Amelia’s Magazine | New Designers 2015: The Best Jewellery Design Graduates

New Designers Melissa Martinson 2
New Designers Melissa Martinson
New Designers part one is a jewellery lover’s paradise. First up this fabulous embroidered jewellery by Melissa Martinson of Huddersfield Uni, who has worked with AIDS sufferers in Africa using local techniques to create something wonderful. All the pieces are checked for quality and the workers paid a fair wage. I love the colours and shapes of these statement necklaces!

New Designers Natalie Adams
This amazing perspex and woven necklace is by Natalie Adams.

New Designers Maisie Welch
Maisie Welch played with resin shapes at Edinburgh College of Art.

ND Emily Gore
Emily Gore made this extravagant affair.

ND Karolina Baines
Karolina Baines used circular shapes to create this unusual neckpiece.

New Designers jade Stimpson
This organic jewellery by Jade Stimpson at Hereford College of the Arts uses unusual materials such as bone.

New Designers Chesca Dowthwaite
Chesca Dowthwaite created bold silver rings with deep bowls.

New Designers Amelia Hales
Lasercut jewellery by Amelia Hales at Nottingham Trent Uni was ‘inspired by china, made in the U.K.’

New Designers Katie whittaker 2
New Designers Katie whittakerNew Designers Katie whittaker
I absolutely loved this multi media jewellery by Katie Whittaker at Bath School of Art and Design.

New Designers Venice AW
Birmingham City Uni always turns out a selection of brilliant fine jewellery designers: and it is clearly a popular destination for Chinese students wishing to make the most of the burgeoning luxury market at home. This stunning gold necklace is by Venice AW.

New Designers Vanessa Zou
Jewellery by Vanessa Zou takes a more abstract turn.

New Designers Jing Jocelyn He
As does this Blooming collection by Jing Jocelyn He.

New Designers Rachel Codd
New Designers Rachel Codd 2
Ceramic jewellery by Rachel Codd at Cardiff Met is a successful marriage of the beautiful and the surreal. And she was also selling small pendant versions on her stand (available on etsy here), a clever business-savvy move.

New Designers Naoise Fitzgerald
These bright brooches are by Naoise Fitzgerald at the Dublin National College of Art and Design.

New Designers Senak
Resin pendants by Senak at UCA Rochester make a fun statement.

New Designers mary temilola
Mary Temilola made architectural enamelled necklace designs.

New Designers Sinead Toner
I loved the work of Glasgow College of Art students. This is sweetness made bold by Sinead Toner.

New Designers Maisie ford
And a brilliant use of variegated materials by Maisie Ford.

New Designers Maliha Khan
These chunky rings are by Maliha Khan.

ND CHECKIE IEONG
Checkie Ieong showcased delicate and unusual jewellery.

ND Ieva Mikitaite
Ieva Mikitaite was a precious metal award winner for her delicate expanding jewellery. Very clever!

New designers Rachel Blair
Textural jewellery by Rachel Blair featured strange organic shapes.

New designers Chloe Michell
Enamel silver bowls by Chloe Michell at Plymouth University were part of a very strong collection.

ND Megan Maggie Gray
Over at Duncan of Jordanstone I liked these very wearable but unusual rings and earrings by Megan Gray.

New Designers Dione Bowlt
New Designers Dione Bowlt
Clever gold dipped porcelain earrings by Dione Boult are a great way to hang statement jewels without too much pressure on the ear!

ND Leah Orford
It turns out there were a couple of great designers I missed out on with my first review of the Middlesex University jewellery graduate show. Leah Orford makes jewellery that could double as sculpture.

ND Aelita Pluiskyte
Aelita Pluiskyte created an eye-catching display with her silicone necklaces.

ND Elizabeth Gray jewellery
This Elizabeth Gray necklace was inspired by crystals and microscopic sections.

ND nichakan jewellery
Organic shapes are the inspiration behind Nichakan jewellery.

ND kiki tang
At The Cass I liked floral enamel twig earrings by Kiki Tang.

ND Lynn Tunney
And lastly these playful necklaces are by Lynn Tunney.

All of these images first appeared on the New Designers instagram feed (they very kindly asked me to guest post a favourite selection from both part one and part two of the show) or on my own my instagram feed: follow me there to catch my discoveries as I make them!

