I am working on a book cover, an editorial and an image that will appear in the book Lucidity.

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What inspires you?
Many things. I’ve been called too eclectic before, but when a friend went to Amsterdam with me, she said: “I understand now where you come from, this place is like one of your collages”. Amsterdam is a melting pot of many cultures, colourful, lively and noisy. There’s lots of nooks and crannies, like an old curiosity shop.
In Amsterdam there is an independence in attitude, and the freedom to be expressive. I love walking around antique shops and flea markets, to get a feel of the old times.

Who are your favourite artists?
The Russian Avant-Garde constructivists like El Lissitzky and Rodchenko for their composition. Henrik Drescher, for his independent style and Paul Slater, because of his absurd and surrealist humour. Also Svankmajer, for his nightmarishly unsettling surrealities. I love Eastern European animation the grimness and absurdity they find in everyday topics. The world around us is sometimes unsettling and by depicting the world in a surreal way and making fun of it, helps.

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How long do you usually work on one image?
It depends. For an editorial I usually work on the ideas and the roughs for a couple of hours, and then a bit longer on the finished piece.
When there’s a deadline, things always get done. When I don’t have the deadline, I revisit work more and things can take longer.

Have you done any commissioned work?
I have done are a book cover for the Bristol short story prize, which they used for the front cover of their quarterly mag. A CD cover for Furthernoise and some editorials for Management Today and Resource.

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What would your dream project be?
In this order: A cover for New Scientist, to design a range of book covers, a series of books for older children.
Any project where I get a lot of freedom, eg. by working with an art editor who isn’t afraid to take risks.

To see more of Femke’s work you’re just one click away from her website. You can also buy a few of her things here.

Saturday saw a hoard of eager revellers descend on the Fym Fyg Bar in Bethnal Green for all the fun of the fair, this well vintage fair that is! You could tell news of the event had travelled far on the grape vine as bargainistas formed a snaking queue outside that, alas, fellow intern Sabrina and I fell victim to. After an exasperating wait we finally entered the vintage emporium, and it certainly was a visual feast as soon as you entered. The first sight to grab my attention was the stunningly nostaligic tea shoppe brought to us by the delightful ladies at Lady Luck Rules Ok! I couldn’t help being hypnotised by the endless array of cakes and beautifully clad tea ladies adorned in 50′s get ups! But determined to embark on my bargain hunt I managed to draw myself away from the alluring cupcakes and straight on to the stalls.

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Highly reminiscent of a sweet shop rabble on a Saturday afternoon everyone was grabbing at the £5 a bag stalls, eagerly stuffing as much in as physically possible. There was a certain skill to this I established, you had to adopt a Tetris style approach to utilise the space to its full capacity. There certainly was enough to satisfy every nostalgic whim, I trawled through rows and rows of 50 and 60s aprons and pretty shift dresses, and then straight on to all the glamour and cabaret of the 70′s and 80′s in all their glittery excesses.

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The Vintage Kilo stall, it has to be said, was my beeline and alas I was disappointed. I think most of Shoreditch had my idea so subsequently it descended into a cattle market, making it all too difficult to delve out those bargains. Maybe I am still a mere vintage fair novice; I think I was dealing with the pros.

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The Jewellery was a real treat, I unearthered some stunning brooches, hat pins and charmingnecklaces, it really was a treasure trove of shimmery trinkets perfect for us magpies. There was also beautiful millinery ablaze with feathers and gems galore, taking us on a whirlwind tour through the roaring 40s to the swinging 60′s. I wished I could pull off some of the more flamboyant styles!

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After more then sufficient vintage indulgence I decided it was definitely time to let my stomach do the talking and succumb to some well deserved tea and cake at Lady Lucks pop up tea shoppe. The décor was delightfully twee and had been consciously laid out to reflect individual decades spanning the 50s to the 80s. We were escorted right back to the 50s table which was brimming with vintage board games. The staples included Sorry, Bingo and Scrabble all definitive games from the era in my book! So after taking in the décor I launched straight into a hearty cup of tea and my delectable chocolate cup cake while my partner in crime went for the carrot cake.

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So in all the consensus was a definite thumbs up for the affordable vintage fair, it’s safe to say I was vintaged out by the end! Keep your eyes out for the next one guys, it’s 25th April in Lincoln, well worth a visit!

Altermodern: Tate Triennial 2009

A multi media visual exploration of Altermodernism. Curated by Nicolas Bourriaud, there the co- founder of Palais de Tokyo in Paris, he describes Altermodern art as art made in today’s global context, a counter reaction to commercialism. The selection includes some of the best current British artist, alongside international artists who are working within similar themes.

Tate Britain Mill bank London SW1P 4RG
3rd Feb – 26th Apr 09 Daily 10am-5.50pm

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BRIDGE 2 WORLDS

The launch and celabration of Indian modern art, curated by Radha Binod Sharma.
The show will feature works by 22 comtemporary Indian artist, some of whom have never exhibited outside of there own country.

Menier Gallery 51 Southwark Street London SE1 1RU
31. Mar – 9. Apr 09, free admission 11am – 6pm daily

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The Mail Me Art Project

Run by Darren Di Lieto

The exhibition showcases a vast collection of artistic work sent in the form of mail by both professional and amateur artists of all ages from across the world as part of the 2007 Mail Me Art project. All of the work submitted to the Mail Me Art project is exhibited and available for purchase.

Red gate gallery
209a Coldharbour Lane Brixton London SW9 8RU
Friday 3rd to 9th of April 2009,
Gallery Opening Hours: Sat, Mon, Tues, Wed: 2.30 pm – 6.30 pm
Last day of Exhibition: Thurs 9th of April: 11.00am to 5.00pm

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Sock Exchange

Through video, events and one-on-one engagement, Sock Exchange invites you to transforming your humble and odd socks into an exquisite art experience.
Also come sit and knit with other fellow knitters/makers. Show non-knitters how to knit their own sock and spread the sock appreciation.

Exhibiting alongside residents from Eyebeam’s Sustainability Research Group, Stefan Szczelkun, Melanie Gilligan.

Fact Gallery, Liverpool L1 4DQ
6th Apr – 12th Apr 09, Free admission 10-6pm

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Crookes is an area of Sheffield popular with students and Joe Cocker pilgrims. One of wikipedia’s key facts about the area is that it is served by the number 52 bus. Be still, medications my beating heart.

But as I type a new band are causing something of a stir there ? it’s home to The Crookes: a baby-faced guitar wielding folk/pop/acoustic outfit. They deliver tender, more about sweet melodies and simple, stripped songs that are a good old fashioned treat for the ears.

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They’ve played a handful of gigs in London recently and are picking up a steady stream of fans, with Steve Lamacq at the front of the line like the Pied Piper of Hamelin, harping on about them on his blog and radio show.

The Crookes have a great stage presence and ooze charisma – without the arrogance associated with a good few of their contemporaries. Hey, they’ll even join you off the stage for a couple of numbers and charm you with their raw, acoustic and unplugged talent if you ask nicely (or not at all, actually). They have an experimental sound, incorporating toy guitars, harmonicas and banjos into their gigs, complimented by lead Goerge’s dulcet vocals.

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We caught up with George, Alex, Daniel and Russell at their recent Stoke Newington gig:

Hailing from Sheffield, people will compare you to it’s famous exports: Artic Monkeys, Pulp, Harrisons, Peter Stringfellow. Help or hinderance?

R: We haven’t been compared to Peter Stringfellow, as yet. The only comparison we’ve really had was to Treebound Story. We stole Richard Hawley’s drum sticks recently (he uses the same studios), though we don’t really want to live up to our name.

What was the last song you recorded and why?

D: By The Seine, which has a bit of a different sound. It’s about a pavement artist I saw who’s pictures kept getting washed away when it started raining. We’re going to be playing it at a live session we’re doing in Paris in the summer… playing there’s always been a big ambition of ours.

What have you got in store for the rest of the year?

G: We’re moving in together to give it a proper go. Apparently our future neighbor is deaf…so at least we can’t annoy him!

A: George wants to be a postman for a while.

Will there be an album?

R: Hopefully in the next year or so…but we want to take our time and make sure when we do it’s reflective of our best efforts.

What’s the best thing about Crookes?

D: It has a nice lake.

G: There’s a great chip shop called ‘New Cod on the Block.’ Actually, I’ve never been ? it might be pretty average, but I like the name.

Any band dramas?

A: Russell once vandalized the dressing rooms at Plug in Sheffield… he was making a cup of tea and pulled the cupboard off the wall..he then spent about 20 minutes trying to fix it before the house manager found out and refused to pay us.

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Do you prefer to perform unplugged or do you prefer to present a more produced sound?

G: Either, really, but we are playing at the Holmfirth Festival of Folk at the beginning of May which is going to be an unplugged set…we’re really looking forward to it.

R: …And we’re going to play an acoustic set on Margate Pier in the summer sometime…we have a thing for playing interesting venues.

You supported Slow Club (friends of Amelia’s magazine). How was that?

A: We’ve all been to see them loads before, so it was great to be on the same bill. They’re one of the current Sheffield bands we really admire.

