Amelia’s Magazine | Wood Festival 2015 Review: A Family Friendly Musical Paradise

Wood Festival 2015-review year of the bee
This year, as ever, the weather was absolutely gorgeous for Wood Festival: plenty of sunshine and dry underfoot despite the downpours a few days previously. I managed to persuade my friend (and fellow mum) Helen of East End Prints to accompany us as I knew that Snarf would love to feral around with his lil’ mate (we went to the Buddhafield Green Earth Awakening Camp together last year, read my review here) and we arrived in time for a late lunch on Saturday, staying through to Sunday evening.

Wood Festival 2015-review kids run wild
Wood Festival 2015-review out door singing
Wood Festival 2015-review tyre swing
Wood Festival 2015-review snarf
Wood Festival 2015-review bubbles
Wood Festival 2015-review harmony workshop
Wood Festival 2015-review samba band
I know I’ve said this in previous years but Wood Festival is perfect for kids: there is a sense of freedom and safety in the field at Braziers Park that is rare to find, and we basically had a child-led festival, following where our little ones wanted to run. We ate cheesy chips, enjoyed unexpected tunes around the daytime campfire, roamed the woodland playground, ate ice cream, chased bubbles, joined a harmony singing workshop, followed the samba band (dressed as bumble bees), ate more ice cream and of course listened to some music when we could:


The Wallingford based Band of Hope shared some beautiful folk harmonies and soaring violin melodies. They have put together a podcast recorded at Wood Festival, which you can listen to here.

Wood Festival 2015-review main stage
Wood Festival 2015-review kids in woods
Wood Festival 2015-review bee girls
Wood Festival 2015 review kids workshop
Wood Festival 2015-review dining tent
Wood Festival 2015-review campfire
Wood Festival 2015-review the gang
Late on Saturday night I listened to Tunng from the comfort of our tent, having adjourned for the night at a ridiculously early hour with my child. This was the first time the band have played together in some time and they sounded great, even in my half asleep state.


Co-Pilgrim put together a typically dreamy set from the wonderful album A Fairer Sea, which lulled my over excited three year old to sleep. Expect a new album from them soon.


The ‘big bastard baritone’ vocals of Liverpool based John Joseph Brill (his words not mine) were an exciting discovery – a uniquely raspy voice married to soulful reverb that is a heavenly cross between Interpol, U2 (in the best sense) and I LIKE TRAINS. Go check him out.


I heard Spiro on the radio a few weeks ago and was most taken with their tight music making (the result of many years playing together), a deft combination of classical music, dance and folk. It was great to hear them live.

Wood Festival 2015-review band with baby
Finally, Francis Pugh & The Whisky Singers are bluegrass singers from Oxford and were a great reminder of what Wood Festival does so well: creating a family friendly atmosphere where everyone can enjoy great music in a relaxed setting. Where else would you so comfortably find a baby on stage, holding a red balloon?

We are already looking forward to next year.

All photography by Amelia Gregory, our portrait by Mim Saxl.

Categories ,2015, ,A Fairer Sea, ,Band of Hope, ,Brazier’s Park, ,Buddhafield Green Earth Awakening Camp, ,Child Friendly, ,children, ,Co-pilgrim, ,East End Prints, ,Family, ,Francis Pugh & The Whisky Singers, ,I Like Trains, ,Interpol, ,John Joseph Brill, ,Mim Saxl, ,Oxford, ,review, ,Snarf, ,Spiro, ,tunng, ,U2, ,Wood Festival, ,Year of the Bee

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Amelia’s Magazine | Alexander McQueen: Genius of a Generation Book Launch

mike inglis - the fall

Exploring the primitive need for belief systems in an increasingly confusing world, viagra and Culross based artist Mike Inglis presents Transmit: a series of stark, decease graphic and narrative based screen prints. Juxtaposing ancient and modern religious icons from voodoo rituals, cost catholic symbolism and contemporary graffiti, Transmit portrays and alternative moral code for a modern disconnected population.

Connecting all the pieces together is the omnipresent ‘spaceboy‘ character. A figurative symbol of disenfranchised youth, the ghost-like character appears introverted, presented in a variety of foetal, anti-social stances. Often depicted alone or with his equally disconnected female counterpart (based on the artist Kirsty Whiten) spaceboy hides inside his space helmet, shutting out the barrage of conflicting messages surrounding and consuming the world he inhabits.

“Spaceboy is very much a part of how I feel or have felt in my darker moments,” explains Inglis, “But he is also a cypher exploring how many people feel. Viewers really relate to the character and that can only be because they recognise or relate to him. Everything I make, all the characters, contain something of me but often it’s not a dominant emotion.”

But will the enigmatic Spaceboy ever reveal his true identity? “Spaceboy will never reveal his face, it’s not important how he looks, just how he feels and how we all relate to him. How he changes in relation to the spaces he inhabits and how he makes us think about our own relationships with places and people.”

In addition to his series of screen prints is Inglis’ intriguing Cigar Box Shrine, a mixed-media assemblage piece created out of found objects and pasted text. Pushing further the theme of contemporary graffiti icons as street culture replacements for their older religious counterparts, the box highlights societies fascination with religious artefacts and the interchangeable nature many of these faiths possess. The most curious items within the Shrine are the Pharmaceutical Bottles which Inglis had blessed by a bona-fide voodoo priest in Amsterdam.

“The voodoo priest was a total revelation!” Inglis reminisces, “Although from my research I knew the true profile of the religion was very complex and most of the portrayals of Voodoo priest (Santeria) were Hollywood horror movie hokum, I still had preconceived notions. The guy was a very camp white Dutchman, incredibly helpful and warm and instantly reversed all thoughts and fears I had. We had a very interesting morning together and he performed a ceremony preparing the powders for the shrines, all the time chatting away.”

The Axolotl Gallery will no doubt be feeling the positive effects of the blessed powders, which are said to bring about spiritual benefits, as Transmit is yet another successful addition to a list of unique and highly innovative installations in their New Town gallery. Transmit will run until the Saturday the 29th May.

mike inglis - the fall
All photography by Calum Ross.

Exploring the primitive need for belief systems in an increasingly confusing world, pills Culross based artist Mike Inglis presents Transmit: a series of stark, graphic and narrative based screen prints. Juxtaposing ancient and modern religious icons from voodoo rituals, catholic symbolism and contemporary graffiti, Transmit portrays and alternative moral code for a modern disconnected population.

Connecting all the pieces together is the omnipresent ‘spaceboy‘ character. A figurative symbol of disenfranchised youth, the ghost-like character appears introverted, presented in a variety of foetal, anti-social stances. Often depicted alone or with his equally disconnected female counterpart (based on the artist Kirsty Whiten) spaceboy hides inside his space helmet, shutting out the barrage of conflicting messages surrounding and consuming the world he inhabits.

mike inglis - triptych

“Spaceboy is very much a part of how I feel or have felt in my darker moments,” explains Inglis, “But he is also a cypher exploring how many people feel. Viewers really relate to the character and that can only be because they recognise or relate to him. Everything I make, all the characters, contain something of me but often it’s not a dominant emotion.”

mike inglis - cigar box shrine

But will the enigmatic Spaceboy ever reveal his true identity? “Spaceboy will never reveal his face, it’s not important how he looks, just how he feels and how we all relate to him. How he changes in relation to the spaces he inhabits and how he makes us think about our own relationships with places and people.”

In addition to his series of screen prints is Inglis’ intriguing Cigar Box Shrine, a mixed-media assemblage piece created out of found objects and pasted text. Pushing further the theme of contemporary graffiti icons as street culture replacements for their older religious counterparts, the box highlights societies fascination with religious artefacts and the interchangeable nature many of these faiths possess. The most curious items within the Shrine are the Pharmaceutical Bottles which Inglis had blessed by a bona-fide voodoo priest in Amsterdam.

mike inglis - pharmaceutical bottle

“The voodoo priest was a total revelation!” Inglis reminisces, “Although from my research I knew the true profile of the religion was very complex and most of the portrayals of Voodoo priest (Santeria) were Hollywood horror movie hokum, I still had preconceived notions. The guy was a very camp white Dutchman, incredibly helpful and warm and instantly reversed all thoughts and fears I had. We had a very interesting morning together and he performed a ceremony preparing the powders for the shrines, all the time chatting away.”

The Axolotl Gallery will no doubt be feeling the positive effects of the blessed powders, which are said to bring about spiritual benefits, as Transmit is yet another successful addition to a list of unique and highly innovative installations in their New Town gallery. Transmit will run until the Saturday the 29th May.

peggysue by kellie black
Illustration of Peggy Sue by Kellie Black.

I arrive by bike as usual to meet the three members of Peggy Sue at Spitalfields Market. Rosa got lost on hers and didn’t make their 6Music interview earlier in the day, recipe which handily alerted me to the fact that it is Katy’s 24th birthday today, patient as well as the official launch of their new album Fossils and Other Phantoms. I wonder if their plan to go bowling in Brick Lane has come off, information pills but it turns out the bowling alley was closed and they had to make do with chucking oranges at Lucozade bottles in the Old Truman Brewery instead. After their launch gig at Rough Trade East the band plan to head over to the Scala to enjoy the scuzzy sounds of Mount Eerie.

Even though Peggy Sue have been around for a few years they were only signed to Wichita at the end of 2009. Despite this, Katy, Rosa and Olly began recording their album over a three week period in New York last year. Producer Alex Newport – who has worked with the likes of Does it Offend You, Yeah? – first discovered the girls a couple of years ago at SXSW and he was joined by John Askew, better known as a producer of trance music, but who has also worked with The Dodos. They worked on the album in the studio at night and it was really intense. “But we wanted to do as much as possible,” says Rosa, “plus we like to work really hard.”

peggysue by kellie black
Illustration of Rosa by Kellie Black.

