Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011, Catwalk Review: Eudon Choi (by Helen)

Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, cheap buy more about illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, more about no, buy ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

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Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD. It was fantastic.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stoppers came out. One pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With bare feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence, although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this for me was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story. One that I would love to know.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress that came out reminded me of Queen Victoria herself mixed with Queen Elizabeth I, then adding Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. And wearing the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN. It was as black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, visit this illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, cheap no, order ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

content/uploads/2011/02/CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_116.jpg” alt=”CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_116″ title=”CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_116″ width=”480″ height=”320″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-34650″ />CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_091CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_081CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_040CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_037CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_030CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_008CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_126

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD. It was fantastic.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stoppers came out. One pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With bare feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence, although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this for me was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story. One that I would love to know.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress that came out reminded me of Queen Victoria herself mixed with Queen Elizabeth I, then adding Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. And wearing the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN. It was as black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, ask illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, ailment no, ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

content/uploads/2011/02/CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_040.jpg” alt=”CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_040″ title=”CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_040″ width=”480″ height=”320″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-34647″ />CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_037CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_030CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_008CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_126content/uploads/2011/02/CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_091.jpg” alt=”CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_091″ title=”CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_091″ width=”480″ height=”320″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-34649″ />CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_081Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stoppers came out. One pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With bare feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence, although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this for me was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story. One that I would love to know.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress that came out reminded me of Queen Victoria herself mixed with Queen Elizabeth I, then adding Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. And wearing the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN. It was as black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, order illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, no, ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic.

Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stoppers came out. One pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With bare feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence, although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this for me was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story. One that I would love to know.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress that came out reminded me of Queen Victoria herself mixed with Queen Elizabeth I, then adding Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. And wearing the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN. It was as black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, this illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, no, ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic. Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stoppers came out. One pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With bare feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence, although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this for me was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story. One that I would love to know.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress that came out reminded me of Queen Victoria herself mixed with Queen Elizabeth I, then adding Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. And wearing the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN. It was as black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, and illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, no, ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic. Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stopper dresses came out. One nearly pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With ballet satin encased feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence. Although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this for me was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story. One that I would love to know.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress that came out reminded me of Queen Victoria herself mixed with Queen Elizabeth I, then adding Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. And wearing the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN. It was as black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Dear Wuthering Heights, I quote thou: ‘Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you—haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!’

I hope you see what I mean.
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, healing illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, cheapest no, cialis 40mg ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic. Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stopper dresses came out. One nearly pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With ballet satin encased feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence. Although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this for me was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story. One that I would love to know.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress that came out reminded me of Queen Victoria herself mixed with Queen Elizabeth I, then adding Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. And wearing the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN. It was as black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Dear Wuthering Heights, I quote thou: ‘Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you—haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!’

I hope you see what I mean.
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, viagra 60mg illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, price no, search ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic. Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stopper dresses came out. One nearly pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With ballet satin encased feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence. Although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this for me was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story. One that I would love to know. Or – perhaps a, thrown out of her castle, princess.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress that came out reminded me of Queen Victoria herself mixed with Queen Elizabeth I, then adding Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. And wearing the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN. It was as black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Dear Wuthering Heights, I quote thou: ‘Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you—haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!’

I hope you see what I mean.
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, treatment illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, stuff no, viagra ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic. Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stopper dresses came out. One nearly pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With ballet satin encased feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence. Although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this for me was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story. One that I would love to know. Or – perhaps a, thrown out of her castle, princess.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress that came out reminded me of Queen Victoria herself, mixed with Queen Elizabeth I. Then adding Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. And wearing the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN. It was as black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Dear Wuthering Heights, I quote thou: ‘Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you—haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!’

I hope you see what I mean.
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, health illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, check no, cialis 40mg ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic. Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stopper dresses came out. One nearly pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With ballet satin encased feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence, a thrown out of her castle, princess. What did she do to be ejected? For me, although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress was BLACK. It reminded me of Queen Victoria herself, mixed with Queen Elizabeth I. Then with the addition of Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. Together with the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN, it was an explosion. Black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting, the material was reminiscent of a glassy ocean at night. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Dear Wuthering Heights, I quote thou: ‘Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you—haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!’

I hope you see what I mean.
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, pill illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, sickness no, ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic. Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stopper dresses came out. One nearly pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With ballet satin encased feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence, a thrown out of her castle, princess. What did she do to be ejected? For me, although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress was BLACK. It reminded me of Queen Victoria herself, mixed with Queen Elizabeth I. Then with the addition of Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. Together with the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN, it was an explosion. Black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting, the material was reminiscent of a glassy ocean at night. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Dear Wuthering Heights, I quote thou: ‘Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you—haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!’

I hope you see what I mean.
Eugon_Choi2_by_Karolina_Burdon
Eudon Choi LFW A/W 2011 Collection, click illustration by Karolina Burdon

I’m going to say saddles. And horses. It’s not just because there was a saddle on the invite to the show. You couldn’t escape the leather straps at Eudon Choi. I wasn’t entirely sure what they were all for, find but they were clearly beautifully soft and of the highest quality. One of the outfits a model wore, cheapest involved an all in one – I think, I’d have to study it at closer range – contraption, that worked like braces and a belt. The braces went down to the top of the thighs and featured gold loops and studs. Worn with a white shirt and beige skirt, it was very old English, equestrian. Open toe wedge boots were worn with short black dresses. Navy, orangey browns, tans, greys and rusty colours were prominent. Nothing too artificial, or over the top. You could imagine wearing these to work. The funnel neck coats, a line skirts, three quarter length sleeves and loose shouldered pieces, were all positively clean and sharp. I personally liked a long sleeved floaty dress, with a wide diagonal off white stripe across the body, from the neck to the hemline. It had a very high waisted leather belt, almost making it empire lined, and looked feminine and understated.

Eudon_Choi_BY_Avril_Kelly
Eudon Choi LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Avril Kelly

The skirts got shorter and then wider as the show continued. A wide grey/cream, short coat, made an appearance. It featured two strips of brown leather towards its hem, and was tailored to perfection. The floatier dressses hit midi length and full length, with slits to the thigh. These were looser, most strapless or with a single knotted strap, over the shoulder. The look was very together. Like the women who carry small tubes of expensive moisturiser and have ipad covers made from baby goat leather. And an actual ipad, or four.

Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1575
Andy Bumpus sketching in his ACOFI Moleskine notebook for Fashion Scout.

Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1574Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1637Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1597
Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1631Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1625Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1607Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1585Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1643
Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1640

Eudon Choi LFW A/W 2011 Collection, photography by Amelia Gregory

Everything felt very structured, slightly confined and purposeful. Asked how he would describe an Eudon Choi woman, the designer said: “She likes to stand out from the crowd yet look stylish and sophisticated. She looks individual, with an edge.” That’s perfectly achieved. Organised and controlled, a wearer of Chanel’s Red No.5 lipstick. She positively thrives over a bit of hard business with her espresso. Not a second to spare, she doesn’t even have time to look you up and down darling. Too busy looking ahead. Nice show.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,All Saints, ,Andy Bumpus, ,Avril Kelly, ,chanel, ,Chanel Red No. 5, ,Eudon Choi, ,Fashion Scout, ,Helen Martin, ,ipad, ,Karolina Burdon, ,leather, ,lfw, ,LFW A/W 2011, ,Mascluine, ,Moleskine, ,sleek, ,tailoring, ,Twenty8Twelve

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Amelia’s Magazine | Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration (ACOFI) Book Launch Party… by Matt


123 Bethnal Green Road, side effects illustrated by Naomi Law

The build up for the Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration launch party was immense. The #ACOFI hashtag on Twitter went mental in the run up, pilule with people planning their outfits and talking about meeting for the first time. The invites had all been sent, find Amelia’s kitchen was impossible to manoeuvre due to boxes piled high with goodies and 123 Bethnal Green Road‘s Scout Hut had been transformed.


Jenny Robins applies her make up surrounded by ACOFI goodie bags…

The day started as I rushed to Amelia’s with 8 potential outfits and a tote bag full of press releases. When I arrived, Amelia looking ever so slightly drained (having had about 4 minutes sleep in the previous week) and after responding to yet more emails asking for an invitation and picking nail varnish (for Amelia, not me) Ross from 123BGR arrived with his van. Contributor Sally turned up laden with her camera equipment, and we loaded everything into the van – box after box of Dr.Hauschka goodies, Moleskine notebooks, Tatty Devine necklaces, postcards, Amelia’s Magazine Issue 10, sh*tloads of ACOFI books and Amelia’s Nina Dolcetti shoes.

The atmosphere at 123 Bethnal Green Road was a a bit of a farce, as we unloaded the van, took everything downstairs and started to unpack it all. It was a bit intense, but I just couldn’t stop giggling. How were we going to make up 200 goodie bags each containing nearly 20 items? Well, with a little help from our friends at Forward PR, we managed it.


Lily Vanilli’s magnificent cake, illustrated by Jo Cheung


Holly from Make Lemonade, illustrated by Joana Faria

As the final Pukka tea sachet went into the last bag and Lily Vanilli arrived with her mindblowing ACOFI-inspired cake, the first few guests arrived including a very prompt Holly from Make Lemonade. I legged it to the top of the 123 building to get changed, and by the time I returned the tea party was in full swing. It was bloody packed, with illustrators creating images of guests and tea being served in gorgeous miss-matched vintage teacups and Felicity from Dr.Hauschka giving hand massages. Those who were lucky enough to enjoy her skillz came away from her table with the appearance of taking mild narcotics and I was desperate to get in there myself but just didn’t get the chance.


Rosie and Harriet of Tatty Devine, illustrated by Zarina Liew


Joana Faria sketches a guest


Amazing treats by Lily Vanilli

In between flirting with journalists and taking photographs I enjoyed a green spiced-chai Pukka tea with cinnamon and star anise and my fair share of Lily Vanilli’s delicious pearlescent scones. Thank God there wasn’t a bloody cupcake in sight. I hate cupcakes at these events; they’re impossible to eat and on more than one occasion I’ve ended up wearing more around my mouth than I’ve actually eaten: not a good luck when schmoozing peers.


Adorngirl, illustrated by Abby Wright


The gorgeous Gabby Young and Stephen, illustrated by Zarina Liew


Susie Bubble‘s covetable Dr. Martens


Amelia with stylist Rebekah Roy


Ellen Grace Jones from The Real Runway


Felicity from Dr. Hauschka gives a guest a relaxing massage


It’s Amelia’s parents!

Such a diverse range of guests came through the door, from high-end fashion glossies to Amelia’s parents (not that they’re not high-end, of course, but you know what I mean!)

The daytime bit was over in a flash, and it was a mad dash to throw all the vintage teacups into the sink before heading upstairs, where yet more guests arrived and the cavernous Scout Hut soon became packed wall-to-wall with illustrators, their guests, the fashion press and a host of other creative types.

Amelia’s amazing Nina Dolcetti shoes

The fabulous 6 Day Riot then blew the crowds away with their folky fun, before the Pipettes DJed to much dancing while I took photographs, met even more of the fabulous illustrators who have worked so hard over the last year to make Amelia’s Magazine what it is, and consumed my fair share of Vodka O and Adnams beers. My thanks goes to the Pipettes and later Will from the Mystery Jets (who played us out surrounded by honeys) for playing Single Ladies twice. My only explanation for my ludicrous shape-throwing is that I was so relieved to finally be on the dancefloor that I, y’know, sort of let go a bit. I also blame the sugar rush from Lily Vanilli’s incredible ACOFI-inspired cake.