Which song do you wish you’d written?

A: And Your Bird Can Sing by The Beatles

D: Be my Baby by The Ronettes

What is the most embarrassing song on your ipod/guilty pleasure?

G: Forget about Dre ? Eminem feat. Dr. Dre

R: Mambo No.5 by Lou Bega!
So imagine the most idyllic and serene childhood dream, information pills what does it conjure? Fluffy bears, story tea parties and blue skies. Oh for the naivety of youth, before we all fall foul to the trials and tribulations of adolescence. Well never fear here at Amelia’s Magazine we are here to bring you back your youth, well a slightly revised late night television version! Via innovative new design collaborative Ground Zero.

Hong Kong based brothers Eric and Philip have bombarded onto the London fashion sphere feeding our senses with an explosion of graphics and colour, which makes you feel you are being catapulted straight into a Super Mario Brothers game.

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Ground Zero’s A/W 2009 collection “Lazy Naughty and Sleepy” is epitomised perfectly by its title. It’s a whirlwind tour through apocalyptic nightmares and wistful daydreams embarking on a vivid tour of graphics and shapes. But don’t let me forget to add the abundance of Care Bears in rather compromising situations, some of the prints feature crack smoking and homosexuality, very controversial!

This brother duo has distinctive individual styles, having studied legions away from each other. With Eric studying Graphic Design in Hong Kong while his brother made the break to London to study Fashion at Middlesex University. These distinctly different facets of design unite perfectly within their work, fusing conceptual tailoring with bold graphic design.

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Defying our preconceived ideas on the common practice for pyjama use. The design duo features our favourite comfy Sunday afternoon staple as an integral part of their collection. With cutesy oversized pj’s in an array of confectionary tones from candyfloss pink to parma violet purple. The emphasis on wearabilty is particularly apparent in this collection, with oversized jumpers, joggers, deconstructed macs and t-shirts.

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Having featured in Selfridges, Concrete in London, Le Shop in Stockholm, Ships and And A in Japan, Bauhaus, and D-mop Seibu in Hong Kong. With such an endless array of suppliers it’s safe to saye their eccentric collections are well received in the fashion circuit!
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There’s nothing quite like a nice little story to go alongside a musical out pouring. And there’s no better story than the story of love in the back of an organ donor van. With his ‘F**ken rock opera’; the moving story of Misty and Moufette, hospital Sparky Death Cap plays his beautiful Daniel Johnson/Jeffrey Lewis alt folk odes to love and loss and love again. Like the afore mentioned lo-fi heroes R Taylor (aka Sparky) is also an artist, and his illustrations are projected on to a whiteboard behind him as he strums his ukulele and loops slowly penetrate our ear drums. But the story, tell me the story (you may be saying?), well, briefly : Misty is a van driver delivering organs all over the country who the day before Valentine’s Day meets the beautiful Moufette after a sledging accident. He immediately falls in love but the feelings are not reciprocated, she soon realizes her mistake and they drive off into the sunset (if only love was so simple). The moral that love is worth risking everything for is however a strong one; “A man who loved you sufficiently, to cause a nationwide organ deficiency”.

Love is definitely in the air tonight (well maybe lost love) as headliner Dent May appears on stage singing “I love you more than I did when you were mine”.

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A beautiful melody to an ex-girlfriend, sadly missed and from the way he sings it you can really feel the pain. But let’s not get too forlorn as on a brighter note we hear ‘Howard’ about a one man band from Mississippi and a heart-breaking and re-building rendition of the Doo wop classic by the Four Preps ‘26 Miles (Santa Catalina)’; “The first song I ever learnt on the Ukulele” he tells us.

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Although the venue was downsized at the last minute the night is given a little extra atmosphere, it`s cosy and a real 1950′s lounge experience (complete with crooner) is created and gives us the opportunity speak to Dent one on one, nearly. Quite the personable fellow. With a new album just out on Animal Collectives’ label ‘Paw Tracks‘ it won’t be long before you all become acquainted with him yourselves. Make sure you do it sooner than later, eh?
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When 4, online 000 people converged around The City of London to take part in the G20 Meltdown on April 1st, diagnosis and voice their concerns over the current economic and climate situation, many did not foresee that the protests would not become something altogether more frightening and unsafe. Not unsafe due to violent protesters (it is generally acknowledged that there was only a handful of rioters, who caused a minimum amount of damage), but because of the methods and tactics employed by the police force who surrounded us. Since that day, the general public now are more than familiar with the term kettling, and the protesters are all too aware of what it means to be kettled. The issues which arose from that day have centered on one thing: the British’s police’s misuse of power, and riot – inciting tactics for dealing with protests – however peaceful or non violent the protest may be.

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At best, the day would have provoked a necessary dialogue between the general public, the media, and the police force. Unfortunately, events and actions of the police led to a devastating outcome. Ian Tomlinson, a 47 year old newspaper seller, collapsed and died outside the Bank of England. He had suffered a heart attack. Ian had not even been part of the protests, but was simply trying to make his way home. For the first few days, details of his death were sketchy and many facts seemed to contradict each other. Most reports suggested that it was a simple and unfortunate case of a man having a heart attack, perhaps brought on by the ‘rioters’ around him. Here is the Metropolitan Police’s statement issued a few hours after his death:

“A member of the public went to a police officer on a cordon in Birchin Lane junction with Cornhill to say that there was a man who had collapsed round the corner.
“That officer sent two police medics through the cordon line and into St Michael’s Alley where they found a man who had stopped breathing. They called for LAS support at about 19.30.
“The officers gave him an initial check and cleared his airway before moving him back behind the cordon line to a clear area outside the Royal Exchange Building where they gave him CPR.
“The officers took the decision to move him as during this time a number of missiles —believed to be bottles — were being thrown at them. ?LAS took the man to hospital where he was pronounced dead.”

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The police can no longer hide behind these falsehoods. A video obtained by The Guardian Newspaper clearly shows the man being attacked by a large number of police. The event seems shockingly unprovoked. He is seen walking, with the police, clad in riot gear, trailing him. Hands in his pockets, he is unprepared for the assault. The video makes for highly upsetting viewing. If there was a representation of the police’s senseless and reprehensible treatment of the public on April 1st then this is it. The events in the video could not be more different to the account by the police.

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This Saturday, 8th April, the original organisers of the G20 Meltdown will be leading a procession to protest the death of Ian Tomlinkson. It will assemble outside Bethnal Green Police Station at 11.30am, before setting off at 12 p.m. and laying flowers where he died, close to The Bank Of England. It is suggested that anyone marching wears black. Protesting the polices reprehensible behaviour is the only and best way to send a message to the British police force that their actions are not acceptable and cannot be tolerated in a democratic society.

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(all photographs courtesy of Amelia Gregory)

Go to www.g-20meltdown.org for further details.
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As I sit in the window of House, no rx for all of Camberwell High Street to exhibit, order sipping on a delicious much needed wake up cup of coffee, mind I am awaiting for the gallery below to open. House opened in 2007 and is situated in the little hidden gem of Camberwell. With the Arts College just around the corner, Camberwell is packed with creative and eccentric students most of whom are a credit to the art industry. This café come gallery expresses a welcoming and friendly atmosphere, describing itself as a place to provide artists with a public platform from which to exhibit their work. There is a strong sense of communication from this contemporary set up, as it opens up the chance for the artists to expose their work to the general art audience, and also the community.

The main thing that struck me about House (second to the scrumptious chocolate cookies!), was the encouraging attitude they embrace with regards to supporting emerging artists, whilst also welcoming established artists. Better still, all the profits that are made go towards local community projects that are linked with The Wells Trust. The Wells Trust community support and initiate many charities and projects around the Camberwell and Peckham area, House being there most recent project.

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Upstairs in the coffee shop, House offer a wide range of tea with flavours from your typical English tea to liquorice and peppermint flavour to popcorn! There are old-style board games on hand if you fancy a game of scrabble or dominos, and a chance to find out about up and coming events and exhibitions from in and around the area with many fliers on display. The food served is all homemade, fresh and healthy and the prices are reasonable, reminiscent of the large student community based in the area. The presence is laid back, and the atmosphere is comfortable.

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As I spiralled down the staircase to view the gallery, there was a list of the works guiding you around the small space. Despite being a small space the gallery is currently being occupied by 4 artists, by having the opportunity to give a taster of their work to the art critiques and other members of the population, this is a good foot in the door. The space downstairs for the gallery is very simplistic, nothing fancy, the same with the café. This reflects the fact that all of the profits are given to charity and no money is wasted on unnecessary decorating or purchases. The shop window offers an exhibition space also, which if your art is exhibited here; this offers good exposure, being on a main busy road and all.

Previous exhibitions at House have included the work of recent prints, installations and video works, done by four MA Visual Arts/Printmaking students in February 2009, the work of students studying MA Digital Art in December 2008, five recent graduates of MA Painting and Drawing Courses in October 2008. You can find details of other previous exhibitions at www.house-gallery.co.uk. House also offers a reduced rate of gallery hire for students, making this a more accessible opportunity for them.
Here are some examples of work shown in the gallery since it has been open:

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August 2008 – Ghosts by Michael Hayes

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October 2008 – Beyond the Horizon by Charles Michael Reid, Alastair Gordon, Jonathon Stubbs

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September 2008 – Belonging by Carolyn Lefley

Two coffees later and ready to leave, is when I notice that the quirky attributes of the venue even extend to the toilet, with a number of ‘Where’s Wally?’ posters stuck to the wall for entertainment. Or if you are me, disappointment, as I lost to each poster!