Many of the songs were written in New York, but they came back to the UK to overdub the tracks with friends. Peggy Sue seem quite amused that some of their session musicians belong to bands much more famous than theirs, with a horn section provided by members of Arcade Fire and TV on the Radio.

With the album finished a little over a year ago I wonder if they aren’t perhaps a bit frustrated with the long wait for it to come out officially?
Katy: For a little while we were, but then you just realise that you have to work around other people’s schedules. We’ve only been playing a few new songs on tour so we’re not sick of them yet. We haven’t run out of emotion!
Rosa: We purposefully held back some songs till the album came out.
Olly: And we’ve written some new songs since the album was made.
How pushy is your record company?
Katy: No one tells us what to do.
That I can well believe….

Quite a few reviewers seem to have identified a strong theme of heartbreak running through the album. How would you respond to this?
Katy: Some songs are about breaking other people’s hearts
Rosa: …or endings in general. They can be morose when taken as a whole body of work, but not when taken individually.
Katy: Some people are just ignoring the other themes. We take it in turns to do lead vocals so it’s not like they’re all about just one break up. I don’t know if I want to be known as horribly bruised by love…
Rosa: I don’t remember the last time I had my heart broken!

peggysue by kellie black
Illustration of Olly by Kellie Black.

They used to be Peggy Sue and the Pirates. What happened to the Pirates?
Katy: When Rosa and I started the band we were both studying at Sussex and it was just for fun. I was doing American Studies and Film. I’m still supposed to go to the US for a year as part of my course, but I keep deferring…
Olly: I was studying Popular Music at Goldsmiths, but I didn’t finish either. I prefer to actually make music.
Rosa: I was studying English Literature, but I’m the only one who finished my degree. We started getting serious two years ago when Olly joined. It made sense to drop the Pirates bit when we stopped being a duo and our music became less folky.

How did you girls hook up in the first place?
Katy: I was offered a gig as a solo artist and I asked Rosa to help out.
Rosa: I was so nervous I vomited into my mouth when I went on stage.
Katy: It was really nice to do it together. It was how you should start a band – it didn’t work when I tried to find people I didn’t know; a band needs to be built on good relationships.

How did you guys find Olly?
Olly: I went to Brighton and saw Peggy Sue playing as part of Brighton Festival – I fell in love with them immediately and became a bit of a groupie. I met them again at SXSW, and saw them play in my hometown of Margate.
Rosa: You were one of our favourite fans; we used to give you CDs for free!
Katy: We made him come and watch The Dodos so he could see what we wanted with the drum section and he liked it.
Olly: To start with I didn’t think it was a good idea for the girls to get a drummer because I preferred them without… but then I kept sending lots of pestering emails…
Eventually he organised his own audition in one of the practice rooms at his college, at which point Katy and Rosa realised he could be a great asset. Does he mind being the only man in a band with such strong women?
Olly: Not really, I’m half a girl
Rosa: …and I’m half a boy.

peggysue by kellie black
Illustration of Katy by Kellie Black.

Olly learnt drums at secondary school, Rosa learnt piano and Katy learnt a bit of piano and some clarinet. But as a band they play whatever they can lay their hands on, with great aplomb. How do they pick up all these different instruments so easily?
Katy: There’s something about teaching yourself that means you only play what you can but you play it really well. It’s nice to be self taught as it means there are no rules.
Rosa: I understand enough about how to put music together but I can’t read music very well. It means you discover new things.
Katy: I understand music in quite a mathematical way but I find it hard to translate that into playing a guitar. They are two separate things in my head
Which are your favourite instruments?
Katy: I like my electric guitar.
Rosa: For me it always goes back to the guitar. But when I try a new instrument I end up writing new melodies as I learn how to play it, which means that every song turns out differently.
Olly: I never imagined I would play the guitar but I ended up strumming a few notes on some of the songs, and now I’ve built a bucket base too…
Rosa: …it sounded in tune until we started recording…

I loved the video for single Watchman. How did you get that made?
Katy: We asked illustrator Betsy Dadd to make the video when she was going out with my best mate.
I like the humping angels. What guidance did you give?
Katy: I said she could tap into whatever themes she wanted. We don’t often make videos.
Rosa: In a perfect world we’d have one for every song
Some of the imagery would be great for putting onto merchandise.
Katy: I’d like to put some of the stills onto a t-shirt. We’ve got only one design going at the moment. It features a wolf dancing with a skeleton.

At the time of interviewing the band Katy had just been offered a place at Berkeley in California, but fear not she won’t be going unless she can put her heart and soul into it. Which means we’ve lucked out instead. For now you can catch that great big heart and soul at a whole pile of festivals this summer. Including Dot to Dot and the Park Stage at Glastonbury on Saturday morning.

You can read my review of Fossils and Other Phantoms here.


Illustration by Leinz

The above scene probably wasn’t too far off how things looked during those first few days after the election, order as talks between Nick Clegg and David Cameron opened and a five-day negotiation period ensued. This image is just one of the many political slogans designed by an array of artists, which were projected onto a number of London landmarks during the election campaign.

Billbored’ – launched by POLLOCKS – is an art collective, spearheaded by artist and curator Josef Valentino, who described the project as a viral art initiative aiming to empower people: “The political parties aren’t inspiring us, so we will have to inspire ourselves.”

Featuring initial designs from several artists including M.I.A, Pete Fowler, The Futureheads, Anthony Burrill and Robert Montgomery, this creative venture aimed to encourage and empower general members of the public to develop their own ‘Billbored’ campaigns, showing their personal vision for change.


Illustration by M.I.A.; photography by Cakehead Loves Evil

The submitted visuals were then projected onto the front of key London buildings and structures, including the Tate Modern and Canary Wharf during and after the election period by a team of guerrilla projectionists, gathering support and encouraging further online activity. They were also made available via social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter.

As David Cameron warms up the bed at No 10 and the campaign draws to a close, we take a look at some of the most eye-catching projections during the election period, providing us with an alternative take on UK politics…


Illustrated by Leinz


Visual by The Futureheads


Visual by Sarah Maple


Visual by Riot Art


Illustration by Neville Brody


Visual by Konrad Wyrebek


Illustration by Pete Fowler; photography by Cakehead Loves Evil


Illustration by Josef Valentino; photography by Cakehead Loves Evil


Visual by Hayden Kays; photography by Cakehead Loves Evil


Illustration by Dave Anderson; photography by Cakehead Loves Evil

British fashion is normally typified by its quirky features, salve but Samantha Cole of Samantha Cole London is a stand out star in her own rights. Having presented her collection Identity III: A New Dawn at the London Fashion Week On|Off Presents… show and winning Best Womenswear Designer at New York Fashion Week for Spring Summer 2009, visit this site she is truly a force to be reckoned with. In an interview with her, I got to know the inner workings of her creative mind, and pick her brains (er…not literally) about her unique style.

Your Autumn/Winter 2010 collection, Identity III: A New Dawn, made heavy use of your smocking technique, giving the fabrics a beautiful texture. Do you think that this is a key element in the feeling of “coming out, coming through, a fresh start and something new” that you had?

The feeling of coming out and coming through was more from a cleansing point of view and starting over with a clean slate which, in its purest state, was emphasised through the use of white. It was a re-birth into something new that felt almost alien-like and surreal in approach, which can be seen from the styling images of the collection to further enhance this point. ?It is my love of structure, detail, texture and architecture that produced the smocking techniques inspired by the pyramids of Egypt used to create the textured feel to the collection.

Besides your smocking technique, there is an elegance and grace in your clothing, which is arguably difficult to find when using your unique and exaggerated silhouettes. How would you define the style your line exemplifies?

Thank you for that, it’s the first time my work and the words “elegance and grace” have been used in the same sentence. ?My style stems from a definitive point of view, very rarely subtle or subdued. It can be aggressive to further emphasis a point and for the most, be part fearless in its approach. This can be seen in more detail through the styling of my work, it goes beyond the garments to produce a complete overall look of my inspiration which, for the most part, is a combination of both fantasy and reality.

Your previous two collections Identity: A Journey of Self Discovery and Identity II: Warrior, as well as A New Dawn, both feature quite voluminous and textured aspects, especially in the tailored yet feminine qualities. Would you agree in saying that these techniques create an haute-couture element to your designs?

To some degree yes it does, I love detail and textures which does give that couture feel but still like to keep the silhouettes simple at the same time.
Your collections tend to only draw very little influence from modern trends. Every designer in the industry is unique, but do you feel that your collections, such as A New Dawn, allow you stand out like many designers before you, such as the late Alexander McQueen?
I don’t know that I stand out as such, but there are a plethora of creative minds doing similar things who are also unique in their approach. I just do what I want to do regardless of what’s going on around me. ?In regards to my influences, it’s really what I’m drawn to at that time. Though having said that, there is so much to pull from the past, which I find more interesting as a designer to do.

You worked on the design team at Burberry before your venture into your own label, leaving that uniquely British imprint on your designs. Do you feel that your designs exemplify what British fashion is all about?

British fashion for me has always been about creativity, individuality, eccentricity, rebellion and the freedom to explore your skills and talent to the fullest. It’s the complete and total abandonment that you can only get here in the UK, which is why I love this country so much and why it’s such a perfect fit for me. So in answer to your question, yes, I do believe that my designs exemplify what british fashion is all about.

Arguably, there is a lack of popularity among British brands in the market, with the exception of the likes of Burberry, and that consumers aren’t really aware of other labels. Do you feel that, as an award-winning British label, there is a need to promote the rebellious and eccentric natures? Do you feel that Samantha Cole London could be a potential front-runner in promoting these British natures?