Were these hired dancers…?!


Amelia with Nicola from Beautiful Soul


Amisha Ghadiali, illustrated by Antonia Parker

I could go on, but here are my top ten ACOFI moments (in no particular order)

1. When Amelia’s Joanna Cave earrings turned up at the 11th hour. Stunning!

2. When Amelia acquired tourettes and told me, as I descended the 123 stairs, that I looked ‘dreadful…erm, DREADFUL? I mean amazeballs!’ (Not verbatim, but you get the picture…)

3. When I told Gareth A Hopkins that somebody had come to the daytime do with a toilet seat on their head and he believed me.

4. When fashion photographer Liz Johnson-Artur took a picture of stylist Sabrina Bangladesh and the flash was so bright that her squeals could be heard in Walthamstow.

5. When I threw myself at the wall trying to be Beyoncé for Maggie Angus‘ benefit…

6. The great cover samples disappearance mystery, which later turned up in Amelia’s Nina Dolcetti shoebox. Well, this wasn’t exactly a favourite moment, but I wanted to mention it anyway…

7. Eating the cake.

8. Having my first taste of Vodka O and ginger ale, and then watching Nick from Forward PR (who was my only rival in the dance stakes) giving out ‘New York’ measures (no wonder I could barely stand up and everybody reported dreadful hangovers on Twitter the next day…)

9. When 6 Day Riot asked the crowd to join them on a chorus singing ‘Yadda yadda ya’ and lead singer Tamara said ‘I know we’re in East London, but come on!”


Sally Mumby-Croft filming

10. Suggesting that contributor Sally’s video edit would turn out like that scene in Love Actually where he films the wedding (more of a dream than a suggestion…)


Lovely guests… (from top) Illustrator Aniela Murphy and her boy, Jo Cheung and June Chanpoomidole, fashion designer Lira Leirner and Illustrator Faye West with the foxy red Chanel lips.

Finally, of course – so I guess number 11 – meeting all the wonderful illustrators and fashion types who I’ve got to know so well on Twitter and seeing them in the flesh! Glorious!

Can we do it again, please?

Read Amelia’s review of the launch party here, check out the in-store Eco Pop Up shop at 123 Bethnal Green Road (as part of the ACOFI fun) here, watch the illustrators talk all about the work on our YouTube channel AND buy the book here!

All photography by Matt Bramford

Categories ,123 Bethnal Green Road, ,6 Day Riot, ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Antonia Parker, ,beyonce, ,Dr.Hauschka, ,Jo Cheung, ,Joanna Cave, ,June Chanpoomidole, ,Lily Vanilli, ,Lira Leirner, ,Make Lemonade, ,Moleskine, ,Mystery Jets, ,Naomi Law, ,Nina Dolcetti, ,Pukka tea, ,Scout Hut, ,Tatty Devine, ,The Pipettes, ,Zarina Liew

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Amelia’s Magazine | Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration Launch Party Review: by Amelia

Nina Dolcetti by Natsuki Otani
Nina Dolcetti by Natsuki Otani.

Were you already considering how to make ethical shoes whilst you were studying at Cordwainers?
Absolutely. I come from a family of ethical fashion pioneers (Orsola de Castro of From Somewhere is my Mum), side effects store so it was a no-brainer for me. I know too much about the quantity of waste produced by the fashion industry and the exploitation of people and environment, link so of course I was set on running my label as ethically and morally as I could.

When did you first start to work with your signature wedge and what was the process of finding the perfect shape?
The first drawing I did of my signature curved wedge was in a quiet moment at my first Estethica exhibition at London Fashion Week in 2008, stuff when I was eight months pregnant. The wave of inspiration for my next collection had just hit me and I was absorbed in my new designs. It wasn’t until much later that I realised that the curve of the wedge was the exact line, only reversed, of the instep. And thinking about it now, I think the pregnancy definitely had something to do with it too!

Where do you source your materials from? 
I source my offcuts from anywhere and everywhere. I’ve found amazing textured leathers in markets in Spain, been given boxes of beautiful offcuts from other designers, and raided bins in factories. I can find a use for even the smallest scraps. The vegetable tanned leather comes from Italy, and the heels and platforms in cork and wood are hand turned in Norfolk…

Read the rest of this interview and see more illustrations of Nina Dolcetti’s shoes in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
Nina Dolcetti by Natsuki Otani
Nina Dolcetti by Natsuki Otani.

Were you already considering how to make ethical shoes whilst you were studying at Cordwainers?
Absolutely. I come from a family of ethical fashion pioneers (Orsola de Castro of From Somewhere is my Mum), abortion so it was a no-brainer for me. I know too much about the quantity of waste produced by the fashion industry and the exploitation of people and environment, so of course I was set on running my label as ethically and morally as I could.

When did you first start to work with your signature wedge and what was the process of finding the perfect shape?
The first drawing I did of my signature curved wedge was in a quiet moment at my first Estethica exhibition at London Fashion Week in 2008, when I was eight months pregnant. The wave of inspiration for my next collection had just hit me and I was absorbed in my new designs. It wasn’t until much later that I realised that the curve of the wedge was the exact line, only reversed, of the instep. And thinking about it now, I think the pregnancy definitely had something to do with it too!

Where do you source your materials from? 
I source my offcuts from anywhere and everywhere. I’ve found amazing textured leathers in markets in Spain, been given boxes of beautiful offcuts from other designers, and raided bins in factories. I can find a use for even the smallest scraps. The vegetable tanned leather comes from Italy, and the heels and platforms in cork and wood are hand turned in Norfolk…

Read the rest of this interview and see more illustrations of Nina Dolcetti’s shoes in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
Nina Dolcetti by Natsuki Otani
Nina Dolcetti by Natsuki Otani.

Were you already considering how to make ethical shoes whilst you were studying at Cordwainers?
Absolutely. I come from a family of ethical fashion pioneers (Orsola de Castro of From Somewhere is my Mum), price so it was a no-brainer for me. I know too much about the quantity of waste produced by the fashion industry and the exploitation of people and environment, ailment so of course I was set on running my label as ethically and morally as I could.

When did you first start to work with your signature wedge and what was the process of finding the perfect shape?
The first drawing I did of my signature curved wedge was in a quiet moment at my first Estethica exhibition at London Fashion Week in 2008, when I was eight months pregnant. The wave of inspiration for my next collection had just hit me and I was absorbed in my new designs. It wasn’t until much later that I realised that the curve of the wedge was the exact line, only reversed, of the instep. And thinking about it now, I think the pregnancy definitely had something to do with it too!

Where do you source your materials from? 
I source my offcuts from anywhere and everywhere. I’ve found amazing textured leathers in markets in Spain, been given boxes of beautiful offcuts from other designers, and raided bins in factories. I can find a use for even the smallest scraps. The vegetable tanned leather comes from Italy, and the heels and platforms in cork and wood are hand turned in Norfolk…

Read the rest of this interview and see more illustrations of Nina Dolcetti’s shoes in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
Nina Dolcetti by Natsuki Otani
Nina Dolcetti by Natsuki Otani.

Were you already considering how to make ethical shoes whilst you were studying at Cordwainers?
Absolutely. I come from a family of ethical fashion pioneers (Orsola de Castro of From Somewhere is my Mum), viagra approved so it was a no-brainer for me. I know too much about the quantity of waste produced by the fashion industry and the exploitation of people and environment, so of course I was set on running my label as ethically and morally as I could.

When did you first start to work with your signature wedge and what was the process of finding the perfect shape?
The first drawing I did of my signature curved wedge was in a quiet moment at my first Estethica exhibition at London Fashion Week in 2008, when I was eight months pregnant. The wave of inspiration for my next collection had just hit me and I was absorbed in my new designs. It wasn’t until much later that I realised that the curve of the wedge was the exact line, only reversed, of the instep. And thinking about it now, I think the pregnancy definitely had something to do with it too!

Where do you source your materials from? 
I source my offcuts from anywhere and everywhere. I’ve found amazing textured leathers in markets in Spain, been given boxes of beautiful offcuts from other designers, and raided bins in factories. I can find a use for even the smallest scraps. The vegetable tanned leather comes from Italy, and the heels and platforms in cork and wood are hand turned in Norfolk…

Read the rest of this interview and see more illustrations of Nina Dolcetti’s shoes in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
The Pipettes by Emma Block
The Pipettes by Emma Block.

It’s been a long run up to the official launch of Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration… but on Friday it was finally party time at 123 Bethnal Green Road.

ACOFI launch Lily Vanilli cake
Bespoke Lily Vanilli cakes for the launch.

My day began with a speedy cycle up to get my hair *done* at Shine on the Green up in Stoke Newington, medications possibly not foreseeing the consequences of cycling back again against a strong wind. In the end my new glossy look held up admirably well, troche and was admired by everyone.

ACOFI launch Jan 11 Shine on Green
Getting my hair *done* at Shine on the Green.

Matt Bramford and Sally Mumby-Croft then joined me to help lug boxes of goodie bag gifts from my house over to 123 Bethnal Green Road – the delay ensuring the miraculous delivery of my beautiful Joanna Cave earrings which made it just in time from Greece.

ACOFI launch Jan 11-Matt Bramford
Matt carrying boxes.

By this time we were running seriously behind, pharm so goodie bag stuffing took on a somewhat manic quality. Luckily Lucy and Nicholas soon joined us from Forward PR, followed by the lovely Heather and Felicity of Dr.Hauschka. Thank god I didn’t try to stuff the goodie bags at home by myself.

ACOFI launch Jan 11-packing bags
Packing the goodie bags.

Felicity whisked me upstairs to apply my Dr.Hauschka make up in super speedy style (why were make up artists never this fast when I did fashion shoots?!) and I emerged looking super polished and sleek. Perfect. I totally attribute all the compliments I received on the night to the skills of Shine on the Green and Dr.Hauschka. Now if only I could achieve the same effect by myself! The next day my boyfriend commented that I looked like a scarecrow once again. Sigh. Now I know why famous people depend so much on their teams of stylists.

ACOFI launch Jan 11-Dr.Hauschka makeup
Felicity from Dr.Hauschka applies my makeup.

We finished with minutes to spare and I dashed downstairs to find already in place my crew of eager illustrators, Alexandra with her Pukka tea goodness… and the glorious pearlescent handiwork of Lily Vanilli perfectly arranged in the central archway just as the guests started to turn up. By this stage I realised I hadn’t eaten anything since my 7am breakfast of porridge, on which I blame the development of a strange form of reverse word Tourettes (I think Matt Bramford may mention one classic moment in his blog). It’s a miracle I made any sense in interviews.

ACOFI launch Jan 11-Lily Vanilli
A close up of the fabulous Lily Vanilli concoction.

Laurel from i-D was one of the first to arrive and between 3-7pm the cosy Bunker Cafe was a whirlwind of activity.

Laurel Harple of i-D by Antonia Parker
Laurel Harple of i-D by Antonia Parker.

Everyone admired my lilac Beautiful Soul cape, Joanna Cave earrings and Nina Dolcetti shoes… which were exceedingly comfortable as promised by the designer Elisalex.

Jenny Robins creates a live sketch
Jenny Robins creates a live sketch.