You can find more information on exhibiting your work in House or for up and coming events here. or you can also email at house-gallery@hotmail.com
Calling all avid fashionista’s and artists across the Pennines! I bring you exciting news from Amelia’s Magazine HQ! As always we are not ones for neputism but when we heard news of our Music and Art contributer Simon Lords new project we just couldn’t contain our excitement any longer.

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So without further ado I bring you news hot off the press of the launch of innovative club night Ecentrik. So prepare yourselves for a club night like no other, information pills these guys are preparing to bombard you with art, fashion and music all under the same roof!

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The founder Simon Lord nurtured Ecentric from a mere pipe dream, inspired by the lack of outlets for emerging artists in Manchester the tag team came up with the concept for a trans-functional club night to bring together artists from various facets of design. Granting them a platform to showcase their work while encouraging artists to embark on collaborative projects within the community.

The next event will be taking place on Sunday 12th of April at the Sandbar in Manchester. With a myriad of events going on under one roof it’s hard to know where to start. First off there will be a catwalk show set to the tantalizingly beats of hip local DJs which will showcase the crème de la crème in fashion design in Manchester! One designer showcasing that I am particularly enthused about is environmentally conscious design collaborative JUNK. Utlising recycled materials the brand create original and quirky pieces of vintage inspired clothing. The brand are no strangers to success and are already enjoying a wealth of followers from there Manchester based shop granting them a cult following in the underground fashion sphere. Along with Junk, independent boutique ‘Love Me Again’ will also be gracing the catwalk with their new A/W collections.

Lord is keen to promote and nurture the use of sustainability in both fashion and art, so environmentally conscious design is a theme that resonates throughout the event. Alongside the Catwalk show their will be exhibition space playing host to a whole array of fine artists, photographers and video installations from artists such as Scott Lockhart, Dick Vincent and Dan Amos to name but a few.

So if you thought London was the epicenter of cool then your definitely mistaken, these Manc boys are hot on our collar! Where else would you get a club night for a mere two pounds!

Categories ,Art, ,Club Night, ,Collection, ,Ecentrik, ,Fashion, ,Music, ,Photography, ,Simon Lord

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Amelia’s Magazine | Inspiring New Talent!

IDIOT SON OF STELLA AND GEORGE

An eclectic mix of art work by a group of like minded people exploring expressionism through art.
Peckham Square, tadalafil page 28th of March 2- 6pm

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In the Pines

Jack Strange
Limoncello 2 Hoxton St London, rx opening 27th of March 6.30 – 8.30pm, case exhibition: 26th – 28th of March 11am – 6pm and by appointment until 2nd May 2009.

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Order and Disorder

Wilhelmina Barns-Graham
A look at a very unique collection of paintings and prints, several have never been publicly exhibited before.
Art first in Cork street, 24th March – 23rd April

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One or Several Wolves

Priya Chohan, Coral Churchill, Annelie Fawke, Kwang-Sung Hong, Heidi Locher and Anne E Wilson.
A group of artists look at conceptual motivations within Art, using a variety of media each artist explores the relationship between concept, material and final work created.
Kingsgate Gallery, 20th March – 5th April Free

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Bandits present

New installation work from Glaswegian artists littlewhitehead.
The Bun House Bandits, 96 Peckham High Street London. Preview: 15th March 2009, 4pm. Exhibition: 16th March 2009 – 29 March 2009, 11am–11pm

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Being and nothing-ness

Youngmi Kim, Kiwoun Shin and Seunghyun Woo
Three Korean artists explore the notion of “being” through various multi media methods, the exhibition includes paintings, videos and sculptures.
Nolias Gallery, 60 Great Suffolk St SE1. Private view: 26thMarch at 6pm- 9pm, exhibition: 27th March- 7TH April 200 10:30Am-6pm,

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We are his body

installation art work inspired by the artist’s exploration of the cross in today’s society.
Viewing at Christ Church URC 663 Barking rd Plaistow E13 9EX, 25th March 6pm

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Kate Marshall: Live Painting.

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This dextrous figurative painter will be doing a live drawing and painting gig at Movida, Argyll Street on April 2nd. Arrive at 9.30pm, you might get a free drinky. She’ll be starting work at 10pm. Check out the event on facebook.
I just woke up from the best nightmare I ever had, store at least I think it was a nightmare. I mean, side effects I’ve heard of mutton dressed as lamb and a wolf in sheep’s clothing, health but last night I saw a couple of ladies, dressed as a wolf and a sheep respectively, among other things.

But what was this, what had I stepped into? Well I found the best person to ask, Annie Oldfield. A lovely young lady from Leeds, dressed as a wolf! I thought it would be fun to create a one-off themed party where you can listen to music all night that`s in some way related to animals: Animal Collective (Panda Bear), Deerhunter, Modest Mouse (the list is endless), eat crackers and, of course, what themed party is complete without fancy dresses. Shark, tiger, zebra, duck, crab, swan, cat (there were lots of cats) all had turned out.

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After Annie along with friend Bonnie Wan came up with the idea they went to
DJ/Promoter friend Dave Bassinder (Underachievers) and Filthy animals! was born.

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Not one for getting down on the dance floor, that was no problem here, you could keep yourself occupied by making animal balloons or watching films played on a big screen, obviously starring our fantastic furry friends. Or grab a piece of paper and give origami a go, make some sort of flapping pterodactyl. Of course the term filthy suggests more than balloon modeling so a few cheap drinks and many tunes later and the dance floor got the attention it deserved, well you spend all day making a costume you gotta show it off, right?

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It`s a real shame it had to end as there are no plans for further repercussions. If you read this Underachievers “BRING BACK THE ANIMALS and KEEP EM FILTHY”!
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I have something to admit, viagra sale I am a warehouse party virgin. By warehouse parties I mean not-really legal parties, treat which announce their locations via facebook messages about five minute before they start and you quickly have to get yourself to some remote north London spot in Zone 4. For me there is nothing fun about the obvious issue of trekking all the way out there just for the police to shut it down at twelve. Or 11.30 PM on New Years Eve, rx which is what happened to one of my friends!

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After one of our writers posted about their last exhibition I decided i couldn’t miss the LuckyPDF warehouse party, even better it was all above board and legal. There were rather fancy gold flyers promoting the event and they even hired their own bouncers, who were at the door all night checking ID. While this might take some of the thrill away for regular warehouse party goers I rather enjoyed being somewhere with plumbing and electricity. My favourite part was not having to trail across London to a Saw-esk industrial park, because the event was just off Peckham high street. As the LuckyPDF people boldly proclaimed before the event, “The people of South London shalt need to travel to East London any longer for their Huge Party needs.”

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I arrived at eleven and the queue to get in was absolutely insane, luckly i’d sent a RSVP email, but I still had to wait a good fifteen minutes to get into the rooms even once I was through the main gate. This was no thrown together event, they had obviously put a lot of effort into sound and lighting, which was refreshing and very welcome. As I entered the bottom room floor I was immediately hit with throbbing lights and heavy bass. There were hoards of people, I couldn’t even begin to count how many attended the event, but nothing was too serious. I think something about the fact it was in a warehouse just made the whole event more relaxed, there was a lot less people there just to smoke and be seen than there were people just wanting to have fun. No “this is the dance floor, this is the bar” locations usually explicit in gig venues meant people were just doing what they wanted where they wanted.
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The LuckyPDF warehouse party aimed to be “a rampant music/art extravaganza that will continue til the early morn..” The music was definitely there with the order of the day being, “Bass, Bass, Garage, Electro, Bass, Drum n Bass, Swing, Tango, Nintendocore and Bass”. There were Dj sets from 10 PM – 4AM from South London party circuit favourites, XXX, My Panda Shall Fly and Tomb Crew, plus many, many more. These Dj’s were well selected and well received (apart from whoever kept cutting tracks short in the top room!) effortlessly mixing cutting edge bass tracks with forgotten classics.

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However, I was completely perplexed about the other bit, you know the art. Unless really, really small (microscopic) art has come in fashion since the last exhibition I went to I would swear that there wasn’t any. It could have been hidden by the hoards of people there, but still if you’re going to advertise art it would be helpful if people could see it. Previously this would have annoyed me, but I feel i’m just starting to get the point of collectives such as LuckyPDF and it’s peers. Although these guys are artists, they’re not together to try and promote a certain type of art or medium over any other. With the exception perhaps being Off Modern who have a whole Off Modern manifesto on their website. As far as I know there is no particular theme or common interests in the work of the organisers of these events and if there were it would be purely incidental. It’s more a case of getting people excited about South London. Which something that hasn’t happened since (dare i say it) the YBA’s, and they all rushed off to live in the East End or houses in the country as soon as they could anyway.