I don’t look to what the industry wants, expects or requires. It’s not intentional to rebel or to be seen as different, and I’m personally so overwhelmed with the outpouring of so much commerciality, that I’m sometimes bored to tears. I’m not here to raise the flag or be a front runner but just to be me and express my thoughts and ideas through what I do. It’s why I got into the industry in the first place – I have something to say, it may be considered rebellious, but it’s just an opinion. Something I don’t go out of my way or ethos to express, and definitely wouldn’t, is consider myself a poster child or otherwise to what you call “British natures”….I’m just me, doing me.

With the head scratching, questions out of the way, I took it upon myself to ask Miss Cole a few quick fire questions:

Do you prefer sketching designs or actually constructing them?

Constructing them for me is the fun part, the first garment mostly sets the path for the rest of the collection and i never end up with what I sketched anyway, so it is sometimes a waste of my time

What do you like the most about designing your clothes?

Experimenting with textures and details

How would you define your personal style in three words?

Dark, understated, confused

What does fashion mean to you in three words?

Creativity, rebellion, individuality

What advice would you give to anyone who would like to follow in your footsteps and do fashion design?

I think if it is their dream and passion they should go for it. It will be stressful, tiring, exhausting, most days feel like an emotional rollercoaster and it can be disheartening but as long as they stay true to the dream and the passion they started with and are in it for the right reasons, then I say great!!…The fashion industry is an amazing place to be, and design is the hub of creativity.

You can see more of Samantha Cole’s collections on her website, and read our review of the On|Off Presents… show here.

Illustration by Katie Harnett

After attending the Susie Bubble talk at Sketchbook’s pop up shop, treat I headed to Kristin Knox’s book signing, sickness who coincidently is the magazine’s resident fashion editor. Held just a hop, hospital skip and jump away in the Material bookstore, the special event took place off Carnaby Street amid celebrations, music and elephants for the 50th anniversary of a street synonymous with style and cutting edge fashion.
 
Like everybody, I was shocked and saddened by the news of Alexander McQueen’s sudden death in February this year. Overwhelmingly successful, his collections reflected a passion for digital print combined with the natural world, with a heavy emphasis on colourful, unique patterning. His iconic designs and silhouettes have paraded down the catwalk for the last 15 years, with his spring/summer 2010 collection lauded by countless commentators as his best to date.
 
When Kristin Knox was approached by the publishers to write the biography she decided to write a tribute instead. ‘I wanted to focus on the fashion,’ she told me. Flattered to be asked to produce such a wonderful and poignant publication, the time-scale was tight. ‘I had to finish the book in around a month!’ Knox mentioned casually. Quite the challenge for anyone, but when I flicked through the carefully selected photos, chosen from a vast archive, she has quite clearly risen to the occasion and done the designer proud.


Illustration by Katie Harnett
 
The book is packed with over a hundred stunning images of McQueen creations, from his 1993 degree show (stylist Isabella blow bought the entire collection) to his posthumous show in Paris this year. With comments from journalists, stylists and influential figures and friends, it provides a visually stunning account of his designs and ideas.
 
With a demanding schedule revolving around sourcing photos and researching cultural fashion history for her new book, alongside updating her own website, Knox manages to make time for other interests. An Oxford classics graduate, she still dips into Latin texts in her spare time. ‘At university, I read fashion magazines as a hobby [and latin texts for study] and now it’s the other way around!’
 
Kristin, naturally wearing McQueen leggings, was very welcoming and happily posed for my slightly blurry photos- my iPhone came to the rescue after camera refused to spark into life. When I asked her why she decided to hold it at Material, it was the result of Butters (her cute Pomeranian) and the bookstores resident dog hitting it off! The event gave plenty of opportunity to browse the bookshop’s vast range of art, design and fashion literature.
 
Along with assistant fashion dog Butters, Kristin is responsible for The Clothes Whisperer website and is currently working on a new fashion book covering 50 different countries, due out in August. In the meantime, you can buy this lasting tribute here.  

Read our tribute, by ex McQueen intern Jonno Ovans, here; read Georgia Takacs’ examination of McQueen’s legacy here.

Categories ,Alexander McQueen, ,Book Signing, ,Carnaby Street, ,Genius of a Generation, ,Kingly Court, ,Latin, ,Leggings, ,Material, ,Oxford, ,paris, ,sketchbook, ,Style Bubble, ,The Clothes Whisperer

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Amelia’s Magazine | Alexander McQueen: Genius of a Generation Book Launch


Illustration by Katie Harnett

After attending the Susie Bubble talk at Sketchbook’s pop up shop, I headed to Kristin Knox’s book signing, who coincidently is the magazine’s resident fashion editor. Held just a hop, skip and jump away in the Material bookstore, the special event took place off Carnaby Street amid celebrations, music and elephants for the 50th anniversary of a street synonymous with style and cutting edge fashion.
 
Like everybody, I was shocked and saddened by the news of Alexander McQueen’s sudden death in February this year. Overwhelmingly successful, his collections reflected a passion for digital print combined with the natural world, with a heavy emphasis on colourful, unique patterning. His iconic designs and silhouettes have paraded down the catwalk for the last 15 years, with his spring/summer 2010 collection lauded by countless commentators as his best to date.
 
When Kristin Knox was approached by the publishers to write the biography she decided to write a tribute instead. ‘I wanted to focus on the fashion,’ she told me. Flattered to be asked to produce such a wonderful and poignant publication, the time-scale was tight. ‘I had to finish the book in around a month!’ Knox mentioned casually. Quite the challenge for anyone, but when I flicked through the carefully selected photos, chosen from a vast archive, she has quite clearly risen to the occasion and done the designer proud.


Illustration by Katie Harnett
 
The book is packed with over a hundred stunning images of McQueen creations, from his 1993 degree show (stylist Isabella blow bought the entire collection) to his posthumous show in Paris this year. With comments from journalists, stylists and influential figures and friends, it provides a visually stunning account of his designs and ideas.
 
With a demanding schedule revolving around sourcing photos and researching cultural fashion history for her new book, alongside updating her own website, Knox manages to make time for other interests. An Oxford classics graduate, she still dips into Latin texts in her spare time. ‘At university, I read fashion magazines as a hobby [and latin texts for study] and now it’s the other way around!’
 
Kristin, naturally wearing McQueen leggings, was very welcoming and happily posed for my slightly blurry photos- my iPhone came to the rescue after camera refused to spark into life. When I asked her why she decided to hold it at Material, it was the result of Butters (her cute Pomeranian) and the bookstores resident dog hitting it off! The event gave plenty of opportunity to browse the bookshop’s vast range of art, design and fashion literature.
 
Along with assistant fashion dog Butters, Kristin is responsible for The Clothes Whisperer website and is currently working on a new fashion book covering 50 different countries, due out in August. In the meantime, you can buy this lasting tribute here.  

Read our tribute, by ex McQueen intern Jonno Ovans, here; read Georgia Takacs’ examination of McQueen’s legacy here.



Categories ,Alexander McQueen, ,Book Signing, ,Carnaby Street, ,Genius of a Generation, ,Kingly Court, ,Latin, ,Leggings, ,Material, ,Oxford, ,paris, ,sketchbook, ,Style Bubble, ,The Clothes Whisperer

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Amelia’s Magazine | The ACOFI Book Tour: visiting The Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011

On Tuesday I hit the second date of my ACOFI Book Tour, buy this time at the rather wonderful Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh. I chat with super friendly bookshop guru Matthew via the wonders of twitter, symptoms so it was a delight to meet him in the flesh.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011 Narcissus Garden Yayoi Kusama
Narcissus Garden by Yayoi Kusama.

After settling in for a nice piece of fruit tart and a glance at a selection of the newest titles in the incredibly well stocked bookshop I had a brief chance to wander around the current exhibition Narcissus Reflected, information pills which features a painting by Salvador Dali on loan from the Tate and for the very first time shown as it was meant to be, with the poem that accompanies it. Upstairs a mass of light silver balls floods the airy space – Narcissus Garden is an update of a piece by Yayoi Kusama first shown back in the 1960s. A small darkened room strewn with comfy floor cushions has been cordoned off to showcase a beautifully soporific film by Pipilotti Rist.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011 biscuitsACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011-iced gemsACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011 biscuits

The Fruitmarket Gallery cafe was sadly closed for our evening event so I went a bit crazy in the local supermarket: plates of colourful Jammy Dodgers, Iced Party Rings, Jaffa Cakes, Iced Gems and Pink Wafers were soon adorning the cafe tables. Yup! It was a veritable E number fest. If it’s not going to be beautifully homemade why not head off to the other end of the spectrum I say?! These biscuits remind me of many a childhood party…

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011 Dr.Hauschka
At the front I arranged a tray of yummy Dr.Hauschka goodies for guests to take away and try later.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011 Juiceology
Matthew’s expert merchandising skills came to the forefront as he arranged a (fashionable) colour block display of Juiceology juices and appealing piles of ACOFI and AAOI atop a round table next to which I sat to give my talk.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011
ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011
ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011
Abi Lewis of We Are Caravan.

I had been a bit nervous about travelling all the way to Edinburgh because it’s so far away from my normal stomping ground and I don’t really know many people up there… but I needn’t have worried because the cafe packed out very quickly with about 50 people, who gathered in friendly groups, chatting and taking the opportunity to sample the colourful Juiceology offerings before I settled down to do my talk, a very good write up of which you can read on the We Are Caravan blog.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011
ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011
ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011
ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011
v
Lesley Barnes and her friend Libby.