ACOFI launch-Liz Johnson-Artur-Andrea Peterson
Andrea Peterson producing a live sketch. Photography by Liz Johnson-Artur.

Andrea Peterson Nyla
Andrea’s finished illustration of Nyla from Ethical Heaven.

ACOFI launch-Liz Johnson-Artur-Michelle Urvall Nyren & AbbyWright
Illustrators Michelle Urvall Nyren and Abby Wright. Photography by Liz Johnson-Artur.

I was thrilled that so many people came – and it was wonderful to chat to so many bloggers that I’ve only met in the online world and then watch them being illustrated in a variety of utterly unique styles.

MattBramford_ACOFI_Gabby Young&Andrea Peterson
Gabby Young popped in to say hello!

Guests also received a relaxing hand massage the Dr.Hauschka way thanks to Felicity. The piles of Lily Vanilli mini scones and brownies quickly vanished, washed down with Pukka tea served in vintage teacups courtesy of 123 Bethnal Green Road.

ACOFI launch-Laurel Harple-Dr.Hauschka, Laurel i-D
Laurel Harple receives a Dr.Hauschka hand massage.

ACOFI launch-Liz Johnson-Artur-Susie Bubble
Susie Bubble. Photography by Liz Johnson-Artur.

ACOFI launch-Liz Johnson-Artur-Prince Cassius
Prince Cassius. Photography by Liz Johnson-Artur.

MattBramford_ACOFI_Jessica Bumpus, Amelia, Rebekah Roy
With Jessica Bumpus of Vogue and stylist Rebekah Roy. Photography by Matt Bramford.

By 7pm people started to arrive for the evening party and I realised that my wobbling had less to do with my Nina Dolcetti platforms and more to do with my lack of blood sugar. But then Jessica Bumpus from Vogue arrived and the adrenalin must have kicked in because I carried on straight through the evening without food, drink, or even a pee.

Jessica Bumpus of Vogue by Artist Andrea
Jessica Bumpus of Vogue by Andrea Peterson.

ACOFI launch-Amelia Gregory-6 Day Riot
6 Day Riot.

Upstairs 6 Day Riot kick started the night’s proceedings with a set of rollicking tunes, singer Tamara easily charming the room and converting a whole new army of fans.

ACOFI launch-Max Petrossi-The Pipettes
The Pipettes. Photography by Max Petrossi.

Then lovely Pipettes Gwenno and Ani Saunders took to the decks in their inimitable polka dot outfits and got everyone dancing, lubricated by oodles of delicious Adnams beers and Vodka O.

ACOFI launch-Liz Johnson-Artur-Laura ForwardPR
Laura of Forward PR was a star behind the bar.

Our bar was woefully understaffed (my fault entirely) and I thought for a moment that I would have to step in and help out, but in the end Nicholas and Laura of Forward PR managed brilliantly and kept up the energy with lots of dance moves: much admiration and thanks. By the end of the night I hear that even The Pipettes were doing a stint behind the bar. Community effort, now that’s what I like!

ACOFI launch-Max Petrossi-Ballad Of and party
Ballad Of and other guests. Photography by Max Petrossi.

Downstairs Forward PR‘s Francesca proved an amazing saleswoman, shifting loads of books in my specially made fabric goodie bags containing a bespoke Moleskine notebook, my special Tatty Devine Cutlass Necklace in a new colourway, Dr.Hauschka goodies aplenty, Pukka teabags, a reclaimed leather heart keyring from 123, a copy of the last ever issue of Amelia’s Magazine in print and a stack of limited edition postcards. Thankyou so much everyone who bought a book – I really really appreciate it.

ACOFI launch Jan 11-goodie bags
The huge pile of goodie bags.

I also got to cut the enormous pink flowery centrepiece by Lily Vanilli, which, being double tiered, did indeed look like a totally bonkers wedding cake. Harriet of Tatty Devine then did sterling business cutting it up and handing out the delicious white chocolate fluffy concoction to appreciative guests.

MattBramford_ACOFI_Amelia Gregory
Cutting the cake. Photography by Matt Bramford.

MattBramford_ACOFI_PrickYrFinger,Amelia,TattyDevine
With my ladies Rachael and Louise from Prick Your Finger and Harriet and Rosie of Tatty Devine.

Towards the end of the night my old friend Will of the Mystery Jets arrived and put in a stonking last set, accompanied on the decks by his beautiful female friends. And the Robots in Disguise put in a fashionably late appearance.

ACOFI launch Jan 11-Will Mystery jets
Will of the Mystery Jets with his friends.

Robots in Disguise with Amelia
Robots in Disguise were in my first ever Amelia’s Magazine. They’re ace. Photography by Matt Bramford.

Many thanks to everyone who helped out on the night, especially my star contributors Matt and Sally and of course the wonderful Courtney and her team from Forward PR: Laura, Francesca and Nicholas. And huge thanks to Ross and Michelle of 123 Bethnal Green Road for hosting such a memorable party, the illustrators who helped out, Liz Johnson-Artur and Max Petrossi for taking photos, Beautiful Soul, Nina Dolcetti and Joanna Cave for their wonderful designs and 6 Day Riot, The Pipettes and Will for entertaining my guests. More massive thanks to my partners – 123, Tatty Devine, Moleskine, Dr.Hauschka, Lily Vanilli, Pukka Teas, Adnams and Vodka O – for ensuring a truly memorable event.

ACOFI launch Jan 11-Lily Vanilli cake
Decimating the cake.

And of course I can’t leave out a big thanks (I’m running out of large adjectives here) to all my guests, especially all of those who bought the book and have written such a wealth of amazing blog posts about the event. I am so sorry I didn’t get to meet everyone, but thankyou thankyou thankyou for supporting my ACOFI adventure xxx

ACOFI launch Jan 11-clear up
Cleaning up the next day: teacups and limes. Just about sums it up!

If you didn’t get a chance to do so at the launch do remember to get along and check out the Eco Pop Up shop instore at 123 for two weeks from the 28th January. It features many of the fabulous ethical designers from my book. Look out for lots of blogs featuring illustrations from the event… coming up shortly. And you can buy the book online on my website with a special 10% if you use the discount code ACOFI LAUNCH up until the 28th February 2011. Don’t forget to also check out the Skype video interviews with featured illustrators in the book over on my Amelia’s House youtube channel.

Categories ,123 Bethnal Green Road, ,6 Day Riot, ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Andrea Peterson, ,Ani Saunders, ,Antonia Parker, ,Beautiful Soul, ,Bunker Cafe, ,Courtney Blackman, ,Dr.Hauschka, ,Eco fashion, ,Emma Block, ,Ethical Fashion, ,Ethical Heaven, ,gabby young, ,Gwenno Saunders, ,i-D, ,Jessica Bumpus, ,Joanna Cave, ,Laurel Harple, ,Liz Johnson-Artur, ,Matt Bramford, ,Max Petrossi, ,Moleskine, ,Mystery Jets, ,Nina Dolcetti, ,Nyla, ,Prick your Finger, ,Prince Cassius, ,Rebekah Roy, ,Robots in Disguise, ,Scout Hut, ,Shine on the Green, ,The Pipettes, ,vogue

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Amelia’s Magazine | Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration Launch Party Review: by Amelia

Nina Dolcetti by Natsuki Otani
Nina Dolcetti by Natsuki Otani.

Were you already considering how to make ethical shoes whilst you were studying at Cordwainers?
Absolutely. I come from a family of ethical fashion pioneers (Orsola de Castro of From Somewhere is my Mum), side effects store so it was a no-brainer for me. I know too much about the quantity of waste produced by the fashion industry and the exploitation of people and environment, link so of course I was set on running my label as ethically and morally as I could.

When did you first start to work with your signature wedge and what was the process of finding the perfect shape?
The first drawing I did of my signature curved wedge was in a quiet moment at my first Estethica exhibition at London Fashion Week in 2008, stuff when I was eight months pregnant. The wave of inspiration for my next collection had just hit me and I was absorbed in my new designs. It wasn’t until much later that I realised that the curve of the wedge was the exact line, only reversed, of the instep. And thinking about it now, I think the pregnancy definitely had something to do with it too!

Where do you source your materials from? 
I source my offcuts from anywhere and everywhere. I’ve found amazing textured leathers in markets in Spain, been given boxes of beautiful offcuts from other designers, and raided bins in factories. I can find a use for even the smallest scraps. The vegetable tanned leather comes from Italy, and the heels and platforms in cork and wood are hand turned in Norfolk…

Read the rest of this interview and see more illustrations of Nina Dolcetti’s shoes in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
Nina Dolcetti by Natsuki Otani
Nina Dolcetti by Natsuki Otani.

Were you already considering how to make ethical shoes whilst you were studying at Cordwainers?
Absolutely. I come from a family of ethical fashion pioneers (Orsola de Castro of From Somewhere is my Mum), abortion so it was a no-brainer for me. I know too much about the quantity of waste produced by the fashion industry and the exploitation of people and environment, so of course I was set on running my label as ethically and morally as I could.

When did you first start to work with your signature wedge and what was the process of finding the perfect shape?
The first drawing I did of my signature curved wedge was in a quiet moment at my first Estethica exhibition at London Fashion Week in 2008, when I was eight months pregnant. The wave of inspiration for my next collection had just hit me and I was absorbed in my new designs. It wasn’t until much later that I realised that the curve of the wedge was the exact line, only reversed, of the instep. And thinking about it now, I think the pregnancy definitely had something to do with it too!

Where do you source your materials from? 
I source my offcuts from anywhere and everywhere. I’ve found amazing textured leathers in markets in Spain, been given boxes of beautiful offcuts from other designers, and raided bins in factories. I can find a use for even the smallest scraps. The vegetable tanned leather comes from Italy, and the heels and platforms in cork and wood are hand turned in Norfolk…

Read the rest of this interview and see more illustrations of Nina Dolcetti’s shoes in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
Nina Dolcetti by Natsuki Otani
Nina Dolcetti by Natsuki Otani.

Were you already considering how to make ethical shoes whilst you were studying at Cordwainers?
Absolutely. I come from a family of ethical fashion pioneers (Orsola de Castro of From Somewhere is my Mum), price so it was a no-brainer for me. I know too much about the quantity of waste produced by the fashion industry and the exploitation of people and environment, ailment so of course I was set on running my label as ethically and morally as I could.

When did you first start to work with your signature wedge and what was the process of finding the perfect shape?
The first drawing I did of my signature curved wedge was in a quiet moment at my first Estethica exhibition at London Fashion Week in 2008, when I was eight months pregnant. The wave of inspiration for my next collection had just hit me and I was absorbed in my new designs. It wasn’t until much later that I realised that the curve of the wedge was the exact line, only reversed, of the instep. And thinking about it now, I think the pregnancy definitely had something to do with it too!

Where do you source your materials from? 
I source my offcuts from anywhere and everywhere. I’ve found amazing textured leathers in markets in Spain, been given boxes of beautiful offcuts from other designers, and raided bins in factories. I can find a use for even the smallest scraps. The vegetable tanned leather comes from Italy, and the heels and platforms in cork and wood are hand turned in Norfolk…

Read the rest of this interview and see more illustrations of Nina Dolcetti’s shoes in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
Nina Dolcetti by Natsuki Otani
Nina Dolcetti by Natsuki Otani.