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I will forgive the LuckyPDF guys just this once having an event light of the art and heavy on the music (which draws people in and allows them to charge entry fee), because they have stated that they’re a not for profit organisation, and I hope the money they made will be going into more exhibitions. And when they do I’ll be there, pen in hand, because I can’t wait to see what they’re going to do next.
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Photography by Ted Williams

Monday 23th

The Rakes
release their third album, symptoms KLANG, buy information pills today and to celebrate the band will play a special gig at London’s Rough Trade East at 6pm tonight.
The follow up to ‘Ten New Messages’ is pure and the best of The Rakes as you can check out on lead track ‘1989‘.
Wristband collection 1 hour prior to gig, first-come-first-served basis-one per person.

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The Rakes

Tuesday 24th

It`s crunch time at The Social and the venue welcomes Kid Carpet to promote his new single, followed by Moonfish Rhumba with their electro beats and peculiar lyrics.
If great music is not enough to take your mind of recession, this month the venue provides the Crunch Time Rant where you can take your anger to the stage, step on to a soapbox and speak out your thoughts.
Doors 6pm, 99p.

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Moonfish Rhumba

Wednesday 25th

Hoxton Square Bar & Kitchen receives Joseph Mount, aka Metronomy and DJs, including the opulent pop of Your Twenties (whose harmonious frontman is Metronomy’s former bassist).
8pm, £7, adv £6.

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Metronomy

Thursday 26th

Plugs, My Tiger My Timing and Shock Defeat at the Paradise By Way Of Kensal Green for a bit of electro/disco rock.
7:30, £7, adv £5.

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My Tiger My Timing

Friday 27th

The three new yorkers forming The Virgins land in town for some dance rock at Koko London.
9:30pm, £7, £5 before 11pm, concs £4.

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The Virgins

Saturday 28th
Up for some healthy girlie pop? Betty and the Werewolves bring their female fronted indie-ditty-pop vocals (they do count with one boy on the drums!) to Bardens Boudoir next Saturday.
8pm, £6.

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Betty and the Werewolves

Sunday 29th
Close (or begin?) your week with the Society of New Music – an avant garde event featuring Wet Dog live at The Social.
7pm, £2.

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Wet Dog

To all you vintage addicts I bring you salvation!

On April the 4th a vintage bonanza will be hitting the streets of Bethnal Green to bombard you with their scandalously cheap vintage, viagra 40mg so prepare yourself Shoreditch! I understand if you are dubious, case “what makes it unique in comparison to the endless array of oversaturated vintage fairs and markets in London” I hear you say? Well, the differentiation is that at this event you won’t be leaving empty handed if you left the house with a mere twenty pounds. This is vintage on an extremely tight shoestring, for any savvy shopper the affordable vintage fair is akin to the sensation of being a child in a sweet shop again!

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Heralded as the largest vintage fair in north England, the organizers have delved the nation with their noble quest for affordable vintage, leaving no stone unturned. Our loyal travellers have unearthed hidden gems and want to bring you the fruits of their labour! So cast aside the idle and banal window shopper, let your hair down and embrace your style hungry primordial urges. The fair is an emporium of vintage wonderment; there are style advisors, a customisation and alternations area, swapping area as well as bundles of vintage clothes and furniture.

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But the most exciting element of the fair has to be the pay by kilo vintage stall. This really is vintage paradise; trawl to your heart’s content safe in the knowledge it’s not going to cost you much more then your weekly grocery shop. The phenomena is commonplace with our European counterparts, but kilo shopping will be making its debut here in the UK. So get trawling and scout some hidden gems, this might just be your chance to revive your wardrobe from the brink of darkness and inject a whole new burst of life. What other chances would you get to weigh out your clothes, just like you would weigh out your sugar?

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They have catered for your every whim feeding your ears and taste buds with a nostalgic trip down memory lane. With music spanning the decades from the bohemian 60s to the energetic 80s, not forgetting a whole host of cake stalls and beverages to whet your appetite.

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So don’t miss out, get down there 11am pronto on the 4th of April, I for one will be installing my vintage bargain radar and heading down myself!
Everyday at the office here, treatment while we`re writing our articles and drinking our teas, we try to go through the many cd`s we receive daily and now and then there`s one that catches everybody`s attention, making everyone in the room ask “who`s this”?
That`s exactly what happened when Cari put on the single from up and coming group My Tiger My Timing. In less than 30 seconds heads were bopping and legs were shaking unanimously. This Is Not The Fire is so catchy that I`ve been listening to it non stop since Tuesday.

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They play a delightful, totally danceable afro beat, electro-pop and still they compare themselves with bands like Metronomy and Casio Kids. While most of the groups desperately run away from extreme pop and commercial tracks, MTMT does exactly the opposite, recognizing their will for creating easy listening and fluid beats.

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The foursome was formed in 2008 in south east London and their debut single was produced by Andy Spence of New Young Pony Club and will be released April 6th 2009 downloadable through Silver Music Machine.

Tuesday I had the chance to see them live at Cargo and I`m definitely looking forward to the entire album, it was quite an electrifying performance. Here`s a little video of the last song:


Yesterday, buy a few of the Amelia’s Magazine girls went along to witness the G20 protests in the City of London. The day had dawned to brilliant sunshine, and clear blue skies, which meant that the sight and sound of the police helicopters hovering overhead was even more pronounced. The events which were due to unfold promised to be extraordinary, and I was keen to see what was going to happen. It was hard to know what to expect, but here was the run down. Four different carnival parades, were to converge around the Bank Of England, and protest the current economic and environmental climate. We were guided there by the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, leading the processions from four rail stations. We were setting off from Liverpool Street, led by the Green Horse – representing climate chaos. Walking from Brick Lane to the station, I was struck at how different the city seemed. Spitalfields Market, and all the restaurants around it were closed. There were not many city workers around, but those who were out and about were dressed down. I didn’t see a single suit around me.

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G20protests4.jpgThe Barbican towards The Bank of England. It was enjoyable to be part of such a good natured crowd and it was fun to watch all the shop owners standing outside their establishments, watching with fascination at the colourful carnival proceeding past them.

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As we walked towards Bank we passed Northern Rock. Some clever jokers had hung a sign inside their office entitled ‘We Love Money”. As I went to take a picture they hastily pulled the sign down. I could only marvel at the thoughtlessness of that statement, wasn’t it hundreds of thousands of pensioners money that they had lost – was that the money in question that they loved so much? After a brief stop, we marched into the space around The Bank Of England. I was shocked by the amount of people who were here. Estimates at 4,000 are not an exaggeration. The place was packed. Having only ever seen this section in London as a thoroughfare for busy, frantic city workers, and crammed to the gills with buses, it was surreal to see it filled with so many protesters. No cars, just people.

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After about 45 minutes, we were ready to head back to the office. I went to walk past a row of police and quickly found that I couldn’t get through. Not quite understanding the situation I was unconcerned, thinking that they were guarding just one exit. Knowing there were plenty more exits around Bank station we wandered back to the road that we had come in on. Again, we were met with a throng of police. They stood arms locked. Still assuming that this was something that would be resolved soon, we sat down and scrounged some crisps off a girl sat next to us. (Not expecting to be there for long, we didn’t take any food, and not much water.)

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Then some of the police vans next to us started to move through the police and drive away. We thought that this was our cue to leave as well, and strode towards the police. They immediately closed ranks. It was at this moment that I took in the situation. They had cordoned us all in; we had unwittingly become kettled. (This word now chills me to the bone). No one was going anywhere without their say so. the crowds started to fill up and began asking questions. As I was nearest the front I asked how long this situation would last for. “Don’t know” came the response. Many people started asking why this was happening, but the police would not respond. Our crowd was large, and there was not an ‘anarchist’ in sight. Many tried to squeeze towards the police and told them that this was violating their human rights, and was against the law. Again, no response.

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We were soon packed so tightly that it was like being at the front of a gig, but instead of watching a band, we were staring into the hard faces of men who refused to talk to us, and would sooner beat and arrest us then let us get past them. At this point the crowd surged and we fell into each other. The police shouted at us “Get back!” a woman shouted “Where to?!” We were trapped in a scrum, and the police were pushing us back while we were being pushed forward. I saw riot police walk towards us and I felt a surge of panic. We had been trapped by the police and there was nothing that we could do. I pleaded with the officer in front of me to let us go (I can now see how futile that was). I said that we were scared, and asked if a riot were to kick off, who are they going to protect? “I can’t answer that” was the response. Women started shouting that they had children from school to pick up, jobs to get to. The most common cry to the police was “Why won’t you speak to us?” I got so fed up from this feeling of powerlessness that I phoned the news desk at BBC News. I shared my feelings of worry to the reporter on the other end of the phone; and told her the scenario. I relayed what the officers had told one girl to do who said that she needed the toilet – “you can go in the street”; what they told one boy who said that he wasn’t even part of the protest – “You are now”. The BBC reporter told us that this situation was happening at every exit of the march. She said, “You are all being tarred with the same anarchist brush, this is their tactic”.