Luckily my only Scottish-based ACOFI illustrator Lesley Barnes was also in able to make it along to The Fruitmarket Gallery – she brought along some wonderful work to share with us, and talked a little bit about the process of working with me so it was really wonderful to have her there, especially now we’ve been working together for nearly two years since she answered the brief for my first book. I only realised this week that this was in fact pretty much the start of her involvement with briefed illustration, although she was doing lots of her own work beforehand.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011-Lesley Barnes

I do like to remind people that hers is an exceptional talent – Lesley Barnes has never been formally trained, instead choosing to do a degree in English Literature, and yet she has managed to develop an utterly unique and identifiable style that is finally garnering some acclaim: she featured in a recent issue of the Sunday Times Style magazine and her work is stocked in the Soma Gallery, to which I will be trundling along on Thursday 26th May.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011

After the talk there was more time to speak to everyone and I managed to take snaps of just a few of the delightful creative people that I met: some of whom I persuaded to pose against the excellent neon sculpture in The Fruitmarket Gallery cafe area.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011-We Are Caravan
Ian, Julz and Abi run We Are Caravan, with whom I’ve been chatting on twitter in the run up to my Edinburgh visit. You can also find Abi Lewis, who was dressed in the most wonderful patterned vintage dress, at Hateful Snippets. We Are Caravan run a mobile gallery that travels around in yes, you guessed it, a caravan.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011-Kirsty Jay Anderson and Emily Hall
Kirsty Jay Anderson and Emily Hall had come along to get inspired. Kirsty studied textiles and now runs A Wooden Tree which sells gorgeous upcycled vintage textiles and ephemera, whilst Emily has recently decided that she is going to turn her hand to illustration after doing many other things for years, including stone carving in castles, which sounds fantastic! I look forward to seeing what she produces.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011-Mabel Forsyth and Siobhan Murchie
Mabel Forsyth, aka Pink Pig came along with her work colleague Siobhan Murchie of Shiv Illustration – who just happens to be the cousin of Amelia’s Magazine contributor Sam Parr. What a small and wondrous world.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011 Roger la Borde
The Fruitmarket Gallery stocks my new range of Roger la Borde cards alongside my books (above), and so it was great to meet Lucy, who distributes my card designs all over Scotland. What a lovely lady she is! Here with her friend Sara.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011-Lucy and Sara

A very enjoyable part of the evening was giving a few portfolio crits. Yay! I hope I get to do more of these at the next few places I am visiting.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011-Casey Otremba
Casey Otremba.

First up I met American lass Casey Otremba, who was formerly a packaging designer in New York before becoming inspired to come to Edinburgh to study illustration a few years ago. The reason? Someone showed her a copy of issue 4 of Amelia’s Magazine. Double yay!

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011-Casey Otremba
Her fashion illustration portfolio features some really wonderful fine line pencil work with some stylish injections of pure vibrant colour. I particularly loved the meticulous fluidity of the poses she draws and I hope she’s going to start contributing to Amelia’s Magazine soon so you’ll get to see more of her work…

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011 Culloden Robertson and Elizabeth Hudson
Culloden Robertson and Elizabeth Hudson.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011-doodle by Lizzie Hudson
A doodle by Lizzie Hudson.

Elizabeth Hudson had travelled all the way from Glasgow, where she studies fine art, along with her friend Culloden Robertson of Iko Art. It was wonderful to see how a trained fine artist adapts to illustration briefs and I was particularly enamoured of the sweeping fantasies of her impulsive narrative work which make imaginative use of colour, line and text.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011 Culloden Robertson and Elizabeth Hudson, Amelia
Myself with Culloden Robertson and Elizabeth Hudson. I’m not sure why I thought it was a good idea to stick my finger in my ear. It was late.

As a special thankyou to everyone who turned up for this event we are extending the special offer that was available on the night at The Fruitmarket Gallery. Just quote Amelia’s Blog offer when you go in, and you’ll be able to purchase both Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration and Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration for £40 together, or for £22 apiece. The offer is valid for one more week, so if you didn’t decide to purchase on the night you can still take advantage of some very reasonable prices indeed. Thankyou Fruitmarket Gallery!

Next week I will be embarking on a triple whammy: Brighton on Tuesday 24th May at Castor & Pollux, where we’ll be fed by cupcakes from the Angel Food Bakery, then on to Comma Shop on Wednesday 25th May, where there will be the chance to sample a specially blended new flavour of ice cream from G & D’s Cafe: raspberry with white and dark chocolate chips. Nom nom nom. Plus rosette button making lessons from Anna Butler at Custom Made UK. Really, what’s not to like?!

Then on Thursday 26th May I’ll be turning up at the Soma Gallery in Bristol: where Hart’s Bakery will be providing home made iced biscuits, custard creams and gingerbread hearts, whilst local girl and Lahloo Tea founder Kate Gover will be on hand to answer all your tea-related questions.

Finally, I will be back at Tatty Devine on Tuesday 7th June the week after, where I will round up the ACOFI Book Tour with a little help from Biscuiteers. Looking forward to seeing as many of you as possible en route! Don’t forget to join the facebook events by clicking on the various shop links above.

Categories ,A Wooden Tree, ,AAOI, ,Abi Lewis, ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Angel Food Bakery, ,Anna Butler, ,Biscuiteers, ,Biscuits, ,brighton, ,bristol, ,Casey Otremba, ,Castor and Pollux, ,Comma Shop, ,Culloden Robertson, ,cupcakes, ,Custom Made UK, ,Dr.Hauschka, ,edinburgh, ,Elizabeth Hudson, ,Emily Hall, ,G & D’s Cafe, ,Hart’s Bakery, ,Hateful Snippets, ,Ice Cream, ,Iced Gems, ,Iced Party Rings, ,Iko Art, ,Jaffa Cakes, ,Jammy Dodgers, ,Juiceology, ,Kate Gover, ,Kirsty Jay Anderson, ,Lahloo Tea, ,Lesley Barnes, ,Mabel Forsyth, ,Narcissus Garden, ,Narcissus Reflected, ,Oxford, ,Pink Pig Illustration, ,Pink Wafers, ,Pipilotti Rist, ,Roger La Borde, ,Salvador Dali, ,Sam Parr, ,scotland, ,Shiv Illustration, ,Siobhan Murchie, ,Soma Gallery, ,Sunday Times Style, ,Tatty Devine, ,The Fruitmarket Gallery, ,Yayoi Kusama

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Amelia’s Magazine | The ACOFI Book Tour: visiting The Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011

On Tuesday I hit the second date of my ACOFI Book Tour, this time at the rather wonderful Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh. I chat with super friendly bookshop guru Matthew via the wonders of twitter, so it was a delight to meet him in the flesh.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011 Narcissus Garden Yayoi Kusama
Narcissus Garden by Yayoi Kusama.

After settling in for a nice piece of fruit tart and a glance at a selection of the newest titles in the incredibly well stocked bookshop I had a brief chance to wander around the current exhibition Narcissus Reflected, which features a painting by Salvador Dali on loan from the Tate and for the very first time shown as it was meant to be, with the poem that accompanies it. Upstairs a mass of light silver balls floods the airy space – Narcissus Garden is an update of a piece by Yayoi Kusama first shown back in the 1960s. A small darkened room strewn with comfy floor cushions has been cordoned off to showcase a beautifully soporific film by Pipilotti Rist.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011 biscuitsACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011-iced gemsACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011 biscuits

The Fruitmarket Gallery cafe was sadly closed for our evening event so I went a bit crazy in the local supermarket: plates of colourful Jammy Dodgers, Iced Party Rings, Jaffa Cakes, Iced Gems and Pink Wafers were soon adorning the cafe tables. Yup! It was a veritable E number fest. If it’s not going to be beautifully homemade why not head off to the other end of the spectrum I say?! These biscuits remind me of many a childhood party…

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011 Dr.Hauschka
At the front I arranged a tray of yummy Dr.Hauschka goodies for guests to take away and try later.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011 Juiceology
Matthew’s expert merchandising skills came to the forefront as he arranged a (fashionable) colour block display of Juiceology juices and appealing piles of ACOFI and AAOI atop a round table next to which I sat to give my talk.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011
ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011
ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011
Abi Lewis of We Are Caravan.

I had been a bit nervous about travelling all the way to Edinburgh because it’s so far away from my normal stomping ground and I don’t really know many people up there… but I needn’t have worried because the cafe packed out very quickly with about 50 people, who gathered in friendly groups, chatting and taking the opportunity to sample the colourful Juiceology offerings before I settled down to do my talk, a very good write up of which you can read on the We Are Caravan blog.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011
ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011
ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011
ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011
v
Lesley Barnes and her friend Libby.