Were you already considering how to make ethical shoes whilst you were studying at Cordwainers?
Absolutely. I come from a family of ethical fashion pioneers (Orsola de Castro of From Somewhere is my Mum), viagra approved so it was a no-brainer for me. I know too much about the quantity of waste produced by the fashion industry and the exploitation of people and environment, so of course I was set on running my label as ethically and morally as I could.

When did you first start to work with your signature wedge and what was the process of finding the perfect shape?
The first drawing I did of my signature curved wedge was in a quiet moment at my first Estethica exhibition at London Fashion Week in 2008, when I was eight months pregnant. The wave of inspiration for my next collection had just hit me and I was absorbed in my new designs. It wasn’t until much later that I realised that the curve of the wedge was the exact line, only reversed, of the instep. And thinking about it now, I think the pregnancy definitely had something to do with it too!

Where do you source your materials from? 
I source my offcuts from anywhere and everywhere. I’ve found amazing textured leathers in markets in Spain, been given boxes of beautiful offcuts from other designers, and raided bins in factories. I can find a use for even the smallest scraps. The vegetable tanned leather comes from Italy, and the heels and platforms in cork and wood are hand turned in Norfolk…

Read the rest of this interview and see more illustrations of Nina Dolcetti’s shoes in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
The Pipettes by Emma Block
The Pipettes by Emma Block.

It’s been a long run up to the official launch of Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration… but on Friday it was finally party time at 123 Bethnal Green Road.

ACOFI launch Lily Vanilli cake
Bespoke Lily Vanilli cakes for the launch.

My day began with a speedy cycle up to get my hair *done* at Shine on the Green up in Stoke Newington, medications possibly not foreseeing the consequences of cycling back again against a strong wind. In the end my new glossy look held up admirably well, troche and was admired by everyone.

ACOFI launch Jan 11 Shine on Green
Getting my hair *done* at Shine on the Green.

Matt Bramford and Sally Mumby-Croft then joined me to help lug boxes of goodie bag gifts from my house over to 123 Bethnal Green Road – the delay ensuring the miraculous delivery of my beautiful Joanna Cave earrings which made it just in time from Greece.

ACOFI launch Jan 11-Matt Bramford
Matt carrying boxes.

By this time we were running seriously behind, pharm so goodie bag stuffing took on a somewhat manic quality. Luckily Lucy and Nicholas soon joined us from Forward PR, followed by the lovely Heather and Felicity of Dr.Hauschka. Thank god I didn’t try to stuff the goodie bags at home by myself.

ACOFI launch Jan 11-packing bags
Packing the goodie bags.

Felicity whisked me upstairs to apply my Dr.Hauschka make up in super speedy style (why were make up artists never this fast when I did fashion shoots?!) and I emerged looking super polished and sleek. Perfect. I totally attribute all the compliments I received on the night to the skills of Shine on the Green and Dr.Hauschka. Now if only I could achieve the same effect by myself! The next day my boyfriend commented that I looked like a scarecrow once again. Sigh. Now I know why famous people depend so much on their teams of stylists.

ACOFI launch Jan 11-Dr.Hauschka makeup
Felicity from Dr.Hauschka applies my makeup.

We finished with minutes to spare and I dashed downstairs to find already in place my crew of eager illustrators, Alexandra with her Pukka tea goodness… and the glorious pearlescent handiwork of Lily Vanilli perfectly arranged in the central archway just as the guests started to turn up. By this stage I realised I hadn’t eaten anything since my 7am breakfast of porridge, on which I blame the development of a strange form of reverse word Tourettes (I think Matt Bramford may mention one classic moment in his blog). It’s a miracle I made any sense in interviews.

ACOFI launch Jan 11-Lily Vanilli
A close up of the fabulous Lily Vanilli concoction.

Laurel from i-D was one of the first to arrive and between 3-7pm the cosy Bunker Cafe was a whirlwind of activity.

Laurel Harple of i-D by Antonia Parker
Laurel Harple of i-D by Antonia Parker.

Everyone admired my lilac Beautiful Soul cape, Joanna Cave earrings and Nina Dolcetti shoes… which were exceedingly comfortable as promised by the designer Elisalex.

Jenny Robins creates a live sketch
Jenny Robins creates a live sketch.

ACOFI launch-Liz Johnson-Artur-Andrea Peterson
Andrea Peterson producing a live sketch. Photography by Liz Johnson-Artur.

Andrea Peterson Nyla
Andrea’s finished illustration of Nyla from Ethical Heaven.

ACOFI launch-Liz Johnson-Artur-Michelle Urvall Nyren & AbbyWright
Illustrators Michelle Urvall Nyren and Abby Wright. Photography by Liz Johnson-Artur.

I was thrilled that so many people came – and it was wonderful to chat to so many bloggers that I’ve only met in the online world and then watch them being illustrated in a variety of utterly unique styles.

MattBramford_ACOFI_Gabby Young&Andrea Peterson
Gabby Young popped in to say hello!

Guests also received a relaxing hand massage the Dr.Hauschka way thanks to Felicity. The piles of Lily Vanilli mini scones and brownies quickly vanished, washed down with Pukka tea served in vintage teacups courtesy of 123 Bethnal Green Road.

ACOFI launch-Laurel Harple-Dr.Hauschka, Laurel i-D
Laurel Harple receives a Dr.Hauschka hand massage.

ACOFI launch-Liz Johnson-Artur-Susie Bubble
Susie Bubble. Photography by Liz Johnson-Artur.

ACOFI launch-Liz Johnson-Artur-Prince Cassius
Prince Cassius. Photography by Liz Johnson-Artur.

MattBramford_ACOFI_Jessica Bumpus, Amelia, Rebekah Roy
With Jessica Bumpus of Vogue and stylist Rebekah Roy. Photography by Matt Bramford.

By 7pm people started to arrive for the evening party and I realised that my wobbling had less to do with my Nina Dolcetti platforms and more to do with my lack of blood sugar. But then Jessica Bumpus from Vogue arrived and the adrenalin must have kicked in because I carried on straight through the evening without food, drink, or even a pee.

Jessica Bumpus of Vogue by Artist Andrea
Jessica Bumpus of Vogue by Andrea Peterson.

ACOFI launch-Amelia Gregory-6 Day Riot
6 Day Riot.

Upstairs 6 Day Riot kick started the night’s proceedings with a set of rollicking tunes, singer Tamara easily charming the room and converting a whole new army of fans.

ACOFI launch-Max Petrossi-The Pipettes
The Pipettes. Photography by Max Petrossi.

Then lovely Pipettes Gwenno and Ani Saunders took to the decks in their inimitable polka dot outfits and got everyone dancing, lubricated by oodles of delicious Adnams beers and Vodka O.

ACOFI launch-Liz Johnson-Artur-Laura ForwardPR
Laura of Forward PR was a star behind the bar.

Our bar was woefully understaffed (my fault entirely) and I thought for a moment that I would have to step in and help out, but in the end Nicholas and Laura of Forward PR managed brilliantly and kept up the energy with lots of dance moves: much admiration and thanks. By the end of the night I hear that even The Pipettes were doing a stint behind the bar. Community effort, now that’s what I like!

ACOFI launch-Max Petrossi-Ballad Of and party
Ballad Of and other guests. Photography by Max Petrossi.

Downstairs Forward PR‘s Francesca proved an amazing saleswoman, shifting loads of books in my specially made fabric goodie bags containing a bespoke Moleskine notebook, my special Tatty Devine Cutlass Necklace in a new colourway, Dr.Hauschka goodies aplenty, Pukka teabags, a reclaimed leather heart keyring from 123, a copy of the last ever issue of Amelia’s Magazine in print and a stack of limited edition postcards. Thankyou so much everyone who bought a book – I really really appreciate it.

ACOFI launch Jan 11-goodie bags
The huge pile of goodie bags.

I also got to cut the enormous pink flowery centrepiece by Lily Vanilli, which, being double tiered, did indeed look like a totally bonkers wedding cake. Harriet of Tatty Devine then did sterling business cutting it up and handing out the delicious white chocolate fluffy concoction to appreciative guests.

MattBramford_ACOFI_Amelia Gregory
Cutting the cake. Photography by Matt Bramford.

MattBramford_ACOFI_PrickYrFinger,Amelia,TattyDevine
With my ladies Rachael and Louise from Prick Your Finger and Harriet and Rosie of Tatty Devine.

Towards the end of the night my old friend Will of the Mystery Jets arrived and put in a stonking last set, accompanied on the decks by his beautiful female friends. And the Robots in Disguise put in a fashionably late appearance.

ACOFI launch Jan 11-Will Mystery jets
Will of the Mystery Jets with his friends.

Robots in Disguise with Amelia
Robots in Disguise were in my first ever Amelia’s Magazine. They’re ace. Photography by Matt Bramford.

Many thanks to everyone who helped out on the night, especially my star contributors Matt and Sally and of course the wonderful Courtney and her team from Forward PR: Laura, Francesca and Nicholas. And huge thanks to Ross and Michelle of 123 Bethnal Green Road for hosting such a memorable party, the illustrators who helped out, Liz Johnson-Artur and Max Petrossi for taking photos, Beautiful Soul, Nina Dolcetti and Joanna Cave for their wonderful designs and 6 Day Riot, The Pipettes and Will for entertaining my guests. More massive thanks to my partners – 123, Tatty Devine, Moleskine, Dr.Hauschka, Lily Vanilli, Pukka Teas, Adnams and Vodka O – for ensuring a truly memorable event.

ACOFI launch Jan 11-Lily Vanilli cake
Decimating the cake.

And of course I can’t leave out a big thanks (I’m running out of large adjectives here) to all my guests, especially all of those who bought the book and have written such a wealth of amazing blog posts about the event. I am so sorry I didn’t get to meet everyone, but thankyou thankyou thankyou for supporting my ACOFI adventure xxx

ACOFI launch Jan 11-clear up
Cleaning up the next day: teacups and limes. Just about sums it up!

If you didn’t get a chance to do so at the launch do remember to get along and check out the Eco Pop Up shop instore at 123 for two weeks from the 28th January. It features many of the fabulous ethical designers from my book. Look out for lots of blogs featuring illustrations from the event… coming up shortly. And you can buy the book online on my website with a special 10% if you use the discount code ACOFI LAUNCH up until the 28th February 2011. Don’t forget to also check out the Skype video interviews with featured illustrators in the book over on my Amelia’s House youtube channel.

Categories ,123 Bethnal Green Road, ,6 Day Riot, ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Andrea Peterson, ,Ani Saunders, ,Antonia Parker, ,Beautiful Soul, ,Bunker Cafe, ,Courtney Blackman, ,Dr.Hauschka, ,Eco fashion, ,Emma Block, ,Ethical Fashion, ,Ethical Heaven, ,gabby young, ,Gwenno Saunders, ,i-D, ,Jessica Bumpus, ,Joanna Cave, ,Laurel Harple, ,Liz Johnson-Artur, ,Matt Bramford, ,Max Petrossi, ,Moleskine, ,Mystery Jets, ,Nina Dolcetti, ,Nyla, ,Prick your Finger, ,Prince Cassius, ,Rebekah Roy, ,Robots in Disguise, ,Scout Hut, ,Shine on the Green, ,The Pipettes, ,vogue

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Amelia’s Magazine | Jack Teagle opens up shop

Flyer designed by Russell Palmer

Two years since their first show in the basement of Shoreditch Town Hall, more about Circuit Wisely presented 17 Artists in an East London live-work space. This second exhibition asked artists to respond to the location and ‘architecture’ of a residential building, investigating its scope for possible comment on the contested geography of East London.