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Around an hour later, still in the same position, a man passed out in front of me. He had been standing quietly, not trying to defy the police, and his only movement for the two hours that we were held was to quietly read a peace of paper that he had in his hands. I had looked at it at one point and could see that it was a Psalm. Thankfully, the officers took him away and led him to an ambulance. Just as I started to feel that it was going to be an all night cordon, my friends phone rang. A friend of hers told her that they had just opened one of the exits round the corner and we bolted for it. Walking to the tube, we were jumping up and down with exhilaration. We began receiving updates that the RBS building was being stormed, and that the police were beating protesters. What had started off as a peaceful and well meaning protest was quickly turning into something much darker, but who was at fault? If you asked anyone in the 4,000 strong crowd they would have no trouble telling you. The police’s tactic of kettling us, purposely providing us with no information and locking us in for two and half hours was easily going to generate the mayhem that they had predicted. Nonetheless, I am so pleased that I attended. It was always going to be an interesting day, I just wish that the peaceful protesters would have been treated better and not denied their basic human rights.
Monday March 23rd.

WE CAN postcards to Ed Miliband and MPs: Monday 23rd March
 

On Monday 23rd March, pills hundreds of children dressed as endangered animals will write postcards to Secretary of State Ed Miliband and to their MPs, in an effort to make the government call a halt to plans to build a third runway at Heathrow and a new coal-fired power station at Kingsnorth.
 
According to NASA scientist James Hansen, who is now advising President Obama, up to 400 species of animals are threatened with extinction by the emissions from Kingsnorth.
 
Filmmaker, mother of three and founding member of WE CAN, Rebecca Frayn said, ‘The children are horrified that so many animals could be wiped out. Ed Miliband has said that carbon capture and storage will be introduced to clean up the emissions, but nobody knows when, or if the technology is even practical.’
 
The postcards will be coloured in and presented after a gathering in Old Palace Yard at 5pm on Monday 23rd March. Several MPs including Andy Slaughter and John McDonnell have agreed to meet children in the lobby of the House of Commons

WECANprotest.jpgForests and Climate Change: an Amazonian Perspective for Copenhagen
Date: Tuesday, 24 March, 2009 – 17:30
Chatham House?
10 St James’s Square
?London
?SW1Y 4LE

A joint IIED and Chatham House event, the debate will be led by Professor Virgílio Viana, Director General, Amazon Sustainability Foundation.
Doors open 5.30pm?Event starts 6.00pm?Reception to 8.30pm
Venue:?email: Alessandra.Giuliani@iied.org Tel: 0207 388 2117

Professor Virgílio Viana is one of Brazil’s leading academics and practitioners on forestry, environment and sustainable development. Prof. Viana served as Secretary of State for Environment and Sustainable Development, Amazonas, Brazil, between 2003 and 2008. He stepped down from the position of Secretary of State for Environment and Sustainable Development, Amazonas, in March 2008 in order to devote his time to new challenges and projects. He is currently the Director General of the new Amazon Sustainability Foundation, and is presently in London as part of a 3 month sabbatical with the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED).

Wednesday 25th March

St James’s Church
197 Piccadilly
London W1J 9LL?
7.00pm
GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT FORUM – Governments; friends or foes of development?
Contact 020 7734 4511 for further details

Thursday 26th March

RICH MIX
35 – 47 Bethnal Green Road, London, E1 6LA

BOX OFFICE:
020 7613 7498

OFFICE/ADMIN:
020 7613 7490

info@richmix.org.uk
www.richmix.org.uk

The Age of Stupid (PG)
Genre: Drama/Documentary
Dir: Franny Armstrong

The Age Of Stupid is the documentary-drama-animation hybrid from director Franny Armstrong (McLibel, Drowned Out) and Oscar-winning Producer John Battsek (One Day In September, Live Forever, In the Shadow of the Moon).

Oscar-nominated Pete Postlethwaite (In The Name of the Father, Brassed Off, The Usual Suspects) stars as an old man living in the devastated world of 2055. He watches ‘archive’ footage from 2008 and asks: why didn’t we stop climate change when we had the chance?
Plus Q+A with
Thurs 26 March after 6.45pm screening- Lizzie Gillet (The Age of Stupid film producer)

Forests and Climate Change,
7pm, Royal Geographical Society,
1 Kensington Gore, SW1 London

The world’s forests are home to an extraordinary range of species, and are arguably one of our greatest safeguards against climate change. Yet deforestation, whether for timber, farming or human settlement, continues at an alarming rate.
Climate Change, Canopies, and Wildlife
Dr. Mika Peck, University of Sussex
What are the impacts of climate change on the cloudforests of north-west Ecuador? Are existing reserves in one of the richest and most diverse of all biodiversity hotspots big enough to protect large charismatic mammals like the spectacled bear and big cats? How much do carbon offset programmes really benefit wildlife? Can technology such as Google Earth help us to identify canopy tree species and biologically diverse areas from space? These are just some of the questions that will be addressed during this lecture, which is based on data collected by Earthwatch volunteers in the mountains of Ecuador.

Dr. Mika Peck, Dr. Dan Bebber. Info: Earthwatch/ 01865) 318856/ events@earthwatch.org.uk

Friday 27th March

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(illustration courtesy of Aarron Taylor)

“Hell and High water: Climate Change as a spiritual challenge.” An evening talk with Alastair McIntosh

6.30pm drinks & light buffet at Gaia House, (18 Well Walk, Hampstead, NW3 1LD)
7.30pm Talk & discussion at Burgh House (Opposite Gaia House, New End Square, Hampstead, NW3 1LT)

Alastair McIntosh’s recent book, “Hell and High Water: Climate Change, Hope and the Human Condition” has been described on Radio 4′s Open Book programme as one of the best on climate change “because of its rage and optimism.” But Alastair’s “optimism” is not of a conventional type that relies on political, technical and economic solutions. His book is about hope, and how our response must also be psychological and spiritual. During the course of this evening, Alastair will introduce the book exploring why he thinks climate change is as much about our inner lives as outer realities, and discuss here this leaves us as campaigners for change. 

Saturday 28th March 2009
 “Climate Change, Consumerism and the Decolonisation of the Soul.”

10am – 4.30pm at the Gaia Learning Centre
18 Well Walk, Hampstead, NW3 1LD

Alastair will build on his presentation from the previous evening, focussing in particular on the role that consumerism plays as the driving force of climate change. He will unpack the history of consumerism and demonstrate how it has “colonised the soul” in an addictive manner, that needs to be responded to in a manner akin to other addictions. This will bring us back to the need, discussed the previous evening, to understand climate change as a call to deepen our inner lives, as well as come up with outer solutions. Many of these solutions will touch on the need for “Rekindling Community” – the title of his other recent book (a Schumacher Briefing) which he will introduce in the latter part of the workshop. 

Alastair McIntosh is a writer, broadcaster and campaigning academic best known for his work on land reform on Eigg, in helping to stop the Harris super quarry; also for pioneering human ecology as an applied academic discipline in Scotland. He is a Fellow of Scotland’s Centre for Human Ecology, a Visiting Fellow of the Academy of Irish Cultural Heritages at the University of Ulster, and in 2006 was appointed to an honorary position in Strathclyde University as Scotland’s first Visiting Professor of Human Ecology. He is the author of many books, including the critically acclaimed “Soil and Soul: People versus corporate power“. 

Booking for either the talk, workshop, or both is essential.  Evening talk £10 / One-day workshop £45. 
Reserve your place online at: www.gaiafoundation.org 
Or send a cheque made payable to The Gaia Foundation. 

For further details contact Vicky at: vicky@gaianet.org or 020 7428 0055. 

Put People First march for Jobs, Justice and the Climate
11am Victoria Embankment, London

Please come along and add your voice to the Put People First march for Jobs, Justice and the Climate in London on Saturday 28th March.
Global leaders are meeting in London on 2nd April for the G20 meeting, and we want them to Put People First and focus on jobs, justice and the climate.
Greenpeace is one of the 50 organisations supporting the march, which is calling for — among other things — a green new deal to help rebuild the economy and create green jobs. To see the full list of demands visit www.putpeoplefirst.org.uk.
Put People First is a coalition of organisations ranging from environmental and development charities to unions, churches and mosques, and we are expecting thousands of people from all walks of life to take to the streets and send a strong message to the G20 leaders. If you can make it to London, please join them.
The march will start at 11am at Victoria Embankment and head to Hyde Park for a rally with speakers and entertainment including comedian Mark Thomas and environmentalist Tony Juniper. Visit the website for more details including a route map.
We’re sorry if you’re not based in or around London and can’t make it, but if you do want to travel down for the march, Put People First are organising coaches from various places around the UK. 
Hope to see you there,
http://www.putpeoplefirst.org.uk/
 
Timothy M Duong is a fine artist searching for something extra ordinary to put “the ordinary on blast”. He as no interest in the ideal beauty, pilule finding that painting from life poses a challenge that often results in mistakes which can change simple art works into timeless pieces. This week I had a chance to find out what inspires his creativity.

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What inspires you?