Luckily my only Scottish-based ACOFI illustrator Lesley Barnes was also in able to make it along to The Fruitmarket Gallery – she brought along some wonderful work to share with us, and talked a little bit about the process of working with me so it was really wonderful to have her there, especially now we’ve been working together for nearly two years since she answered the brief for my first book. I only realised this week that this was in fact pretty much the start of her involvement with briefed illustration, although she was doing lots of her own work beforehand.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011-Lesley Barnes

I do like to remind people that hers is an exceptional talent – Lesley Barnes has never been formally trained, instead choosing to do a degree in English Literature, and yet she has managed to develop an utterly unique and identifiable style that is finally garnering some acclaim: she featured in a recent issue of the Sunday Times Style magazine and her work is stocked in the Soma Gallery, to which I will be trundling along on Thursday 26th May.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011

After the talk there was more time to speak to everyone and I managed to take snaps of just a few of the delightful creative people that I met: some of whom I persuaded to pose against the excellent neon sculpture in The Fruitmarket Gallery cafe area.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011-We Are Caravan
Ian, Julz and Abi run We Are Caravan, with whom I’ve been chatting on twitter in the run up to my Edinburgh visit. You can also find Abi Lewis, who was dressed in the most wonderful patterned vintage dress, at Hateful Snippets. We Are Caravan run a mobile gallery that travels around in yes, you guessed it, a caravan.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011-Kirsty Jay Anderson and Emily Hall
Kirsty Jay Anderson and Emily Hall had come along to get inspired. Kirsty studied textiles and now runs A Wooden Tree which sells gorgeous upcycled vintage textiles and ephemera, whilst Emily has recently decided that she is going to turn her hand to illustration after doing many other things for years, including stone carving in castles, which sounds fantastic! I look forward to seeing what she produces.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011-Mabel Forsyth and Siobhan Murchie
Mabel Forsyth, aka Pink Pig came along with her work colleague Siobhan Murchie of Shiv Illustration – who just happens to be the cousin of Amelia’s Magazine contributor Sam Parr. What a small and wondrous world.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011 Roger la Borde
The Fruitmarket Gallery stocks my new range of Roger la Borde cards alongside my books (above), and so it was great to meet Lucy, who distributes my card designs all over Scotland. What a lovely lady she is! Here with her friend Sara.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011-Lucy and Sara

A very enjoyable part of the evening was giving a few portfolio crits. Yay! I hope I get to do more of these at the next few places I am visiting.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011-Casey Otremba
Casey Otremba.

First up I met American lass Casey Otremba, who was formerly a packaging designer in New York before becoming inspired to come to Edinburgh to study illustration a few years ago. The reason? Someone showed her a copy of issue 4 of Amelia’s Magazine. Double yay!

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011-Casey Otremba
Her fashion illustration portfolio features some really wonderful fine line pencil work with some stylish injections of pure vibrant colour. I particularly loved the meticulous fluidity of the poses she draws and I hope she’s going to start contributing to Amelia’s Magazine soon so you’ll get to see more of her work…

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011 Culloden Robertson and Elizabeth Hudson
Culloden Robertson and Elizabeth Hudson.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011-doodle by Lizzie Hudson
A doodle by Lizzie Hudson.

Elizabeth Hudson had travelled all the way from Glasgow, where she studies fine art, along with her friend Culloden Robertson of Iko Art. It was wonderful to see how a trained fine artist adapts to illustration briefs and I was particularly enamoured of the sweeping fantasies of her impulsive narrative work which make imaginative use of colour, line and text.

ACOFI Book Tour Fruitmarket Edinburgh 2011 Culloden Robertson and Elizabeth Hudson, Amelia
Myself with Culloden Robertson and Elizabeth Hudson. I’m not sure why I thought it was a good idea to stick my finger in my ear. It was late.

As a special thankyou to everyone who turned up for this event we are extending the special offer that was available on the night at The Fruitmarket Gallery. Just quote Amelia’s Blog offer when you go in, and you’ll be able to purchase both Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration and Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration for £40 together, or for £22 apiece. The offer is valid for one more week, so if you didn’t decide to purchase on the night you can still take advantage of some very reasonable prices indeed. Thankyou Fruitmarket Gallery!

Next week I will be embarking on a triple whammy: Brighton on Tuesday 24th May at Castor & Pollux, where we’ll be fed by cupcakes from the Angel Food Bakery, then on to Comma Shop on Wednesday 25th May, where there will be the chance to sample a specially blended new flavour of ice cream from G & D’s Cafe: raspberry with white and dark chocolate chips. Nom nom nom. Plus rosette button making lessons from Anna Butler at Custom Made UK. Really, what’s not to like?!

Then on Thursday 26th May I’ll be turning up at the Soma Gallery in Bristol: where Hart’s Bakery will be providing home made iced biscuits, custard creams and gingerbread hearts, whilst local girl and Lahloo Tea founder Kate Gover will be on hand to answer all your tea-related questions.

Finally, I will be back at Tatty Devine on Tuesday 7th June the week after, where I will round up the ACOFI Book Tour with a little help from Biscuiteers. Looking forward to seeing as many of you as possible en route! Don’t forget to join the facebook events by clicking on the various shop links above.

Categories ,A Wooden Tree, ,AAOI, ,Abi Lewis, ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Angel Food Bakery, ,Anna Butler, ,Biscuiteers, ,Biscuits, ,brighton, ,bristol, ,Casey Otremba, ,Castor and Pollux, ,Comma Shop, ,Culloden Robertson, ,cupcakes, ,Custom Made UK, ,Dr.Hauschka, ,edinburgh, ,Elizabeth Hudson, ,Emily Hall, ,G & D’s Cafe, ,Hart’s Bakery, ,Hateful Snippets, ,Ice Cream, ,Iced Gems, ,Iced Party Rings, ,Iko Art, ,Jaffa Cakes, ,Jammy Dodgers, ,Juiceology, ,Kate Gover, ,Kirsty Jay Anderson, ,Lahloo Tea, ,Lesley Barnes, ,Mabel Forsyth, ,Narcissus Garden, ,Narcissus Reflected, ,Oxford, ,Pink Pig Illustration, ,Pink Wafers, ,Pipilotti Rist, ,Roger La Borde, ,Salvador Dali, ,Sam Parr, ,scotland, ,Shiv Illustration, ,Siobhan Murchie, ,Soma Gallery, ,Sunday Times Style, ,Tatty Devine, ,The Fruitmarket Gallery, ,Yayoi Kusama

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Amelia’s Magazine | The ACOFI Book Tour visits Castor and Pollux in Brighton

ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011 -000

Art and design shop Castor and Pollux is situated in three airy arches on Brighton seafront, ampoule a location that was formerly public loos and then a yoga studio.

ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011
The view outside the shop. How gorgeous is this?

The arches now house a beautifully curated collection of well designed goodies: there’s a kids’ section, for sale a book section, a gallery space and lots of cards, note books, homewares and hand made jewellery. It’s all highly desirable, so I’m super happy that my Roger La Borde cards now have a home in Castor and Pollux alongside Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration. You really must visit the shop if you are in Brighton!

ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011
ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011
ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011

Unfortunately I arrived last night for my ACOFI Book Tour with very little time to spare. (Thankyou traffic, in the four years since my beloved Cinquecento departed for the great car graveyard in the sky London streets have started to resemble the chaos of cities like Delhi, what with all the large trucks a-honkin’ and a-hootin’ at each other). Luckily April was on hand to help me shift piles of books down onto the seafront – aided by Suki and Alice Pattullo, who studied illustration at Brighton.

ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011 postcards
ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011 ALICE Pattullo and April
Alice Pattullo and April of Castor and Pollux.

ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011 Suki, Alice with a guest
Suki and Alice with a guest.

I should have known that if I went to Brighton I was bound to bump into some people who studied on the same course as me at University of Brighton (Ba Hons Fashion Textiles with Business Studies since you ask). Turns out the fabulous illustrator Sarah Arnett, who I first discovered at Pick Me Up (and who has since started contributing to Amelia’s Magazine) was in fact a few years ahead of me.

ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011 Sarah Arnett
Lovely Sarah Arnett.

Sarah has taken an interesting route to illustration – she specialised in weave at college (we had a choice of print, knit or weave) and then went into the textiles swatch trade, before setting up a small studio making clothes that ended up becoming a shop. She only discovered the joy of illustration when a friend bartered some Illustrator lessons in exchange for a dress. Now, not only does she produce gorgeous illustrations, but she has also recently launched the most BEAUTIFUL collection of clothes featuring her inimitable flower designs. The label is called Modern Love and you can find it in Liberty.

ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011 Lou Taylor, Jo Vintage Brighton, Kate Jenkins, April
Lou Taylor, Jo of Vintage Brighton, Kate Jenkins and April.

When Kate Jenkins turned up I recognised her instantly, and not because we have run multiple blogs featuring her unique knitted artworks. She looked familiar because she too was the year above me at Brighton. How wonderful to discover that Brighton fashion textiles graduates are doing such diverse and interesting things that have fed into the world of Amelia’s Magazine.

ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011 Juiceology
ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011 Angel Food Bakery
ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011 Angel Food Bakery.

Before my talk started guests had a chance to once again try out the lovely Juiceology juices, which I have decided are a bit like a juice equivalent of Refreshers sweeties – they have such a wonderful tang to them, quite unlike any other juice I’ve tasted. April had also managed to source some outstanding cupcakes from the Angel Food Bakery – who, quite without my knowledge, had baked the most beautiful buttery creations featuring a transfer design of the Amelia’s Magazine logo.

ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011 Lahloo tea

This time round I also had a moment to drink a few cups of Lahloo Tea, and can confirm that both the Peppermint and Darjeeling were absolutely delicious, served very prettily in tea cosy covered china teapots. There were also of course samples of Dr.Hauschka aplenty to take away, much appreciated by those in attendance.

There were plenty of other interesting people at Castor and Pollux, and here’s a selection of those that I managed to talk to:

ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011 Paul from Chichester
Paul had come all the way from Chichester on behalf of his girlfriend… and he’d sneaked out a copy of her issue 2 for me to sign for her birthday (hope she’s not reading this) which I thought was incredibly sweet. Fortunately he didn’t seem at all daunted by the heavy female quotient: sadly one boy ran away before my talk began. Boys, please come and meet me, my talk is just as much for you! I’d also really like to encourage as many people as possible to come and talk to me at the remaining talks… I want to hear what you are up to so that I can give your creative projects as much exposure as possible.

ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011 Sarah Meredith and Matilda
ACOFI book tour rock cakes pumpkin ring
Sarah Meredith of Rock Cakes could only stay for a little while because her little girl Matilda needed to get home for bed, but she too had brought along some back copies for me to sign. She was sporting some fantastic rings from her dainty jewellery collection – I particularly love the enamelled pumpkin and the cute birds which sit together as if talking. You can find more of her designs on the Rock Cakes website and on Etsy.

ACOFI book tour angel food bakery cupcakes
ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011 Angel Food Bakery
Me chomping on a cupcake from the Angel Food Bakery.

Also present was Lou Taylor, who has also recently started contributing to Amelia’s Magazine. She has been using paper art to create the most amazing props for many years, but illustration is a new thing. I think her paper cut techniques work marvellously well as illustration – see her CocknBullKid illustration for example – and am glad she has found a place to showcase this new work.

ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011 Jessie Ford
I also met illustrator Jessie Ford, whose website you can check out here.

ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011 Racheal Brooks, Racheal Stott, Verity Brown, Judith Wilding
Racheal Brooks, Racheal Stott, Verity Brown, Judith Wilding

Judith Wilding of Delicious Industries is a graphic designer, who keeps a great blog about old school design.

ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011 Verity Brown
Verity Brown shows me her portfolio.

A few recent graduates of my course turned up just as I was finishing my talk and one had been savvy enough to bring her portfolio of lovely fashion illustrations to show me. They missed most of the part where I talk about how you absolutely have to be online and engaged with social media to promote yourself as an up and coming creative, but I hope they will listen to my advice as, unbelievably, none of them had any web presence at all! I wish my old course would ask me back to teach the students a bit more about self promotion and marketing for creatives…

ACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011 Verity BrownACOFI book tour Castor Pollux Art 2011 Verity Brown
Illustrations by Verity Brown.

Jo of Vintage Brighton has very speedily blogged about my talk last night, so you can find out more about it by hopping over here. Thankyou Jo!

As I upload this blog I am sitting in the Pegasus Theatre cafe in Oxford and in a few minutes I have to get along to the next date on my #ACOFI Book Tour. Tonight I will be talking at Comma Shop at about 7.30pm tonight: please do join me from 6pm to network, eat Good Biscuits, taste a new G&D ice-cream flavour and learn how to make button rosettes with Custon Made UK. Then tomorrow I will be rolling on up to Bristol to speak at the Soma Gallery. It’s all very exciting because I love meeting so many different creative communities, so do come and join me at one of these venues soon and tell me what you’re up to. I am back at Tatty Devine in Brick Lane on Tuesday 7th June. Over and out.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Alice Pattullo, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Angel Food Bakery, ,brighton, ,Castor and Pollux, ,Cinquecento, ,CocknBullKid, ,Comma Shop, ,cupcakes, ,Custon Made UK, ,Delicious Industries, ,Dr.Hauschka, ,G&D Cafe, ,G&D ice-cream, ,Good Biscuits, ,Ice Cream, ,Jessie Ford, ,Judith Wilding, ,Juiceology, ,Kate Jenkins, ,Lahloo Tea, ,liberty, ,Lou Taylor, ,Modern Love, ,Oxford, ,Pegasus Theatre, ,Racheal Brooks, ,Racheal Stott, ,Rock Cakes, ,Roger La Borde, ,Sarah Arnett, ,Sarah Meredith, ,Soma Gallery, ,Tatty Devine, ,University of Brighton, ,Verity Brown, ,Vintage Brighton

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Amelia’s Magazine | Robin Ince’s School for Gifted Children May Ball – Module One: A Review

pavement
robin ince -  jenny robins
Illustration of Robin Ince by Jenny Robins.

It was only thanks to Professor Brian Cox on twitter that I discovered Robin Ince’s School for Gifted Children May Ball – Module One. Not intended for children “this event will contain some swearing” and most definitely not featuring any dancing, diagnosis Robin Ince‘s quirkily named nights feature a mix of comedy alongside lectures from eminent and *cute* scientists. How on earth would this work? Well, seek the championing of rational scientific research was the binding factor of all the participants in the May Ball, be they comedian or scientist. Throw in some crowd participatory music and we did indeed have ourselves a ball.

Robin acts as compere of these evenings, and on Friday night he apologised for his frazzled persona, the result of election night lack of sleep and a preoccupation with the results, which was to become a theme of the evening. Despite incipient madness he was very funny indeed, whether jealous of his toddler son, who can happily eat crisps whilst sitting on the potty and watching television (he cannot), or reading an excerpt from a letter sent by Richard Hawkins following a debate over whether aliens are responsible life on earth.

The first act, Martin White, gave himself the hugely tough job of proving that any tune will become catchy if you repeat it over and over again. Or not, as the case may be. Through audience participation we arrived at a title, Napalm Death, for a tuneful little ditty consisting of some awkward minor chords and daft lyrics. All in ten minutes. It was an ambitious but entertaining way to start the evening, and he had the audience in the palm of his hand as we sang heartily through the finished piece.

Next up Susan Vale wandered on with a tatty plastic bag. “You’ve got no idea who I am have you? But you think I might be Susan Boyle, right?” Unfortunately for her, she had a point. “Normally I just do gags about quantum physics and end with a joke about nobs, but I can’t because Brian is here tonight,” she told us, before instead talking us through her musical obsession with The Fall via a wobbling stack of CDs on a stool. I wasn’t the only person for whom it occurred that this was a very male thing to do – when Robin reappeared he commented on her possible autistism. I was in slightly uncomfortable stitches the whole way through, especially when she wobbled her belly fat at the men in the audience. “See, I was feeling self conscious about it, but now I feel empowered.”

Lou the illustrator squirrel Reesdale
Gurning aristo by Lou the Illustrator.

Andrew Collins bounced on stage to a huge projection of a gurning aristocratic holding aloft a dead squirrel by it’s tail. Apparently the Red Squirrel Protection Partnership is hell bent on wiping out the grey squirrel by any means necessary, and Andrew likened this to racism against immigrants. Funnily enough these commandos are still less keen on a deadly hybrid of the grey squirrel – the even more virile black squirrel. The irony is that the upper classes were the ones who introduced the greys into Britain – as pets – in the first place.

BallyImmigrants_GarethAHopkins
“Bally Immigrants” by Gareth Hopkins.

Squirrel Marta Alvim
Illustration by Marta Alvim.

NB: I’m joking, clearly there are no deadly gun-toting squirrels in the UK.

However, the main theme of Andrew’s lecture was birds, and more specifically the things he would like to do with them; the first being to get a robin to feed from his hand, the second to be kissed, softly on the cheek, by a duck, and the third to walk down the street as if in a relationship with a pigeon.

Jonah Fazel
Illustration by Jonah Fazel.

andrew collins sandra diekmann
Andrew with pigeon girlfriend. Illustration by Sandra Diekmann.

Disclaimer: whilst I envisaged the pigeon as Andrew’s girlfriend, he would like to make it very clear that it is merely a friend. “I never considered it might be a girl.”

brian cox sandra dieckmann
Illustration by Sandra Diekmann.

All dark floppy hair and passionate enthusiasm, Brian Cox entered stage left looking not a day over 25, just as he does on the telly. He opened his lecture with a few scary looking graphs demonstrating how little cash is currently allocated for scientific research compared to the amount used to bailout the banks, and showing that expenditure in the UK is well below the average spend of the developing world.

Brian Cox Helen Harrop
Illustration by Helen Harrop.

A dedicated Liberal, Brian Cox is clearly worried about further cuts under a Tory government. Few celebrities are happy to state their political allegiances in public, and I really respect that Brian is, as his presence on television during election night made clear. He then bust out a map showing global temperature rises “for any of you idiots out there who still don’t believe in climate change”. He never really mentioned climate change in the Wonders of the Solar System, so I could’ve hugged him for this: it’s just a shame he was preaching to an audience of the already converted. He quoted Carl Sagan, who described the earth as an incredibly fragile and special “pale blue dot” and showed a series of spectacular slides to back this up, including one showing the Milky Way pulsing in a semi circle like an archway above the mountains in Chile.

profbriancox-farzeen
Illustration by Farzeen Jabbar.

We then went on a whistle stop tour of the birth of the universe which descended into some equations that Brian swore were simple (maybe for the scientists amongst us… of which I am sure there were many in the geeky audience.) Despite losing the point on occasion it left me gasping in awe (at the wonder of the universe, not Brian, I know what you’re thinking.)

briancox claire pinegar
Brian Cox by Claire Pinegar.

A break – loo situation in the Bloomsbury Theatre: bad, had to rush out during second half for wee due to extreme queues – was followed by a passionate lecture from Adam Rutherford, science writer at The Guardian and Nature magazine. Having read the Metro earlier in the day (I love the way that the Metro always has a simplified science page. You never got that in London Lite did you?) I was well up on the news that scientists have just discovered that most humans are in fact part Neanderthal – rather than pure bred Homo sapiens. We also learnt that Neanderthals were red haired… there’s no gingers in my family but I’ve always thought my dad has a very pronounced beetle brow.

Comedian Marcus Brigstocke took up the baton, likening our current political situation to our relations with the Neanderthals, where the Tories are likely to mate with the Lib-Dems, shag ‘em senseless and then eat them afterwards. (we were probably cannibals back in the day) An unmitigated Green, he spoke ecstatically of the news that Green Party leader Caroline Lucas has gained a seat in office.

marcus brigstocke - jenny robins
Illustration of Marcus Brigstocke by Jenny Robins.