Emily Whitebread Stills from a Film (2010)

The artists work (of which I was one) had to be temporal and capable of negotiating the duplicitous communal spaces of the building, such as the car park, balconies, stairwells, lifts and terraces. Circuit Wisely made it implict that the artwork was not to impinge on the everyday movement occurring within the building, pushing the artists to consider how their work would be installed without marking the building and it’s context within the geographical location.

The exhibition began on the ground level of the first stairwell, Mihaela Brebenel’s installation 1 to 7; G to 6A – Loose Ends invited the viewer to follow the woolen thread wrapped around the handrails and architectural piping. Mihaela’s work explored the notion of navigating a particular space – through externalising the internal sources of what one does and does not see upon entering a residential building.

Mihaela Brebenel 1 to 7; G to 6A – Loose Ends

Continuing upwards, I passed Richard King’s decorative installation and a burning red screen-print by Daniel Wilkins. However my attention was held by Ben Fox’sculptural shanty-town: Sublet City. The contrasting nature of the contemporary East London building and Fox’s fragile houses echo the rapid development of East London, where an organic mixture of old and new is being skewed by the rapid destruction of original property in favour of the new. Beautifully made from found materials, it is accompanied by ‘the house shelters day-dreaming, the house protects the dreamer, the house allows one to dream in peace.’

Richard King Untitled

Dan Wilkins Untitled (2008)

Ben Fox Sublet City

The next level was occupied by Will Jennings’ Portfolio. A critical reflection on the building’s owner and his vast property ‘portfolio’. The publication with it’s selected photography and investigative text aims to create a dialogue between shared landscape and the increasing capitalisation of the concept of home. It is rare that such an opportunity for a piece of work criticising the building is installed in the location that it is criticising. It was interesting to see the interaction and discussion this piece caused with the residence of the building presenting them with the opportunity to re-think their living space. A favourable comparison to make is Hans Haacke’s ‘Shapolsky et al., Manhattan Real Estate Holdings, a Real-Time Social System as of May 1,1971′.

Will Jennings Portfolio

After reading the Portfolio, I continue to walk up the stairs and see Richard King’s second ornamental piece. Hanging in the window, on the level above, the back drop being the East London Skyline, are three beautiful photographs by Alex Ressel.

Richard King Untitled

Alex Ressel A Three Frame Film

‘DIAL 2-2-4-9 AND POINT TO THE SKY’ a vinyl text piece standing opposite a comical 3D image Lost in Space. The image of a famous Robot appears to vibrate from the paper and into a form of hologram – this I am seeing without the help of 3D glasses.

After the completing the stairwell, I made my way to Charlotte Gibson’s Sitting Room Installation made my eyes pop! The collection of brightly coloured collages, furniture, lamps, china, jelly, plastic and string are are arranged in such a way that the space that is inbetween them becomes more important by the string that attaches them, the water and jelly that resides in them and the shadows that are casted by the array of objects.

Charlotte Gibson Sitting Room Installation

Natascha Nanji’s A Tail of Two Cities occupied the lift in the second stairwell. The ceiling was covered with punctured black rubber, the work physically inserted itself into the lift through the weight of the shells contained within the black fabric. The imposition of the transformed the lift experience, from everyday to the uncanny. On one journey a chattering couple walked in unaware of what was above their heads, until a shell grazed the top of the man’s head, alarming him and drawing his attention to the ceiling. A scene from a horror film perhaps?

Natascha Nanji A Tale of Two Cities

After coming down in the lift, I returned to the 5th Floor to find the walkway occupied by Zoe Paul’s Buoy and the terrace contained Susanna JP Byrne’s Cy Cartographer No. Sculpture. Standing tall, the sculpture looks out towards the city – reminiscent of a century guard, looking out over the London landscape. The copper wire felt referential of a school science project and the tripod’s brightly coloured poles appeared similar to the yard sticks used to measure playing fields during practical geography lessons.


Susanna JP Byrne Cy Cartographer No. Sculpture

Zoe Paul Buoy Photograph by Selvi May

Marnie Hollande’s performance piece Gas wowed the audience on the exhibition’s opening night. A figure emerged onto the walkway, her face covered by a shimmering midnight blue mask, the body cloaked in chiffon with attached balloons. Moving onto the terrace to continue the performance, the body and balloons struggled against both the wind and crowd.. The exceptionally strong wind increased the movements of the performer moving within the constraints of her costume. At one point, balloons detached themselves from the costume and were carried into the darkness.

Marnie Hollande Gas

On reflection Jennings, Dray, Fox and Bryne’s pieces directly tackled the building’s geographical location. The other pieces included by Circuit Wisely responded more directly towards the architecture, whereas others echoed the idea of ornamentation. Personally, the importance of the exhibition, lay in tracing perspectives and making connections between the work within the building’s parameters. Circuit Wisely shift away from the stress and importance of individual works when umbrellaed into a singular meaning all too common with groups shows.

The exciting thing about Circuit Wisely is not just the diversity of work on display but the transition they have gone through as a collective of curators. The success of CWII were that the visitor appeared to be completely free to move about the building, but were fact deliberately manoeuvred to encounter the work in relationship to the various movements one can make within the space. The curation and choice of art works allows visitors to experience different environments and transports them from a block of flats to an interesting space for creative people to come together and display work. This show is successful as it is not constrained by the gallery space. It is a platform for the viewer to encounter works in different environments heightening their experience of viewing a group show – and this is the success of the Circuit Wisely curatorial team.

All Photographs by Circuit Wisely

Jack Teagle heroes and villains
Heroes and Villains by Jack Teagle. I *heart* this image.

You may remember that I had a fabulous time at Jack Teagle’s exhibition at Nobrow earlier this year. Then I saw a tweet about his brand new shop and thought it might be time to catch up with one of my favourite illustrators…

What else has been happening since your Dungeons and Desktops exhibition at Nobrow earlier this year?
Just recently I finished my second solo show over in Porto, buy Portugal at the Galeria Dama Aflita. The title was ‘Zona de Combate’ and the focus was on my wrestlers and pop-culture violence. I’ve been contributing to group shows too. The Monsterbation show at the Pony Club in Portland, dosage Oregon, and Tennis Apocalypse, a show in Seattle.

Jack Teagle exhibition

Another group show is coming up in Porto at the end of this year which I will be contributing too as well. I’ve just worked with Mario, the creator of the ‘Causeineedit blog to create a limited run of tshirts, which you can see here. There’s always an exhibition or a publication to work towards, so it’s exciting. I’ve done some editorial illustrations as well as some commercial projects and book design. I’ve been working on painting more, but illustration is something I really want to get my teeth into properly.

Jack Teagle prints

Why the online shop? What are you selling on there?
After selling paintings at shows, I realised that a lot of people were after certain pictures, but they had already been bought up. Painting – then immediately selling the image – wasn’t getting the most out of my work, so I thought a lot more people could enjoy these pictures if I made some up into Giclee prints. I wanted to expand my little business too.

Best buys from your store for:
Granny: Woodland Print
Baby: Skateboarding Cat
Big sister: Happy Print
Little brother? Heroes and Villains Print

You’ve been inspired by a lot of movie monsters – have your favourites changed over the years?
I think some have and some haven’t. I love Nosferatu now, as a child I would have found him a little dull. I loved the totally bizarre monsters, my favourite would have to be The Creature from the Black Lagoon, it’s just such a great design. I’ve always loved mutants and animal hybrids too, especially the Fly.

fear and misery_jack teagle
Fear and Misery prints by Jack Teagle.

What’s the best classic horror movie?
For me it’s Invasion of the Body Snatchers. It still scares me to this day now. It has the most unsettling atmosphere and sense of claustrophobia. Gore and visual effects don’t really do anything for me. It was just down to the mystery and the atmosphere, I remember first watching and wondering what in God’s name are those pods!

What’s this about the Daddy Donkey Mexican Grill?
Daddy Donkey was really fun to work on. I got the job through the YCN. Joel, the owner of the Daddy Donkey chain saw some of my older wrestling work and hand-drawn text and wanted me to work on some Luchador inspired artwork.

How is life in the south west?
It’s been pretty cool recently, I’ve just been working away. Not much happens, but I can finally drive, so that relieves some boredom. It’s always a relaxed atmosphere down this way. I travel up whenever I can, usually to meet clients and see how things are going, every few months (I should get up more often!) My top tip would be, only megabus a journey if absolutely needed! The train is the way to go, the extra money is worth it. I felt like a sardine every time I went on megabus.

Jack Teagle characters wrestling

Who makes the best sketchbooks?
I’m still searching for the perfect sketchbook! I change format every now and then to keep things fresh. I did use Moleskine, but they tend to fall apart if you carry them around a lot. I love a sketchbook with good paper and usually a good hard cover. The Handbook Travelogue sketchbooks are the best I’ve found so far.

I got a bit of a shock the other day when I opened my local East End rag and saw a little piece about a collaboration you’ve done with the Museum of London. Tell me more about Oscar Kirk’s 1919 diary….
I was contacted through Anorak Magazine to work on a project with a few other illustrators on Oscar Kirk’s diary. Oscar was a 14 year old boy who worked on the docks in 1919 and kept a diary which gives a good look on life back then. He also kept the weather and what he had to eat. We were all given a diary extract to illustrate, and then the finished images were published in Anorak Magazine with the original text. The pages were also blown up and put on display in the Museum of London. (We did an exclusive interview with Cathy Olmedillas, founder of Anorak Magazine: to read it click here)

What have you got planned for 2011?
I want to get some more solo shows sorted out, maybe set out to try some resin cast toys too. At the moment the plan is to keep working hard and to chase any opportunity that comes knocking!

You can check out Jack’s shop right here. I’d grab yourself a bit of the action as soon as you can…

Categories ,Daddy Donkey, ,Galeria Dama Aflita, ,Handbook Travelogue, ,Jack Teagle, ,Luchador, ,Moleskine, ,Monsterbation, ,Museum of London Docklands, ,Nobrow, ,Nosferatu, ,Online Shop, ,Oregon, ,Oscar Kirk, ,Pony Club, ,portland, ,Portugal, ,seattle, ,Tennis Apocalypse, ,YCN

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Amelia’s Magazine | Creative Review Tweetup at the Design Museum: An insider’s perspective

crtweetup_exhibition_opens_at_the_Design_Museum_Space_photobyHali_O
Photo by Halima O.

Last Thursday the first ever Creative Review tweetup took place at London’s Design Museum. As Amelia had so many other engagments – what with it being both London Fashion Week and the London Design Festival – she asked me to report back on how things went.

FlickrTwitter_mashup_ap_by Nice Agency_photo by ShantyUK
A twitter mashup, photo by ShantyUK.

I’ve been tweeting for Creative Review for about sixteen months now, and it’s always been obvious that there’s a community made up of a particular type of creative person that uses the network; generally the friendly type keen to share news of things that interest them. The tweetup was a chance for them to come together, no matter what their creative discipline, but the bulk of guests comprised illustrators and graphic designers.

Collaborative_doodles_Photo by ShantyUK
Collaborative doodles. Photo by ShantyUK.

Proceedings kicked off at seven in the Museum’s lobby, with guests enjoying a free drink courtesy of the only commercial sponsor of the evening. The Design Museum had kept its shop open and a cash bar was operating too. The event was partnered by Moleskine and the LEGO group, and as well as the drink, on arrival each guest received a little CR branded Moleskine sketchbook.