People inspire me. The space around us inspires me. What fills that space and our relationships to it inspire me. Anything that sparks a resonance inside of me to ask the question “why” is probably the reason why I continue my work. So I guess you could say what I am making at the current moment is a documentation of how I perceive the world or my view of it and this is constantly changing as for my work also.

How did you get into Art?

My cousin who passed away several years ago introduced me to comic book art when I was very young and for years until high school that was all I was doing. While I was deep into the world of comics and the linear art, cure I bumped into “Kabuki” a book written and illustrated by David Mack and that was probably one of the most pivotal points in my artistic development. I didn’t even know that it was possible to bring such a way of communication with such a medium as comics. From then and there I abandoned comics and ventured into fine art.

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Who do you aspire to be like and who inspires you at present?

I really don’t aspire to be like anyone. I aspire to be more my self, if that can be an answer. People that do inspire me at the moment are artists like Phil Hale, Alex Kanevsky, Lucian Freud, Francis Bacon, Degas, Egon Schiele, Richard Diebenkorn and anyone that has a way with the brush and pencil.

Where do you see yourself in 5 years from now?

I see myself living comfortably from what I love doing. I can’t really put it any others words other than that…but I guess we’ll see how the economy goes eh.

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What advice would you give to someone trying to get into the Art?

My advice would be to have an open-mind and be forgiving of your mistakes, yet be your harshest critique. Our experiences are what makes us and to be afraid of consequences generated by our “experience” is to neglect ourselves. It’s all about trial and error in my book.

Do you have a muse?

I have no muse. Although I do hire models and try to work with some friends but no one on a regular basis, at least for now. I need constant change and revision so for me to have a regular muse would probably bore me, but you never know…maybe I haven’t found the “one”.

Jeremy is self-obsessed. Jeremy is pop. Jeremy overdoes things. Gratuitously. Jeremy indulges ostentatious musical whims. And Jeremy has just made his first great piece of work: How We Became is his masterpiece.
I’ve been checking out this half-French fop’s work for a few years, click since I caught him at one of the Mystery Jets’ Eel Pie Island Bandpies, site spooling tales of rentboys and such, side effects strumming his guitar, while his voice fought for attention. Interesting stuff, but not compelling. Then he progressed, churning out a couple of decent tunes, like 5 Verses. He was obviously a talented chap, but I couldn’t obsess over what felt to me like dry and bloodless songs. Jeremy, where’s your passion? I asked. And then I went and listened to something else.
Imagine my surprise then, putting on this CD and being forced to let Jeremy fully into my heart. He is the same Jeremy, but more knowing, now. There is a lot of really beautiful music here, as though he’s been suddenly possessed by the spirit of Brian Wilson in his prime. There are chord progressions that tighten tendons, and make you want to do some parkour in a balletic frenzy.
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He’s also very canny at matching lyric to music. “I heard that it’s true that everything is made of tiny bits of nothing. There’s music in the gaps and colour in the cracks, as the sirens wail and car alarms ring” is delivered so delicately in Waiting Room, a lullaby of electronic drums and oboes and flutes. You can’t help but become as soppy as the man himself.
The record is very much a studio thing. It sounds as if he’s laid everything out to click track, layered in his keyboards and vocals, then got his servants to fill in their designated parts, with utter precision and exactitude. There isn’t a slid or bent note, not even a spaghetti hoop of a solo. The only emotional expression on the whole CD comes from Jeremy’s uncannily skilful songwriting, and his boyish note-perfect vocal squeaks, whimpers, and entreaties. It’s testament to the power of those factors that they’re enough to keep you in for the whole shebang.
There are some surprisingly rocked-out moments, too. Just slipped into the mix. Jeremy still warbles on top, the ghost of the click track still hovers, but just with distorted guitar riffing away and driving drums pounding a strange imitation of rock bands. The rest of the time, we are left with a world of synths, round bass tones, gentle acoustic guitar samba-chords, robo-tight drumbeats, and really sexy wind instruments. Check the stunning horns on Dancing with The Enemy. And production about as perfect as it gets.
I must admit my mind started to wander as the last track drawled into verse three and a half, and then I realised why it had to be the last track. A sequence of pure musical wizardry divides the song in two. Debussy duetting with King Crimson, followed by a one minute piano and snare crescendo. “What a surprise! We grew up,” realises Jeremy. Truly.
This isn’t an experimental record, at all, but I’m still fairly stumped for unqualified comparisons. Let’s try, err… The Divine Comedy, but no… it’s more earnest. Fugu, but no… less ironic. Or Patrick Wolf, maybe, but no… much less masturbatory. Essentially, this is its own beast. That’s what makes it great. Jeremy Warmsley’s vision has finally borne fruit. Very juicy fruit.

You can buy “How We Became” through roughtrade.com, and there’s a free download of “If He Breaks Your Heart” on his own site, jeremywarmsley.com. See him live at Barden’s Boudoir this Saturday, March 28,, when he plays alongside Betty and The Werewolves, or on his tour of the UK and Germany, as listed on his myspace.
Tatty Devine are so prolific it’s hard to keep up – legions ahead of their counterparts who must surely feel as though they are lugging behind them gasping for breath. Never ones for being complacent, pharm Tatty Devine are consistently striving to push the boundaries in accessory design.

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The innovative duo have enjoyed a cult following, web and their list of collaborators is long enough to struggle in the recollection. There was the infamous Gilbert and George, the master craftsman Robert Ryan, eccentric electric group Robots in Disguise, and then the zany Mark Pawson. Not to mention their bizarre projects. One of their latest was undertaking a pendant replica of the angel of the North. As a proud Northern lady myself, this holds a particular sentimental place in my heart!

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Tatty Devine have recently joined forces with artists Phil and Galia Kollectiv in a conceptual project for their Brick Lane store. The exhibition comprises of a series of photographs to coincide with the launch of their capsule jewelry collection. Inspired by Cold War Design, the pieces play with the concept of espionage and the clash between ideology and human emotion.

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The collection has a distinct three-dimensional allusion, drawing influence from emissary tools used within the Second World War. The pieces range from acrylic brooches to pendants, my distinct favourite would have to be the pendant of Oskar Schlemmer a prestigious figurehead in the Bauhaus theatre workshop.

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So head on down and catch the collection at the Brick Lane store which runs till May 3rd

In conjunction with their work with minimalist duo Kollectiv, Tatty Devine has been dipping their toes into the world of music. Their latest collaboration is with new kids on the indie block Betty and the Werewolves. This quartet are bursting with flair, injecting a healthy dose of saccharine laden pop. But don’t discard these girls as entirely sickly sweet, they pack a real punch. With racing punk rock guitars and scandalous lyrics these girls don’t adhere to the usual pop group ethic.

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The accessory collection comprises of bold graphic pendants rather reminiscent of the font of an 80s action comic, you almost expect the words POW! The red acrylic pendant is gloriously kitsch, a perfect outlet to announce your passion for these cool cats to the unsuspecting public. Their next piece pays homage to 70s star David Cassidy, which aptly is the title of the bands debut album. This charming heart pendant is a perfect piece of 70s nostalgia.

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With the prices starting from a mere £15 pounds, now is your chance to grab yours. I have a sneaking suspicion these girls will be making waves in the music sphere in the foreseeable future. Infact they will be playing this Saturday at Bardens Boudior with Jeremy Warmsley, The Duloks, and the Bobby McGee’s, a perfect chance to experience this energic bunch first hand.
Like it or not (and I bet they don’t), dosage the Government are now being hit from all sides over the issue of Climate Change. Yesterday, approved the harsh criticism came from a determined and impassioned group of kids dressed as lions, tigers and polar bears who stood outside Parliament and protested the plans for new coal fired power stations, and the building of Runway Three at Heathrow Airport. It was a double-whammy kind of point. First, the children wanted to show that they too are as concerned as any group of adults about the issues of global warming, and want their voices to be heard too. Secondly, they wanted to represent the many animals who face extinction if climate change isn’t halted. And who can say no to a kid dressed up as a polar bear?

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Thankfully, the dire rainstorm which had threatened to send everyone running cleared and made way for blue skies. I pitched up at around 4.30pm to find more police standing around then children. Being fully aware of the planned protest, there were quite a few clusters of armed police standing guard. Is that justifiable when you consider that the event consisted of under 10 year olds singing “We’ve got the whole world in our hands” while they threw an inflatable globe around? I’m not so sure.

wecankids2.jpgSipson, near Heathrow, whose primary school will be demolished if Heathrow’s third runway goes ahead. (I especially liked their teacher who instructed her pupils to wriggle their bums at Parliament). So while this seemed like a light hearted affair, the message was serious. Especially as these are the type of age range who will have to deal with the devastating impact of global warming.

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Several MP’s came along to show solidarity, including environmental campaigner and editor of The Ecologist, Zac Goldsmith. His speech highlighted the disparities between other countries commitment to using alternative energy and our country. An example he gave was the town of Marburg in Germany, which requires all homes and renovation project built to be fitted with solar systems – a policy which has means that this small town produces more solar energy than the whole of Britain.