Gavin Osborn was another funny musician, who performed a specially created ode to Brian Cox describing how his wife was suddenly nowhere to be seen on Sunday nights. Simon Singh has famously challenged the efficacy of the homeopathy industry – and has just won a libel case against the British Chiropractic Association. He whizzed through a series of photos from the case highlighting the presence of Dr. Evan Harris in each shot, before deferring to Ben Goldacre, a surprise appearance, who came on stage to explain just how much Dr. Harris has done for the cause of science and free speech. On May 6th he lost his Lib-Dem seat in Oxford to an evangelical Christian, helped into office by a relentless smear campaign. Sadness at this loss was mentioned throughout the evening and Ben made everyone stand for an ovation, whereupon it soon became obvious that Evan himself was seated in the audience.

EvanHarrisHayleyWarnham
Illustration by Hayley Warnham.

Robin had saved special surprise guest Australian comedian Tim Minchin for last. “I’ve just been cleared of a speeding fine in Pontypridd. True,” he told us as he grabbed the top off the piano and barefoot, bespectacled, took his seat. “I don’t need eyeliner when I wear glasses.” Not being an aficionado I didn’t know what he was talking about but a swift visit to his website confirms that Tim normally sports thick emo-esque makeup, but I much preferred him without.

minchinstrikes Lazarou
“Minchin Strikes” by Lazarou Monkey Terror.

We were treated to the first public performance beyond the rarefied confines of YouTube of the “Pope Song“, which pillories the Catholic penchant for small boys with copious usage of the word ‘motherfucker’. A fantastic musician with immaculate comic timing, I would really like to see him again.

YouTube Preview Image

I’m all for making science more accessible and using comedy is a brilliant example of how to do this: over the course of three hours I laughed solidly whilst also learning a load of incredibly geeky and interesting stuff. I vow to see more comedy of this kind in the future. Robin Ince, I salute you for bringing this vision into reality.

You can read excellent reviews by Lucy Peel here and Jo Sue Gee here.
Robin Ince’s next evening of fun takes place on Thurs 24th June. Sadly I’ll be missing out on this one because I’ll be at Glastonbury with Climate Camp.

Categories ,Adam Rutherford, ,aliens, ,Andrew Collins, ,Ben Goldacre, ,Bloomsbury Theatre, ,Brian Cox, ,Carl Sagan, ,Caroline Lucas, ,chile, ,Claire Pinegar, ,Dr. Evan Harris, ,emo, ,Farzeen Jabbar, ,Gareth Hopkins, ,Gavin Osborn, ,Green Party, ,Hayley Warnham, ,Helen Harrop, ,Homeothapy, ,Homo sapiens, ,Jenny Robins, ,Lazarou Monkey Terror, ,Lib Dem, ,Libel, ,Lou the Illustrator, ,Marcus Brigstocke, ,Marta Alvim, ,Martin White, ,Metro, ,Nature Magazine, ,Neanderthal, ,Oxford, ,piano, ,Pigeons, ,Pope Song, ,Professor Brian Cox, ,Richard Dawkins, ,Robin Ince, ,Sandra Diekmann, ,Simon Singh, ,Squirrels, ,Susan Vale, ,The Guardian, ,Tim Minchin, ,Tory

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Amelia’s Magazine | An interview with painter, Jethro Buck

Oxford

Edgar Degas’ statement; “Art is not what you see, mind medicine but what you make others see, viagra 100mg ” pre-empts the paintings of Jethro Buck. Whilst Buck and Degas’ individual work relates to painting’s ability to convey emotional expressions by their manifold, their similarity lies in an ability to push the audience’s understanding of what it is to see the world.

Jethro Buck’s most recent paintings explore the geometry and non-linear perspective employed within Indian and Persian Miniatures in the creation of multiple narratives on a single picture plane. Subsequently Buck asks the audience to reconsider Western Perspective’s reliance on a single point of vision (or a single point of view) to create a static narrative within the illusion of 3D space.

What drew you to painting, as a medium?

Paint is an amazingly versatile material that can be turned, pretty much, into anything you want. It is pure pigment mixed with a binding medium, but when you squeeze it onto a palette, you have a little colourful blob of potential. Sometimes I’m quite happy just to leave it at that!

The rock where the pigment comes from is like a caterpillar, the manipulation of paint in the studio is the chrysalis and the painting is the golden Butterfly. What was a blob is transformed! Whereas, the art historians and the critics of the world are interested in the butterfly, the painters are more interested in the miracle of the chrysalis.

Whilst painting I find myself thinking in the language of paint. When visiting a museum, you’re meant to step back and think about the painting and its subject and ideas. I am always getting told off in galleries for looking so closely at a painting that my nose scrapes the surface! The closer I am to the painting, the closer I am to the world of the studio and artist’s thoughts as they mixed, diluted, scraped and brushed.

Do you find yourself follow traditional rules when constructing a painting?

Inevitably, through painting a lot, established rules are learnt and knowledge is acquired and the more of these rules you discover. However, in order for me to think differently and follow a creative process beyond a known craft, I think rules need to be broken. It is however, a good practice to learn as many rules as you can, so you know which rules to break later.

It has occurred to me that I really do not know the many rules of Indian miniature painting; For example, the relation between symbolism and the meaning of colour. The upside is that I am free to do whatever I want. However, I would like to know what rules I am breaking, as I don’t know what I’m missing. Ideally, I would like to return to India and study as an apprentice.

What is it that interests you about the possibilities of the surreal?

When a painting becomes surreal I am no longer confined by the rules of physics and therefore there are more possibilities.

I think I became interested in experimenting with the surreal after returning from India. It can feel surreal being in a different culture. What’s real to you is surreal to someone else and vice versa.

Pink and Grey

Does the subject matter of your painting change depending on the scale of the canvas?

It does, slightly, I tend to paint really big or really small. I like art to be removed from the everyday and the medium –to me- represents the everyday. I like the extreme ends of spectrums. I like the sense of intimacy produced by a small painting, as the viewer has to engage in a one-on-one level with the piece. Which is not to say big paintings cannot be intimate, when a subject is large in scale; it feels as if, it is perceptively closer to you.

Which leads to the inevitable question: Who or what are you artistic inspirations?

Nature, Matisse, Marrakech, India, miniatures, rugs, textiles, old natural history prints and TED lectures. I am interested in the relative, cyclic and none dualistic nature of Indian mythology, there is no definite yes or no meaning to my paintings.

What do you think enables a single painting to tell 1000 words?

Henri Matisse once said:

“The only valuable thing in art is the one thing that cannot be explained, to explain away the mystery of a great painting would do irreplaceable harm, for whenever you explain or define something you substitute the explanation or the definition for the image of the thing.”

The Fall

With this in mind, how do you approach the process of titling your work? For instance with a work such as “Fall” What’s the story behind this title?

I paint and then I write the first thing that comes to my head. ‘Fall’ comes from a photo of a really happy scene – some boys in India were jumping and flipping into a river. As the river can’t be seen in my painting, the image of a falling figure can become a metaphor for taking a leap into the unknown. The fall can be a weightless, disorientating and scary experience or an amazing, life-filled, liberating one.

‘Bird carpet bird’ was inspired by various world textile patterns and colours. ‘Oxford’ was painted in November and the colours appear muted compared to the Indian ones, because it’s a response to the sandy colours of Oxford. ‘A Zebra, on the moon?’ is less about colour and more about a zebra on the moon.

A Zebra, on the Moon

Which leads me to ask… How did A Zebra on the Moon develop? What is the story behind the image?

Zebra on the moon was born out of a conversation with Lilly (4) and Daisy Palmer (7). One day I asked Lilly what I should draw, and she replied.., “a flower eating a lorry!”

Children often possess the divergent thinking skills considered a sign of genius in adults. As we grow up, we unlearn this way of thinking, but my conversations with Lilly and Daisy have engaged this part of my mind.

As an English painter you must find yourself negotiating incredible rapid weather changes, do the differing quality of light impact upon your work?

The quality of light definitely affects my paintings. Whilst getting off a train in India, the boy sitting next to me asked, “what is your favourite thing about India?” In a hurry I said, “the people and the light“. The quality of light changes everywhere you go, in India, the sky would turn an amazing shade of red in the dusty light.

Generally, as an English painter it’s great to go to sunny countries with lots of light. The more light there is, the more vibrant colours become. I don’t think there is anywhere more colourful than India. Leaving a grey wintery England and landing in India is like suddenly discovering you have a colour saturation dial – on what you thought was only a black and white TV. On my return, my work, has unquestionably become more saturated.

Creative Goose

What impact do you think the development of Western Perspective has had on narration within paintings?

With the invention of perspective came the ability to create illusionary 3D space on a flat plane. These days’ cameras create this illusion all the time on our behalf. Photography and perspective rely on a similar principle, for the illusion to work; you have to have a single point of vision. A camera has to be still, in one place and in one time, in order to capture what is in front of it. Essentially what you end up with is an image representing a singular frozen moment – for me, perspective stops time.

This development created a way of representing the world, which –as an example- was very unlike the Bayeux tapestry or a Persian miniature, where lots of temporal events are represented simultaneously in one piece of work. It is easier to fit a wider time range on a non-perspective piece of work.

Haiku

Have you found this secondary impact of perspective as a time ‘freezer’ constraining as a painter?

It’s not a constraining idea, because it doesn’t really come into mind during the process of painting. Painting at its best is an action that happens in the here and now. I find the less thought there is usually the better a painting goes.

Does your interest in the possibilities of representing ideas of universality through geometry, stem from your own interest in biology and nature?

In a way, yes, there are many organic forms and occurrences in nature that have a flowing sort of chaotic order. I love the cracked, sun-baked earth ripples, clouds, cracked paint, the braches of a tree and the similar shapes of veins in the leaves, nerve cells and lung alveoli when looked at under a microscope. The forms repeat themselves in seemingly disparate areas of nature but there appears to be a common blueprint networking its way through everything; acting as a record of the flow of energy. Geometric patterns found on carpets and tiles are similar to these occurrences; they just happened to be straighter and neater versions.