Collaborative doodling
Collaborative doodling.

Activities started with a bit of sketching too. There was a ‘never-ending’ 2 x 8 metre roll of 200gsm sketchpaper covering a large square table that fit about a dozen people around it, and a load of fibre-tipped pens, pencils and charcoal for filling it up with scribble. Several people seemed to spend most of the night immersed in this one activity, but they missed out on the rest of what the museum had to offer. After a couple of drinks, a bit of a chat and a doodle, most went on to explore the rest of the space, arriving first at the impressive BRIT Designs of the Year exhibition, which will soon be coming to an end. As well as featuring some impressive sustainability projects.

Communal LEGO building
Communal LEGO building.

For many, the main event took place on the very top floor of the Museum, in the just opened John Pawson exhibition. This exhibition is one of pristine minimalism, with a beautiful reproduction of a Japanese monastery, a hall-spanning bench made from Douglas fir and a floor embedded with materials product design arranged with as much care and forethought as a feng shui-inspired garden. Very few of the guests would have been able to enjoy this peaceful impression however, as by the time most of the more sociable crowd arrived on the third floor, the space had been taken over by cross-legged adults attempting to build representations of their ideal homes from LEGO.

CR_Lego
A LEGO installation.

When it came to the time for me to announce that LEGO play was almost at an end and the evening’s piece de resistance was about to be unveiled, there were more than several looks of disappointment. Still, everyone got to keep the LEGO that they hadn’t made use of, which was not an inconsiderable amount. The final stage of the evening was an impromptu exhibition put together by Creative Review staff that was comprised of individual pieces of work the guests had brought along with them. Here’s a look at some of the work that was done on the night: with photos taken by various attendees.

Illustration by Jitesh Patel_Photo by ShantyUK
Illustration by Jitesh Patel. Photo by ShantyUK.

All in all most people seemed to get a kick out of the evening, and there’s been plenty of talk at Creative Review about putting on something similar in the future, perhaps looking north though, to Birmingham, Manchester or Scotland. In the meantime you can follow me on twitter @NeilAyres.

Categories ,Creative Review, ,Design Museum, ,Jitesh Patel, ,John Pawson, ,Lego, ,Moleskine, ,Neil Ayres, ,ShantyUK, ,Tweetup, ,twitter

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Amelia’s Magazine | Creative Review Tweetup at the Design Museum: An insider’s perspective

crtweetup_exhibition_opens_at_the_Design_Museum_Space_photobyHali_O
Photo by Halima O.

Last Thursday the first ever Creative Review tweetup took place at London’s Design Museum. As Amelia had so many other engagments – what with it being both London Fashion Week and the London Design Festival – she asked me to report back on how things went.

FlickrTwitter_mashup_ap_by Nice Agency_photo by ShantyUK
A twitter mashup, page photo by ShantyUK.

I’ve been tweeting for Creative Review for about sixteen months now, and it’s always been obvious that there’s a community made up of a particular type of creative person that uses the network; generally the friendly type keen to share news of things that interest them. The tweetup was a chance for them to come together, no matter what their creative discipline, but the bulk of guests comprised illustrators and graphic designers.

Collaborative_doodles_Photo by ShantyUK
Collaborative doodles. Photo by ShantyUK.

Proceedings kicked off at seven in the Museum’s lobby, with guests enjoying a free drink courtesy of the only commercial sponsor of the evening. The Design Museum had kept its shop open and a cash bar was operating too. The event was partnered by Moleskine and the LEGO group, and as well as the drink, on arrival each guest received a little CR branded Moleskine sketchbook.

Collaborative doodling
Collaborative doodling.

Activities started with a bit of sketching too. There was a ‘never-ending’ 2 x 8 metre roll of 200gsm sketchpaper covering a large square table that fit about a dozen people around it, and a load of fibre-tipped pens, pencils and charcoal for filling it up with scribble. Several people seemed to spend most of the night immersed in this one activity, but they missed out on the rest of what the museum had to offer. After a couple of drinks, a bit of a chat and a doodle, most went on to explore the rest of the space, arriving first at the impressive BRIT Designs of the Year exhibition, which will soon be coming to an end. As well as featuring some impressive sustainability projects.

Communal LEGO building
Communal LEGO building.

For many, the main event took place on the very top floor of the Museum, in the just opened John Pawson exhibition. This exhibition is one of pristine minimalism, with a beautiful reproduction of a Japanese monastery, a hall-spanning bench made from Douglas fir and a floor embedded with materials product design arranged with as much care and forethought as a feng shui-inspired garden. Very few of the guests would have been able to enjoy this peaceful impression however, as by the time most of the more sociable crowd arrived on the third floor, the space had been taken over by cross-legged adults attempting to build representations of their ideal homes from LEGO.

CR_Lego
A LEGO installation.

When it came to the time for me to announce that LEGO play was almost at an end and the evening’s piece de resistance was about to be unveiled, there were more than several looks of disappointment. Still, everyone got to keep the LEGO that they hadn’t made use of, which was not an inconsiderable amount. The final stage of the evening was an impromptu exhibition put together by Creative Review staff that was comprised of individual pieces of work the guests had brought along with them. Here’s a look at some of the work that was done on the night: with photos taken by various attendees.

Illustration by Jitesh Patel_Photo by ShantyUK
Illustration by Jitesh Patel. Photo by ShantyUK.

All in all most people seemed to get a kick out of the evening, and there’s been plenty of talk at Creative Review about putting on something similar in the future, perhaps looking north though, to Birmingham, Manchester or Scotland. In the meantime you can follow me on twitter @NeilAyres.

Categories ,Creative Review, ,Design Museum, ,Jitesh Patel, ,John Pawson, ,Lego, ,Moleskine, ,Neil Ayres, ,ShantyUK, ,Tweetup, ,twitter

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Amelia’s Magazine | Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration official launch party is TODAY.

anna_calvi_abby_wright

Illustration by Abby Wright

Rider to the sea starts. With slow, decease troche sensuous notes, stuff running then halting. We wait. This is like some sort of Spanish guitar tease; the heroin with eyes masked looks at the man playing the guitar on the balcony of a castle. She jumps higher, viagra sale her cape flowing out behind her. They see each other and the notes build up to a feverish level. Then stop. My breath is involuntarily left held.

Anna Calvi’s voice is pushed, because she pushes it. She said in an interview with BBC 6 Music recently, that her vocal performances are about commitment; “baring the soul when you sing, not be scared, just show emotion. it’s important that, I think.” And when compared to Florence and The Machine, she says they are similar in that: “When we go for it, we really go for it.” She does.

Anna Calvi by Avril Kelly

Illustration by Avril Kelly

Anna credits a wide range of musical influences from Roy Orbison and Elvis to twentieth century music, which she says comes out in her guitar playing. Sometimes she sounds like she should be singing the intro music to a James Bond movie, other times she is a Kate Bush atop a cliff, and then you may get a hint of Adam and The Ants – tribal, wigs and theatre. She certainly has her own sound, and as she says, really unleashes on that mic. You can feel her whole body behind those deep, propelling notes.Visually her red lips, sculpted cheekbones and feline eyes adding to the passion of the adventure.

anna_calvi_abby_wright2

Illustration by Abby Wright

I have to admit that the first listen I had, I was not instantly in love with her. However, I was hosting a knit club at my house at the time. And now I realise, for a first listen, Anna is wrong when (perhaps…) extra strong girly vibes are circulating. She is a powerful woman, with no messing or moaning. She is vibrant and direct, not fluffy kitten cute. She has said herself, she is in the business, because she loves it, for her, it is not about being ‘careerist’. Maybe this has made her less fearful and safe, as she is only riding on her own expectations, of which she is willing to push. Thus, I listened to the album a few days later when the moon was full and I was feeling a bit more lioness like, and blimey. It was on all morning and beyond. Together with a coffee, I was screaming from my basement flat. Such a shame I have no rooftops.

Anna-Calvi-by-Mina-Bach

Illustration by Mina Bach

Listen to this and you will see exactly what I mean:

So track highlights; No More Words’ guitar notes are so sweet, with Anna’s voice ‘ahhhing’ over the top and singing so close to the microphone. Desire is as you would hope, with the title it holds; “The sound of love is beating like a fevered heart… It’s heavenly, heavenly, desirrrre.” Yes to desires, passions and DRUMS! In contrast First We Kiss, is the lingering and submission of desire and the story from the kiss to beyond. Whilst Blackout is a scaling, swinging, red hot infused, deep breathing track. Then… we have Morning Light, all strung out notes, infused by the morning’s spreading sun. New starts and consequences. A fabulous, long, slightly hazy, almost mumbly track, climaxing with symbols and the full sunrise. It reflects perfectly the morning’s feeling, you feel like you have so much time before the sun rises, but it’s always over quicker than you anticipate. You are not invincible, and the day is beginning.

anna calvi 2 by Avril kelly

Illustration by Avril Kelly

My i tunes says she’s ‘Latin’, but she seems to cover more genres. She has the passions of the Latino, but Anna is also rockier, showier and yet almost primmer than Latin. It’s liberating music, but also feels quite private. A bit like being within the bubble of thoughts consuming a girl in the throes of deep lust, she is singing literally from within. With her Italian blood running through her veins, Anna says this album is about: “intimacy, passion and loneliness.” Strong and all encompassing emotions, that supports both her commitment to performance and the deep, trusted position we are in, as listeners. And you really do believe her feelings as you listen to her.

You know at the end of some of those 80s films, when the couple that have spent the whole movie arguing and bouncing around in bed, get in the car and drive off around a cliff in a sports car that looks like an insect? She would be an AMAZING soundtrack to a modern version of that.

Anna Calvi‘s Album is Out Now on Domino Records
anna_calvi_abby_wright

Illustration by Abby Wright

Rider to the sea starts. With slow, viagra buy sensuous notes, doctor running then halting. We wait. This is like some sort of Spanish guitar tease; the heroin with eyes masked looks at the man playing the guitar on the balcony of a castle. She jumps higher, her cape flowing out behind her. They see each other and the notes build up to a feverish level. Then stop. My breath is involuntarily left held.

Anna Calvi’s voice is pushed, because she pushes it. She said in an interview with BBC 6 Music recently, that her vocal performances are about commitment; “baring the soul when you sing, not be scared, just show emotion. it’s important that, I think.” And when compared to Florence and The Machine, she says they are similar in that: “When we go for it, we really go for it.” She does.

Anna Calvi by Avril Kelly

Illustration by Avril Kelly

Anna credits a wide range of musical influences from Roy Orbison and Elvis to twentieth century music, which she says comes out in her guitar playing. Sometimes she sounds like she should be singing the intro music to a James Bond movie, other times she is a Kate Bush atop a cliff, and then you may get a hint of Adam and The Ants – tribal, wigs and theatre. She certainly has her own sound, and as she says, really unleashes on that mic. You can feel her whole body behind those deep, propelling notes. Visually, her red lips, sculpted cheekbones and feline eyes add to the womanly, lustful passion of the adventure.

anna_calvi_abby_wright2

Illustration by Abby Wright

I have to admit that the first listen I had, I was not instantly in love with her. However, I was hosting a knit club at my house at the time. And now I realise, for a first listen, Anna is wrong when (perhaps…) extra strong girly vibes are circulating. She is a powerful woman, with no messing or moaning. She is vibrant and direct, not fluffy kitten cute. She has said herself, she is in the business, because she loves it, for her, it is not about being ‘careerist’. Maybe this has made her less fearful and safe, as she is only riding on her own expectations, of which she is willing to push. Thus, I listened to the album a few days later when the moon was full and I was feeling a bit more lioness like, and blimey. It was on all morning and beyond. Together with a coffee, I was screaming from my basement flat. Such a shame I have no rooftops.