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Once the kids/polar bears had done a few photo-calls, they trooped off on mass into Parliament. The aim being to meet and tell their MP’s they want two things – No new coal fired power stations unless CO2 is captured and stored, and no aviation expansion. What we weren’t planning on was being made to wait outside for 45 minutes while each parent and child was given the same stringent screening of their bags and clothes that is usually reserved for suspicious looking men boarding planes. For any other group this would have been tolerable, but there seemed something especially pedantic about doing this to a mass of children who were doing their very best to stand patiently in icy winds.

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The guards had no intention of speeding up the process, even for the children who were getting cold, tired, and letting us all know how much they needed the loo. I stuck around too. Even though it was absolutely freezing, I knew that if these children could give up their tea time to wait for three quarters of an hour to meet their MP’s then so can I!

By the time I got in, the kids had disbanded to every section of Parliament, so it was hard to keep track of them. I spotted a couple of kids who looked like they were at the end of a long day, and the only option left was to slide through the lobby. I was so envious.

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Talking with the organisers later, I was heartened to hear that the several politicians came down to meet and talk with the children, including Simon Hughes, Glenda Jackson, Andy Slaughter and John McDonnall. The protest appeared to have fired them up, because the kids were all eager to talk about the realms of global issues which were affecting them. I have heard politicians claim many times that young people are apathetic to governmental policies, and I hope that Monday’s protest showed them how wrong they are.
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Yet again I have been utilising the joys of the World Wide Web, information pills the latest hidden gem to grab my attention is gifted photographer Cari Ann Waymen. It’s a wonder this lady has lasted so long undetected on our radar; at the tender at of 20, ampoule Waymen has talent that precedes her years.

A self professed novice she has never taken a single photography class. Subsequently her work exudes a naïve expressionism deriving purely from her love for capturing ambiance. Not tainted by over processing, viagra approved her pieces portray all the distilled qualities of 70′s cinematography.

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I caught up with Waymen in the far- flung realms of the other side of the pond for a quick email interview.

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Tell me a bit about yourself Cari?
Hi, my name is Cari Ann Wayman, but a lot of people know me as “yyellowbird.”. I currently live in chicago, illinois, but I have a hard time picturing myself staying anywhere for long. I love taking pictures so much i’m afraid to take it seriously, so much that I call it “taking pictures” instead of “photography”. I would like to be an explorer in the most victorian sense of the word, my interests include abandoned buildings, russian royalty, the beautiful and strange, wilderness and ruins, carnivals and the moon.

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??How do you find all those abandoned buildings??
Just wandering around, the amount of abandoned buildings has a lot to do with the area you’re in, if you’re in a nice, big, wealthy city, you’re not going to find much. But mostly I just keep my eye open for them whenever i’m out, make a note, and come back later. Eventually you develop a sort of sixth sense for it. (note: i do not recommend or endorse anyone breaking and entering or otherwise disobeying the law to get inside of these places, what I do myself has nothing to do with what I think you should do, so if you get caught, don’t blame me!)

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What sort of camera do you use in your work?

?A nikon d50, truthfully I don’t know much about cameras, I really only use the most basic of capabilities on my camera, I prefer to be expressive in different ways.

What lenses do you use??
Just the one my camera came with, so pretty standard. I don’t know what kind it is or anything.

How do you get those light spots on your pictures?
?I take a broken image of faraway lights at night and overlay them in photoshop.

You use of colour is particularly interesting, is the blanched effect achieved through digital altering?
?Yes my work is highly digitally altered, but all I do is slightly change colour/saturation/brightness/contrast settings in photoshop.

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Your work seems heavily inspired by hazy 70s cinematography, are you inspired by films in your work?
Actually, I don’t watch very many films, I have a hard time sitting still long enough to sit through a whole movie! But I would like to maybe make films one day. I am very inspired by music though that evokes that similar dreamy nostalgic qualities to it, if that makes sense?

What other photographers have inspired you?
I really try to keep myself as influence-free as possible. I like to look at other photographers’ work sometimes, of course, but I want my work to come strictly from my head..

What do you aim to achieve from your photography?
Oh, I don’t really know! I’m not dim enough to think i’m going to change the world or anything, but at the same time I think there’s secretly a tiny part of me that hopes for that. I don’t know, it’s not like i have this agenda or message or concept i’m forcing on the mases. If I just want to make beautiful things and hope they affect someone in even the smallest way.

What is your main stimulus when your seeking out locations to shoot?
Location is one of the most important things in my pictures. I’m always in this mindset where i’m looking at everything as a potential picture. I just wander around all the time and think, “oh that should be in a picture! that too!” wandering is sort of my hobby, and I think after awhile, you develop this sixth sense for special wonderful places.

Categories ,artist, ,Cari Ann Waymen, ,photography

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Amelia’s Magazine | James Small: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Menswear Catwalk Review


James Small A/W 2012 by Krister Selin

Last season I got myself into a bit of a state at the James Small show, solely because fashion superhero Kate Moss was in attendance. Apparently the Mossinator and Small are BFFs, so it was no surprise when I entered the Fashion Scout venue to find all sorts of camera-wielding maniacs. Everybody had a look of acute desperation, and as I tried to decide where to sit to get a good photograph OF THE CLOTHES THAT WE’D COME TO SEE, it soon became clear that it might be impossible.


James Small A/W 2012 by Lorna Leigh Harrington

It was mental. People stood on the catwalk brandishing their cameras whilst producers gave lectures of a ‘STRICTLY NO PHOTOGRAPHS OF KATE‘ nature. Despite this, fashionos shuffled in their bags to dig out every possible photograph-taking device they had – iPads, iPhones, Blackberries, Disposables – you name it, they wielded it. I could feel myself getting more and more irate, mostly because I knew I wouldn’t be able to even catch a glimpse of her. It was pretty evident when she arrived – the room fell deadly silent and then hushed whispers echoed around the grand hall. Thankfully the ordeal ended there. When Kate’s in, we’re off.

I do love the alternative catwalk in the Freemason’s Hall, it has something a bit more ‘fashion’ about it, but the lighting isn’t particularly brillballs so apologies in advance for my substandard photographs.

James presented another small but perfectly formed collection. Entitled ‘Dark Arctic‘, James, like many others on Menswear day, dressed the explorer; kitting out models for extreme climates and expeditions.

James’ interpretation of how we’ll survive extreme weathers comes in the form of coats with (what I hope is faux) fur. One number had a peacoat body with fur sleeves, while another flipped this idea creating the look of a gilt worn over a blazer. This brought whoops and cheers from the crowd, which would continue throughout the show. Models had long hair tied in sprayed pony tails, continuing James’ love of texture.


James Small A/W 2012 by Lorna Leigh Harrington

Next came James’ staple tailoring with an athletic aesthetic we’re getting used to in menswear. Coats came with belts that tied around the waist or buttoned to one side, worn with skinny jeans. Baggy dungarees followed in luxe greys with straps that crossed at the back, worn over engineered shirts or plaid. We also saw tartan (TARTAN!) coats, styled similarly to the previous ones, and athletic pants with contrasting arch detail on the inside.

James’ collections always leave me wanting more – his 14 or so looks were exceptionally coherent but a few more variations wouldn’t go amiss. I mean this in the nicest possible way.

Oh, and here’s a picture of Kate from last season. She looked exactly the same anyway.


All photography by Matt Bramford

Categories ,A/W 2012, ,Belts, ,Blackberry, ,Dark Arctic, ,Dungarees, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Fur, ,ipad, ,iPhone, ,James Small, ,Kate Moss, ,Krister Selin, ,London Fashion Week, ,Lorna Leigh, ,Lorna Leigh Harrington, ,Matt Bramford, ,menswear, ,photography, ,Sportwear, ,Tartan, ,Texture, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout

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Amelia’s Magazine | Carolyn Massey presents The Gentleman’s Code

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The London based duo Tinsel Edwards and Twinkle Troughton will be staging an event all day tomorrow (Thursday 29th) around London as part of their ‘ It Was The Best Of Times, mind It Was The Worst Of Times’ tour. Keep your eye out for a parking ticket on your car – you never know, viagra some lucky chosen few will contain a free signed mini screen print! Be sure to check out their work:http://www.tinseledwards.org/ and http://www.twinkletroughton.co.uk/.

WOOLIES

You’ve known each other since you were 9 years old – how long have work together creatively?

Edwards: We’ve worked together on lots of different creative projects over the years, rx we ran a little fanzine when we were about 10! There’s also the band we used to be in until recently and the record label we have set up.  When we were at college our art work was completely collaborative, we work separately now but often join forces for specific projects and to put on exhibitions.

Troughton: Tinsel has kind of said it all there. I think we are very much on the same wavelength work-wise and have been since we were 9. So ideas bounce off each other quite easily and i think it works really well to help us move things forward.

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Have you had formal training? How has this shaped how you work?

Edwards: We both went to art college in London, at the time it was really good to get regular feedback from tutors and students and that will have shaped the way we work in lots of ways. However we graduated in 2001 so it seems a while a go now! Now the way we work is shaped more so by our everyday lives and observations of our surroundings.