Bird Carpet Carpet Bird

Which in turn – it could be said- relates to your long running interest in decoration and pattern?

I’ve always been drawn to pattern and if you walk around the Ashmolean or any museum, it will appear that most of humanity always has. Pattern seems to occur in cultures across all of time. It’s beautiful. Recently, my patterns have become more organised due to an increased interest in geometry. I’ve only scraped the surface of a vast discipline, but the first time I saw truly breath taking geometry was when I visited the Alhambre in Spain. As the Islamic world has studied geometry more deeply than any other culture, it makes sense –if one is interested in pattern- to study the magnificent geometric patterns of Islamic palaces and mosques.

The more I look at nature, the more geometry I see in it and the more I look at geometry, the more of nature I see in it. An obvious example of geometry in nature is the Romanesco cauliflower. I like to notice strikingly similar formations in widely different circumstances; such as the branches of trees, arteries, ripples and clouds.

Forever

An exhibition of Jethro Buck’s most recent paintings are currently on display at the North Wall Arts Centre, Oxford.
The gallery is open from 11am – 4pm Monday to Saturday and the exhibition runs from the 6th to the 18th December 2010.

Categories ,Alhambra, ,Degas, ,Falling, ,India, ,Jethro Buck, ,matisse, ,Oxford, ,painting, ,Persia, ,Port Meadow, ,spain, ,Summertown, ,Ted Lectures, ,The North Wall, ,Western Perspective

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Amelia’s Magazine | Announcing: The ACOFI Book Tour. Please join me as I visit some of the UK’s best design shops!

Press Days March 2011-ACOFI
ACOFI at the Forward PR press day in March.

WOO HOOO Grafik magazine have beaten me to an official announcement of dates for my ACOFI Book Tour. But here’s everything you need to know if you would like to join me somewhere in the UK.

The #ACOFI Book Tour
On Tuesday 10th May I will be embarking on a mini book tour across the UK to promote Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration. In case you haven’t visited my website before this is what you need to know about my new book, dosage which is otherwise known as #ACOFI (especially on twitter):

Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration: the Book.
Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration *featuring the very best in ethical fashion design* was published at the end of 2010, approved and is the second publication from Amelia’s House, order the book publishing wing of Amelia’s Magazine. It is a showcase for the work of thirty up and coming fashion illustrators who have interpreted the work of 45 exciting new ethical fashion designers, as well as plenty of good independent design that was first featured online at Amelia’s Magazine.

ACOFI cover facebook event Soma

What I’ll be doing:
I’ll be visiting various wonderful independent art and design shops around the country to talk about the rise of eco fashion, the illustration process and social media for creatives and I will also be offering portfolio crits. I’m hoping to meet lots of creative people en route, so if you think you might like to take part don’t forget to bring your portfolio along with you: personal crits will be free on purchase of both my books at a special tour discount. Not to worry if you can’t bring your portfolio along in the evening though! At some shops I’ll be doing a 24 Hour Crit, so you can come along and talk to me personally the next day if you prefer.

Press Days March 2011-ACOFI

ACOFI illustrators to join me en route, plus more:
I’ll be accompanied at various points by some of the fabulous illustrators featured in my blogs for Grafik this week, and alongside my informal chat there will be lots more creative excitement at each shop: at the Tatty Devine Covent Garden shop participants will be invited to help paint the shop windows and at Tatty Devine in Brick Lane there will be the opportunity to learn how to ice biscuits with Biscuiteers. Not only that but guests will be able to enjoy complimentary organic juices from top juice mixologists Juiceology, fine teas from Lahloo and there will be plates laden with traditional biscuits and cakes for you to munch on. Once again the fabulous folks at Dr. Hauschka will be providing yummy free samples for participants to take away.

Press Days March 2011-ACOFI

Here’s a full list of all the dates – all talks are free but space is limited in some shops so please book where necessary to ensure your place. I’ll be tweeting about my adventures on the #ACOFI hashtag and you can follow me on @ameliagregory. I have also linked to the six associated facebook events. Six of ‘em, oh yea baby. Please do join if you would like to be kept updated about a specific event. Bring on The ACOFI Book Tour.

Tatty Devine in Covent Garden, London: Tatty Devine in Covent Garden 24 Hour Crit and Window Painting on Tuesday 10th May 6-10pm, then continuing into Weds 11th May as part of the 24 Hour Crit.
Tatty Devine blog about the event.
Please book your place here admin@tattydevine.com
Facebook event and Twitter.
44 Monmouth Street, London, WC2H 9EP, 0207 836 2685

The Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh on Tuesday 17th May, 6.30-10pm, no booking necessary. 24 Hour Crit continuing into Wednesday 18th May.
Facebook event and Twitter.
Fruitmarket, 45 Market Street, Edinburgh, EH1 1DF, 0131 226 8181

Castor and Pollux in Brighton on Tuesday 24th May, 6-10pm.
To book your place email: april@castorandpollux.co.uk
Facebook event and Twitter.
165 King’s Road Arches, Lower Prom, Brighton BN1 1NB, 01273 773776

Comma in Oxford on Wednesday 25th May, 6-10pm.
To book your place email: hello@oxfordcomma.co.uk
Facebook event and Twitter.
247 Iffley Road, Oxford, OX4 1SJ, 01865 202400

Soma Gallery in Bristol on Thursday 26th May, 6-10pm, 24 Hour Crit continuing into Friday 27th May. To book your place email: fiona@somagallery.co.uk
Facebook event and Twitter.
4 Boyces Avenue, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 4AA, 0117 973 9838

Tatty Devine in Brick Lane, London: 24 Hour Crit and Biscuit Decorating with Biscuiteers on Tuesday 7th June, 6-10pm, continuing into Wednesday 8th June. Please book your place here admin@tattydevine.com
Facebook event and Twitter.
236 Brick Lane, London, E2 7EB, 0207 739 9191

Read more about my ACOFI launch party in January.
YouTube Preview Image

Reviews of Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration:

Champions the art form and gives a thorough insight into working practices… and it looks stunning, which is not a suprise considering the calibre of the work included. Design Week

Beautiful and informative as each interview and feature takes you on a personal journey, understanding where each artist and designer get their inspiration from and why ethical fashion is important to them. Ecouterre

A coffee-table book with a difference… perfect for dipping in and out of for both artistic and fashion inspiration. The Young Creatives

ACOFI has been featured in many publications including I-D online, Vogue, Digital Arts, Style Bubble, Cent Magazine and The Ecologist to name but a few. Why not click on the links and find out?

You can buy Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration online here. I hope to meet you soon!

Categories ,24 Hour Crit, ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Amelia’s House, ,art, ,Biscuiteers, ,Biscuits, ,Book shops, ,Book Tour, ,Brick Lane, ,brighton, ,bristol, ,cakes, ,Castor and Pollux, ,Cent Magazine, ,Comma, ,Covent Garden, ,design, ,Design Week, ,Digital Arts, ,Dr.Hauschka, ,Eco fashion, ,Ecouterre, ,edinburgh, ,Facebook, ,Forward PR, ,i-D, ,illustration, ,Juiceology, ,Lahloo, ,Lahloo Tea, ,london, ,Oxford, ,scotland, ,Social Media, ,Soma Gallery, ,Style Bubble, ,Talk, ,Tatty Devine, ,the ecologist, ,The Fruitmarket Gallery, ,The Young Creatives, ,twitter, ,vogue, ,Window Painting

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Amelia’s Magazine | Colourful Coffins become a Happy Journey

Colourful Coffins Lesley Barnes Thereza Rowe Abigail Daker
Colourful Coffins Lesley Barnes Thereza Rowe Abigail Daker
Colourful Coffins from Lesley Barnes, about it Thereza Rowe and Abigail Daker.

A couple of weeks ago, pharmacy while playing around on twitter, thumb I saw a link posted by Thereza Rowe for a site called www.colourfulcoffins.com. Intrigued (colourful and coffin not usually being words which go together) I took a look. The site featured eco-friendly coffins which had been customized using stock images and Thereza had discovered it when her husband – driving back from Oxford – had spotted a sign saying ‘colourful coffins’ and requested that she google it to see what it was all about.

Kate Slater colourful coffins
A Colourful Coffin by Kate Slater.

A conversation between Thereza, Lesley Barnes and myself then followed which turned into a far more serious discussion about how we would go about creating our own designs. With just a few tweets and a few more emails, the Happy Journey Collective was born. Other artists were invited to participate, given a ‘final destination’ box template to work around and their submissions have been added to the Happy Journey website which was set up by Thereza and features a banner design by Simon Wild. Excitingly, the website launched today!

Colourful Coffins uberkraaft
A Colourful Coffin by uberkraaft.

The great thing about the work submitted to the project so far is that all the contributing artists have created colourful and idiosyncratic pieces. Choosing an appropriate casket is a difficult task for anyone and the aim of the project is to provide a positive and eco-friendly alternative to the more traditional options.

For further information about the project, please contact us. This is an ongoing project and new work will be uploaded regularly; to view participating artists work, please check the website. Any artists wishing to get involved should visit the ‘Get involved’ page on the website, which contains details about the flickr group for open submissions to the project.

Categories ,Abigail Daker, ,Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration, ,Colourful Coffins, ,Eco-friendly, ,Flickr, ,Happy Journey Collective, ,Kate Slater, ,Lesley Barnes, ,Open brief, ,Oxford, ,Simon Wild, ,sustainable, ,Thereza Rowe, ,uberkraaft

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