Anna-Calvi-by-Mina-Bach

Illustration by Mina Bach

Listen to this and you will see exactly what I mean:

So track highlights; No More Words’ guitar notes are so sweet, with Anna’s voice ‘ahhhing’ over the top and singing so close to the microphone. Desire is as you would hope, with the title it holds; “The sound of love is beating like a fevered heart… It’s heavenly, heavenly, desirrrre.” Yes to desires, passions and DRUMS! In contrast First We Kiss, is the lingering and submission of desire and the story from the kiss to beyond. Whilst Blackout is a scaling, swinging, red hot infused, deep breathing track. Then… we have Morning Light, all strung out notes, infused by the morning’s spreading sun. New starts and consequences. A fabulous, long, slightly hazy, almost mumbly track, climaxing with symbols and the full sunrise. It reflects perfectly the morning’s feeling, you feel like you have so much time before the sun rises, but it’s always over quicker than you anticipate. You are not invincible, and the day is beginning.

anna calvi 2 by Avril kelly

Illustration by Avril Kelly

My i tunes says she’s ‘Latin’, but she seems to cover more genres. She has the passions of the Latino, but Anna is also rockier, showier and yet almost primmer than Latin. It’s liberating music, but also feels quite private. A bit like being within the bubble of thoughts consuming a girl in the throes of deep lust, she is singing literally from within. With her Italian blood running through her veins, Anna says this album is about: “intimacy, passion and loneliness.” Strong and all encompassing emotions, that supports both her commitment to performance and the deep, trusted position we are in, as listeners. And you really do believe her feelings as you listen to her.

You know at the end of some of those 80s films, when the couple that have spent the whole movie arguing and bouncing around in bed, get in the car and drive off around a cliff in a sports car that looks like an insect? She would be an AMAZING soundtrack to a modern version of that.

Anna Calvi‘s Album is Out Now on Domino Records
anna_calvi_abby_wright

Illustration by Abby Wright

Rider to the sea starts. With slow, cure sensuous notes, information pills running then halting. We wait. This is like some sort of Spanish guitar tease; the heroin with eyes masked looks at the man playing the guitar on the balcony of a castle. She jumps higher, her cape flowing out behind her. They see each other and the notes build up to a feverish level. Then stop. My breath is involuntarily left held.

Anna Calvi’s voice is pushed, because she pushes it. She said in an interview with BBC 6 Music recently, that her vocal performances are about commitment; “baring the soul when you sing, not be scared, just show emotion. it’s important that, I think.” And when compared to Florence and The Machine, she says they are similar in that: “When we go for it, we really go for it.” She does.

Anna Calvi by Avril Kelly

Illustration by Avril Kelly

Anna credits a wide range of musical influences from Roy Orbison and Elvis to twentieth century music, which she says comes out in her guitar playing. Sometimes she sounds like she should be singing the intro music to a James Bond movie, other times she is a Kate Bush atop a cliff, and then you may get a hint of Adam and The Ants – tribal, wigs and theatre. She certainly has her own sound, and as she says, really unleashes on that mic. You can feel her whole body behind those deep, propelling notes. Visually, her red lips, sculpted cheekbones and feline eyes add to the womanly, lustful passion of the adventure.

anna_calvi_abby_wright2

Illustration by Abby Wright

I have to admit that the first listen I had, I was not instantly in love with her. However, I was hosting a knit club at my house at the time. And now I realise, for a first listen, Anna is wrong when (perhaps…) extra strong girly vibes are circulating. She is a powerful woman, with no messing or moaning. She is vibrant and direct, not fluffy kitten cute. She has said herself, she is in the business because she loves it. For her, it is not about being ‘careerist’. Maybe this has made her less fearful and safe. She is riding on her own expectations, of which she is willing to push. Thus, I listened to the album a few days later when the moon was full and I was feeling a bit more lioness like, and blimey. It was on all morning and beyond. Together with a coffee, I was screaming from my basement flat. Such a shame I have no rooftops.

Anna-Calvi-by-Mina-Bach

Illustration by Mina Bach

Listen to this and you will see exactly what I mean:

So track highlights; No More Words’ guitar notes are so sweet, with Anna’s voice ‘ahhhing’ over the top and singing so close to the microphone. Desire is as you would hope, with the title it holds; “The sound of love is beating like a fevered heart… It’s heavenly, heavenly, desirrrre.” Yes to desires, passions and DRUMS! In contrast First We Kiss, is the lingering and submission of desire and the story from the kiss to beyond. Whilst Blackout is a scaling, swinging, red hot infused, deep breathing track. Then… we have Morning Light, all strung out notes, infused by the morning’s spreading sun. New starts and consequences. A fabulous, long, slightly hazy, almost mumbly track, climaxing with symbols and the full sunrise. It reflects perfectly the morning’s feeling, you feel like you have so much time before the sun rises, but it’s always over quicker than you anticipate. You are not invincible, and the day is beginning.

anna calvi 2 by Avril kelly

Illustration by Avril Kelly

My iTunes says she’s ‘Latin’, but she seems to cover more genres. She has the passions of the Latino, but Anna is also rockier, showier and yet almost primmer than Latin. It’s liberating music, but also feels quite private. A bit like being within the bubble of thoughts consuming a girl in the throes of deep lust, she is singing literally from within. With her Italian blood running through her veins, Anna says this album is about: “intimacy, passion and loneliness.” Strong and all encompassing emotions, that supports both her commitment to performance and the deep, trusted position we are in, as listeners. And you really do believe her feelings as you listen to her.

You know at the end of some of those 80s films, when the couple that have spent the whole movie arguing and bouncing around in bed, get in the car and drive off around a cliff in a sports car that looks like an insect? She would be an AMAZING soundtrack to a modern version of that.

Anna Calvi‘s Album is Out Now on Domino Records
anna_calvi_abby_wright

Illustration by Abby Wright

Rider to the sea starts. With slow, treat sensuous notes, information pills running then halting. We wait. This is like some sort of Spanish guitar tease; the heroin with eyes masked looks at the man playing the guitar on the balcony of a castle. She jumps higher, her cape flowing out behind her. They see each other and the notes build up to a feverish level. Then stop. My breath is involuntarily left held.

Anna Calvi’s voice is pushed, because she pushes it. She said in an interview with BBC 6 Music recently, that her vocal performances are about commitment; “baring the soul when you sing, not be scared, just show emotion. it’s important that, I think.” And when compared to Florence and The Machine, she says they are similar in that: “When we go for it, we really go for it.” She does.

Anna Calvi by Avril Kelly

Illustration by Avril Kelly

Anna credits a wide range of musical influences from Roy Orbison and Elvis to twentieth century music, which she says comes out in her guitar playing. Sometimes she sounds like she should be singing the intro music to a James Bond movie, other times she is a Kate Bush atop a cliff, and then you may get a hint of Adam and The Ants – tribal, wigs and theatre. She certainly has her own sound, and as she says, really unleashes on that mic. You can feel her whole body behind those deep, propelling notes. Visually, her red lips, sculpted cheekbones and feline eyes add to the womanly, lustful passion of the adventure.

anna_calvi_abby_wright2

Illustration by Abby Wright

I have to admit that the first listen I had, I was not instantly in love with her. However, I was hosting a knit club at my house at the time. And now I realise, for a first listen, Anna is wrong when (perhaps…) extra strong girly vibes are circulating. She is a powerful woman, with no messing or moaning. She is vibrant and direct, not fluffy kitten cute. She has said herself, she is in the business because she loves it. For her, it is not about being ‘careerist’. Maybe this has made her less fearful and safe. She is riding on her own expectations, of which she is willing to push. Thus, I listened to the album a few days later when the moon was full and I was feeling a bit more lioness like, and blimey. It was on all morning and beyond. Together with a coffee, I was screaming from my basement flat. Such a shame I have no rooftops.

Anna-Calvi-by-Mina-Bach

Illustration by Mina Bach

Listen to this and you will see exactly what I mean:

So track highlights; No More Words’ guitar notes are so sweet, with Anna’s voice ‘ahhhing’ over the top and singing so close to the microphone. Desire is as you would hope, with the title it holds; “The sound of love is beating like a fevered heart… It’s heavenly, heavenly, desirrrre.” Yes to desires, passions and DRUMS! In contrast First We Kiss, is the lingering and submission of desire and the story from the kiss to beyond. Whilst Blackout is a scaling, swinging, red hot infused, deep breathing track. Then… we have Morning Light, all strung out notes, infused by the morning’s spreading sun. New starts and consequences. A fabulous, long, slightly hazy, almost mumbly track, climaxing with symbols and the full sunrise. It reflects perfectly the morning’s feeling, you feel like you have so much time before the sun rises, but it’s always over quicker than you anticipate. You are not invincible, and the day is beginning.

anna calvi 2 by Avril kelly

Illustration by Avril Kelly

My iTunes says she’s ‘Latin’, but she seems to cover more genres. She has the passions of the Latino, but Anna is also rockier, showier and yet almost primmer than Latin. It’s liberating music, but also feels quite private. A bit like being within the bubble of thoughts consuming a girl in the throes of deep lust, she is singing literally from within. With her Italian blood running through her veins, Anna says this album is about: “intimacy, passion and loneliness.” Strong and all encompassing emotions, that supports both her commitment to performance and the deep, trusted position we are in, as listeners. And you really do believe her feelings as you listen to her.

You know at the end of some of those 80s films, when the couple that have spent the whole movie arguing and bouncing around in bed, get in the car and drive off around a cliff in a sports car that looks like an insect? She would be an AMAZING soundtrack to a modern version of that.

Anna Calvi‘s Album is Out Now on Domino Records
anna_calvi_abby_wright

Illustration by Abby Wright

Rider to the sea starts. With slow, approved sensuous notes, running then halting. We wait. This is like some sort of Spanish guitar tease; the heroin with eyes masked looks at the man playing the guitar on the balcony of a castle. She jumps higher, her cape flowing out behind her. They see each other and the notes build up to a feverish level. Then stop. My breath is involuntarily left held.

Anna Calvi’s voice is pushed, because she pushes it. She said in an interview with BBC 6 Music recently, that her vocal performances are about commitment; “baring the soul when you sing, not be scared, just show emotion. it’s important that, I think.” And when compared to Florence and The Machine, she says they are similar in that: “When we go for it, we really go for it.” She does.