Troughton: It was quite funny because we went to separate art colleges, I went to Kingston which Tinsel was rejected from and Tinsel went to Goldsmiths which I was rejected from yet we ended up collaborating anyway and holding identical degree shows in each college. We had to go to each others crits and tutorials sometimes and so our work had quite a cheeky nature to it as it was a bit of an ‘up yours’ really, I think we still like to be playful in what we create together.

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How would you each describe your work individually and collaboratively?

Edwards: My work is a wide ranging commentary on all sorts of observations that I make in everyday life, I am interested in challenging and protesting about different things to promote and inspiring positive change.  I love the idea of Do-It-Yourself, and continually promote the idea of personal responsibility in my work.  I see my work as politically active, not because it references particular political events or current affairs, but because through my observations, questions, statements and slogans, I aim to instigate positive action and change on both an individual and wider level.  
The themes in my work vary widely, it can be an honest personal narrative, it can reference the everyday, or highlight social and cultural issues.  I often use humour to deal with these themes.

Troughton: I make work which is heavily influenced by Britain both now and as it was 2-300 hundred years ago. Up until recently my work was predominantly describing British quirks, questioning what we as Brits were modern day slaves to and using humour as a main tool to depict my ideas. While these elements are still running through my work it’s now got more political in many ways, I’m also questioning a lot of our cultural habits which actually stem back from a long time ago. I guess I’m looking at how on the surface everything changes yet underneath many things don’t change at all. 

Collaboratively: Both of our work stems from observation, and although in very different ways, the work is a response to life in Britain today.  The content and theme of each artist’s work is very different, but it stems from similar observations and concern. The approach is also similar, in that we both paint in bold colours and often use humour.

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Where does your inspiration come from? Childhood/training/location?

Edwards: Inspiration comes from all sorts of things, life in London is a massive influence, music and art, people’s attitudes and social observation.  Style and technique wise I love text and all things typographic, I love Pop art, big expressionist style painterly work, vintage graphic design.

Troughton: Inspiration comes from the media, newspapers mainly. I look at both snippets in the papers and the stories that dominate. Currently I am finding so much inspiration from more historical reading, both fiction and non-fiction. I’ve been reading Dickens and factual books about the Victorians and am basing a lot of research on historical reading combined with the scouring of newspapers each day. I also am inspired just by basic observation of day to day life. As an avid people watcher there is plenty of inspiration on the streets of London alone! Visually, I don’t have a list of artists who inspire me, that can pop up at any moment when visiting exhibitions. Just a small example: I got masses of inspiration recently from the historical collections at National Portrait Gallery but was also very inspired by the HUGE Maggie Thatcher painting by Marcus Harvey (although I had already done my Maggie painting I do need to point out haha!) so I think I take artistic inspiration from all over the place.

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Who are the artists that you most admire?

Edwards:There are soooo many artists I like for lots of different reasons! But if I had to name a couple I would say that I love Bob and Roberta Smith, because he is honest, challenging, funny, political and very frank and open.  And I really like Tracey Emin, also because I really admire her honesty and fearlessness.  I’ve always found her work very compelling.

Troughton: I guess my answer above answers some of this. Artists I really like though… I also love Tracey Emins work for very similar reasons to Tinsel. I love Jeff Koons’ work, especially his paintings which I personally just thought were out of this world, it’s always good to see work which leaves you feeling like you’ve got so much to aspire to! It makes you want to change and move things on and think bigger.

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How important is it to have a presence on the internet these days? Do you use Twitter and other social networking sites?

Edwards: I’m a bit reluctant to get sucked in to Twitter, and it took me a while to join Facebook!  But it is really important to have online presence, its a brilliant way to showcase your work and promote exhibitions, and to find out about other artists too.

Troughton: Urgh I am not too good at things like Twitter…I’m not sure people would want to follow my daily thoughts and actions like that. I don’t mind using those things as a platform to show artwork and to let people know about events, and I also don’t mind them for keeping in touch with friends old and new…but that’s about it…

What would your dream commission be?

Edwards: Erm!!! It would be really funny to be asked to do something for the Queen, or perhaps a bonkers old millionaire rock star, or a politician…. I would love to work on album covers for bands.  On a more serious note it would be absolutely amazing to be commissioned to do something like the fourth plinth, a big public commission which could be used as a platform to voice something really important and relevant to people’s lives.

Troughton: Dream commission?? Haha, yeah something for the Queen would be excellent. At the moment I think I would love to be commissioned to make a very large scale painting for a pubic space which was going to be used as a future insight to modern British life and our social issues. Something which freezes time to show future generations what life in Britain was like in the 2000s-2010s, showing both good and bad elements. 

How did you come up with the idea for your event this Thursday?

Edwards: The screenprint in the parking ticket bags is an image of a Woolworths empty shop-front, across the posters in the windows is written ‘It was the Best of Times It was the Worst of Times’.  The work is talking about how although recession can be very difficult it can also be a time for positive change and growth.  We thought that producing a mini print as a very large edition would help to promote that message.  Disguising each one as a parking ticket tied in quite well, when people find them although they might be initially a bit disappointed, what’s inside is actually a nice thing – some free art!
Our previous gallerist Stella Dore actually helped us to come up with a very initial version of the idea about two years ago. Because of the nature of our work, it is often confined to the gallery space, we wanted to do something which would take our work out of the gallery and to a wider audience.

Troughton: The Traffic Warden part of the idea did come from Steph at Stella Dore. We just didn’t know what to do with it back then. Then along the way little flashes of inspiration came to us, such as from reading Dickens. ‘It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’ is an opening line to one of his novels’ and both me and Tinsel felt that opening line was incredibly descriptive of modern life and was also a direct response to our own feelings about the recession. 

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Men designing womenswear is something that appears to dominate the fashion industry. We don’t know why, viagra 100mg but men are often able to create clothing for the opposite sex that oozes sex appeal and sassy beauty. Probably, hospital it’s down to the distance of being able to appreciate something that they are not, alongside the aesthete’s almost iconic hero-worship of the female form. Women designing menswear however, is not a similar occurrence, Menswear extraordinaire Carolyn Massey however is shaking up the status quo. With her creations gallivanting across Parisian runways and her third capsule collection hitting Topman stores, this lady knows a thing or two about how a man should dress; and it should be through wearing her pieces.

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Graduating from Royal College of Art four years ago, Massey is known for her attention to detail, tailoring and her menswear is branded as gentlemanly. The clothes are durable and investment-worthy, just like something your granddad would wear. During a recent talk entitled “The Gentleman’s Code”, as part of a fashion lecture series at The Museum of London, Massey discussed her interpretation and inspiration of the gentleman in the past and present.

Trawling through the archives of garment history, Massey accumulated an intense knowledge of how men used to dress from the turn of the century to the war and inter-war period. Bringing historical details back to contemporary design is no easy feat. Despite finding beautiful detailing on buttons and stitches, much of Massey’s research led her to conclude that things like personal designer touches (including errors) were maxims perhaps best left to the Victorians. Details such as hand-sewn embellishments would not be bothered with today on a grand scale. After all, our economy runs on a manufacturing basis, and there is unfortunately little swing for hand-stitching and “one-of-a-kind” designer details, despite the exquisiteness of entirely hand-sewn trousers.

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(Photography by Matt Bramford)

Instead of lock-stock reverting to historical design principles, Massey subtly attempts to alter impressions of menswear. Traditionally seen as distinctly “un-fashion”, there is an ongoing debate into whether menswear as a branch of the fashion industry even exists. As Massey persuasively argued, menswear changes less rapidly and more subtly than womenswear, and that this can be used to good cause. Menswear should therefore be durable and long-living. Men should buy a tailor blazer or suit or trousers, and keep them forever. What should be thrown out is our culture’s attitude of “throw-away-ability”, our IKEA spawn of buying something cheap because then we can replace it. Don’t get Massey started on Primark.

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Despite being influenced by dandy dressers of the past, who wore impeccably detailed and tailored pieces, Massey insists that the notion of the gentleman comes from within; stating during the talk that it’s an attitude and a style of life, not a 3 piece suit from Armani. Massey cannot create these items as a magic cure-all to transform the average gent into Oscar Wilde. Massey holds a great fascination for silhouettes and shapes; the pieces play within being eccentric but lightweight, vivacious but muted, sharp but comfy. Coding is important, and that’s why the military is highly prevalent in her work.

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Investigating old regulation army jackets and badging rules, Massey incorporated these touches into her own work. In the same way, functionality is a big deal for the boys; if they need a pocket – they want a pocket. Dappling in the ubiquitously difficult ‘man bag’ territory and Massey comes off strong, demonstrating functionality as key. What can’t this woman do?

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(photograph by Matt Bramford)

Carolyn Massey’s dip into the archives benefited menswear relevance greatly this season. Her SS10 collection was classic but contemporary, an increasingly hard balance to hit successfully. With the rise of metrosexuality and unisex brands, good old fashioned tough, eccentric, granddad clobber is hard to find. However, with designers like Massey taking the time to get into the mindset, clothing born from style’s past creates a functional contemporary gentlemen.

For more talks and events (FREE!) check out the Museum of London

Categories ,Bespoke designs, ,Carolyn Massey, ,London Fashion Week, ,menswear, ,military jackets, ,Victorians

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