Anna Calvi by Avril Kelly

Illustration by Avril Kelly

Anna credits a wide range of musical influences from Roy Orbison and Elvis to twentieth century music, which she says comes out in her guitar playing. Sometimes she sounds like she should be singing the intro music to a James Bond movie, other times she is a Kate Bush atop a cliff, and then you may get a hint of Adam and The Ants – tribal, wigs and theatre. She certainly has her own sound, and as she says, really unleashes on that mic. You can feel her whole body behind those deep, propelling notes. Visually, her red lips, sculpted cheekbones and feline eyes add to the womanly, lustful passion of the adventure.

anna_calvi_abby_wright2

Illustration by Abby Wright

I have to admit that the first listen I had, I was not instantly in love with her. However, I was hosting a knit club at my house at the time. And now I realise, for a first listen, Anna is wrong when (perhaps…) extra strong girly vibes are circulating. She is a powerful woman, with no messing or moaning. She is vibrant and direct, not fluffy kitten cute. She has said herself, she is in the business because she loves it. For her, it is not about being ‘careerist’. Maybe this has made her less fearful and safe. She is riding on her own expectations, of which she is willing to push. Thus, I listened to the album a few days later when the moon was full and I was feeling a bit more lioness like, and blimey. It was on all morning and beyond. Together with a coffee, I was screaming from my basement flat. Such a shame I have no rooftops.

Anna-Calvi-by-Mina-Bach

Illustration by Mina Bach

Listen to this and you will see exactly what I mean:

So track highlights; No More Words’ guitar notes are so sweet, with Anna’s voice ‘ahhhing’ over the top and singing so close to the microphone. Desire is as you would hope, with the title it holds; “The sound of love is beating like a fevered heart… It’s heavenly, heavenly, desirrrre.” Yes to desires, passions and DRUMS! In contrast First We Kiss, is the lingering and submission of desire and the story from the kiss to beyond. Whilst Blackout is a scaling, swinging, red hot infused, deep breathing track. Then… we have Morning Light, all strung out notes, infused by the morning’s spreading sun. New starts and consequences. A fabulous, long, slightly hazy, almost mumbly track, climaxing with symbols and the full sunrise. It reflects perfectly the morning’s feeling, you feel like you have so much time before the sun rises, but it’s always over quicker than you anticipate. You are not invincible, and the day is beginning.

anna calvi 2 by Avril kelly

Illustration by Avril Kelly

My iTunes says she’s ‘Latin’, but she seems to cover more genres. She has the passions of the Latino, but Anna is also rockier, showier and yet almost primmer than Latin. It’s liberating music, but also feels quite private. A bit like being within the bubble of thoughts consuming a girl in the throes of deep lust, she is singing literally from within. With her Italian blood running through her veins, Anna says this album is about: “intimacy, passion and loneliness.” Strong and all encompassing emotions, that supports both her commitment to performance and the deep, trusted position we are in, as listeners. And you really do believe her feelings as you listen to her.

You know at the end of some of those 80s films, when the couple that have spent the whole movie arguing and bouncing around in bed, get in the car and drive off around a cliff in a sports car that looks like an insect? She would be an AMAZING soundtrack to a modern version of that.

Anna Calvi‘s Album is Out Now on Domino Records
anna_calvi_abby_wright

Illustration by Abby Wright

Rider to the sea starts. With slow, drug sensuous notes, running then halting. We wait. This is like some sort of Spanish guitar tease; the heroin with eyes masked looks at the man playing the guitar on the balcony of a castle. She jumps higher, her cape flowing out behind her. They see each other and the notes build up to a feverish level. Then stop. My breath is involuntarily left held.

Anna Calvi’s voice is pushed, because she pushes it. She said in an interview with BBC 6 Music recently, that her vocal performances are about commitment; “baring the soul when you sing, not be scared, just show emotion. it’s important that, I think.” And when compared to Florence and The Machine, she says they are similar in that: “When we go for it, we really go for it.” She does.

Anna Calvi by Avril Kelly

Illustration by Avril Kelly

Anna credits a wide range of musical influences from Roy Orbison and Elvis to twentieth century music, which she says comes out in her guitar playing. Sometimes she sounds like she should be singing the intro music to a James Bond movie, other times she is a Kate Bush atop a cliff, and then you may get a hint of Adam and The Ants – tribal, wigs and theatre. She certainly has her own sound, and as she says, really unleashes on that mic. You can feel her whole body behind those deep, propelling notes. Visually, her red lips, sculpted cheekbones and feline eyes add to the womanly, lustful passion of the adventure.

anna_calvi_abby_wright2

Illustration by Abby Wright

I have to admit that the first listen I had, I was not instantly in love with her. However, I was hosting a knit club at my house at the time. And now I realise, for a first listen, Anna is wrong when (perhaps…) extra strong girly vibes are circulating. She is a powerful woman, with no messing or moaning. She is vibrant and direct, not fluffy kitten cute. She has said herself, she is in the business because she loves it. For her, it is not about being ‘careerist’. Maybe this has made her less fearful and safe. She is riding on her own expectations, of which she is willing to push. Thus, I listened to the album a few days later when the moon was full and I was feeling a bit more lioness like, and blimey. It was on all morning and beyond. Together with a coffee, I was screaming from my basement flat. Such a shame I have no rooftops.

Anna-Calvi-by-Mina-Bach

Illustration by Mina Bach

Listen to this and you will see exactly what I mean:

So track highlights; No More Words’ guitar notes are so sweet, with Anna’s voice ‘ahhhing’ over the top and singing so close to the microphone. Desire is as you would hope, with the title it holds; “The sound of love is beating like a fevered heart… It’s heavenly, heavenly, desirrrre.” Yes to desires, passions and DRUMS! In contrast First We Kiss, is the lingering and submission of desire and the story from the kiss to beyond. Whilst Blackout is a scaling, swinging, red hot infused, deep breathing track. Then… we have Morning Light, all strung out notes, infused by the morning’s spreading sun. New starts and consequences. A fabulous, long, slightly hazy, almost mumbly track, climaxing with symbols and the full sunrise. It reflects perfectly the morning’s feeling, you feel like you have so much time before the sun rises, but it’s always over quicker than you anticipate. You are not invincible, and the day is beginning.

anna calvi 2 by Avril kelly

Illustration by Avril Kelly

My iTunes says she’s ‘Latin’, but she seems to cover more genres. She has the passions of the Latino, but Anna is also rockier, showier and yet almost primmer than Latin. It’s liberating music, but also feels quite private. A bit like being within the bubble of thoughts consuming a girl in the throes of deep lust, she is singing literally from within. With her Italian blood running through her veins, Anna says this album is about: “intimacy, passion and loneliness.” Strong and all encompassing emotions, that supports both her commitment to performance and the deep, trusted position we are in, as listeners. And you really do believe her feelings as you listen to her.

You know at the end of some of those 80s films, when the couple that have spent the whole movie arguing and bouncing around in bed, get in the car and drive off around a cliff in a sports car that looks like an insect? She would be an AMAZING soundtrack to a modern version of that.

Anna Calvi‘s Album is Out Now on Domino Records
ACOFI launch party invite for Friday 28th January 2011
ACOFI launch party invite for Friday 28th January 2011.

Well, capsule dear readers, link today is finally the official launch day of Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, which you have no doubt seen me banging on about on Facebook and Twitter for months now, especially under the hashtag #ACOFI (it’s an abbreviation, geddit, for which I have illustrator Antonia Parker to thank). The book has been in shops since late December, but the party will bring together almost all of the featured illustrators, many of the featured ethical fashion designers, and some of the best journalistic and blogging talent under one wonderful roof: that of 123 Bethnal Green Road, an eco fashion store that is profiled in the book.

Harriet of Tatty Devine
Harriet of Tatty Devine.

During the afternoon I shall be hosting a Pukka herbal tea party for VIP guests in the new Bunker Cafe. We’re going to have a giant ACOFI inspired centre piece and lots of delightful scones and biscuits to accompany it, all baked by the fabulous Lily Vanilli, baker extraordinaire… better still Lily promises me there won’t be a cupcake in sight.

Junky Styling ACOFI in the shop
Annika of Junky Styling
Annika of Junky Styling.

Afternoon guests will be invited to sit for their very own fashion illustration with one of my crack team of illustrators, all of whom who are featured in the book. They will also be able to view my online Skype videos with all the featured illustrators, which just today have gone live on my Amelia’s House youtube channel (go check it), perhaps whilst having a soothing hand massage from lovely ethical skincare brand Dr.Hauschka.

123 ACOFI gifts
Reclaimed leather key rings made using fobs found in the shop that now houses 123. A wee gift for party-goers.

On the second floor of 123 they will be able to take a look through a selection of the featured ethical designers, who are taking part in a two week Eco Pop Up shop which will be instore until the 13th February. Make sure you get down and take a look – there’s a whole host of talent in there, and if you haven’t already visited 123 this would be the perfect opportunity.

Beautiful Soul
A blurry pic of me trying on my Beautiful Soul shrug. I will try to look more elegant in it today…

The utterly brilliant Courtney at Forward PR is looking after my PR for today so it looks like I’m going to be busy with interviews almost all afternoon… look out for more in depth coverage in the coming weeks on lots of other websites and blogs. Come 7pm the party proper begins in the newly converted Scout Hut, kicking off with a live gig from Amelia’s Magazine favourite 6 Day Riot, fronted by the glamourous Tamara Schlesinger. We’ll be drinking lovely Spindrift and carbon neutral East Green beers from my favourite beer company, Adnams, alongside Vodka O, a pure Australian spirit.

Nicola of Beautiful Soul with ACOFI
Nicola of Beautiful Soul with ACOFI.

I’m then planning to cut the big Lily Vanilli cake and hand it out in a gloriously sticky manner, hopefully in a way that isn’t too reminiscent of a five year old’s birthday or a wedding with no groom.

Nina Dolcetti shoes
I’m going to be wearing these fabulous Nina Dolcetti shoes.

From there on in it’s going to be a big old dance party once The Pipettes hit the decks…. followed later in the evening by my TOP SECRET special DJ… who I will now reveal is none other than Will of the Mystery Jets… it’s going to be a good one.

ACOFI in the Tate Modern
ACOFI in the Tate Modern.

And of course there will be lots of copies of ACOFI around to browse through… and possibly the most fantastic goodie bag EVER to accompany all purchases of the book on the night, containing gifts created exclusively for the occasion from Tatty Devine, Moleskine, Dr.Hauschka, 123 Bethnal Green Road and Pukka Teas – all presented in a specially designed #ACOFI bespoke tote bag. It don’t get better than that.

ACOFI moleskine
My special bespoke ACOFI Moleskine, with a holographic imprint of the logo on the front cover.

Dr.Hauschka goodie bags at The First To Know launch party
Dr.Hauschka goodie bags at The First To Know launch party for Lida Hujic’s new book earlier this week: I haven’t unpacked/packed our goodie bags yet.

So that’s the plan. But it will all probably be fabulously disorganised mayhem. Make sure you bring your camera if you’re coming! And I feel I should state apologies at this point that this party is invite only… but there just isn’t enough room (or drink, or cake) to accommodate any more people. It’s principally a party to promote the book, so I’ve invited the illustrators and fashion designers who features in it, and lots of bloggers and journalists.

ACOFI tote bag
All packed in the lovely limited edition ACOFI tote bag, designed to complement the cover by Andrea Peterson.

In the meantime go check out my Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration Skype interviews with the 30 very talented featured illustrators, uploaded NOW on my Amelia’s House youtube channel. And don’t forget to check on the #ACOFI hashtag for updates, or take a look at my very own #ACOFI hash album.

And please go buy the book… cos the future of this website kind of depends on it… For a sneaky 10% off use the discount code ACOFI LAUNCH – vald for one month only until the 28th February 2011 (coincidentally my birthday… just thought I’d drop that in)

Right, I’m off to get my hair blow-dryed by Shine on the Green… I hope they will be able to tame it into something suitably sophisticated. See you on the other side…

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