Categories ,2015, ,Aelita Pluiskyte, ,Amelia Hales, ,Bath School of Art and Design, ,Birmingham City Uni, ,Blooming, ,Cardiff Met, ,Checkie Ieong, ,Chesca Dowthwaite, ,Chloe Michell, ,Dione Boult, ,Duncan of Jordanstone, ,Edinburgh College of Art, ,Elizabeth Gray, ,Emily Gore, ,Glasgow College of Art, ,Hereford College of the Arts, ,Huddersfield Uni, ,Ieva Mikitaite, ,Jade Stimpson, ,jewellery, ,Jing Jocelyn He, ,Karolina Baines, ,Katie Whittaker, ,Kiki Tang, ,Leah Orford, ,Lynn Tunney, ,Maisie Ford, ,Maisie Welch, ,Maliha Khan, ,Mary Temilola, ,Megan Gray, ,Melissa Martinson, ,middlesex university, ,Naoise Fitzgerald, ,Natalie Adams, ,National College of Art and Design, ,New Designers, ,Nichakan, ,Nichakan Jewellery, ,Nottingham Trent Uni, ,Plymouth University, ,Rachel Blair, ,Rachel Codd, ,review, ,Senak, ,Sinead Toner, ,The Cass, ,UCA Rochester, ,Vanessa Zou, ,Venice AW

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Amelia’s Magazine | Middlesex University: Ba Hons Fashion Design, Styling and Promotion Graduate Show 2011 Review

Middlesex graduate show 2011-Fashion Strikes Back by Sufiyeh Hadian
Fashion Strikes Back by Sufiyeh Hadian.

I was a little unclear whether Fashion Design, buy Styling and Promotion that I saw on display were all part of the same course as I whipped through the upper halls of Free Range, web but I’ve decided to cover them in one blog nonetheless.

Middlesex graduate show 2011-Rosie Thompson-Agnew's At Your Disposal
I liked Rosie Thompson-Agnew‘s At Your Disposal, which featured brightly screen-printed luxury consumer goods. I guess this is a commentary on rampant consumerism – always an intriguing thing to tackle as someone studying fashion promotion.

Middlesex graduate show 2011-Fashion Strikes Back by Sufiyeh Hadian C-3POMiddlesex graduate show 2011-Fashion Strikes Back by Sufiyeh Hadian Darth Vadar
At the other end of the spectrum Sufiyeh Hadian had spray painted and encrusted some familiar Star Wars characters. I have no idea what it all means but I was most amused by these models of Darth Vadar and C-3PO. Fashion Strikes Back indeed.

From the fashion design on display the work of these three caught my eye:

Middlesex graduate show 2011-Elina Mourmouris
Elina Mourmouris has created lovely wide shapes for shoulders and legs combined with bright splash prints.

Middlesex graduate show 2011-Abigail Lee
Abigail Lee has also gone for the baggy look but in splodgy monochrome

Middlesex graduate show 2011 Michaela Phillips
Michaela Phillips did wide sleeves and splashy green with black and greys on a very appealing dress

Middlesex graduate show 2011-Louise Johnson
Louise Johnson opted for a spotty approach in oversized shirt form.

But. Not one website between them. Gah. I hope to do a bit of teaching at Middlesex University next year so here’s hoping I get a chance to talk a bit about the importance of an online presence. I have a feeling that I am going to be writing about this a lot when reviewing the graduate shows this year. Again.

Categories ,Abigail Lee, ,At Your Disposal, ,C-3PO, ,Darth Vadar, ,Elina Mourmouris, ,Fashion Design, ,Fashion Strikes Back, ,Free Range, ,Free Range Art and Design Show, ,Louise Johnson, ,Michaela Phillips, ,middlesex university, ,Rosie Thompson-Agnew, ,Star Wars, ,Styling and Promotion, ,Sufiyeh Hadian

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Amelia’s Magazine | Middlesex University Graduate Fashion Designers 2013: Preview Part One

Annest Gwynedd ethical_menswear-by_gaarte
Annest Gwynedd by Gaarte.

Last week fashion students at Middlesex University held their 2013 internal fashion show, featuring work from over 100 graduating students. Some of them were then chosen by fashion world luminaries (including Louise Gray and James Long) to showcase full collections on the catwalk during Graduate Fashion Week this June: an exciting event to look forward to. Due to a mix up in timings I sadly missed the collections from the first 25 students to show: but here’s the best of those I did see, all of them possible stars of tomorrow. What a wonderful diversity of work on show!

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Annest Gwynedd
Ethical menswear by Annest Gwynedd hit a contemporary nerve with useful pockets adorning aqua and coral coloured tailored coats, and chunky knitwear details.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Rachel Chapman
Rachel Chapman‘s exotic urban look saw men sporting neon wristband ruffs, appliquéd 3D flowers on shirts and prints inspired by ancient stone carvings on parka coats.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-I.R.Walcott
I.R. Walcott‘s models wore dip-dyed high-tops to match distressed devore garments inspired by the textures of the urban environment.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Anna Giles
I loved the elegant appliqué detailing on sleek dresses by Anna Giles: in this dress the green lobes remind me of a prickly cactus.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Grace Peverall
Grace Peverall went dotty with layered body con dresses that reminiscent of all over body painting by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Marion Doreau
Marion Doreau styled her menswear with some great papermache animal heads which provided a striking focal point on the catwalk.

Kirsty Anderton 2-by_gaarte
Kirsty Anderton by Gaarte
Kirsty Anderton by Gaarte.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013 Kirsty Anderton
I don’t believe there can ever be enough over the top knitwear, and Kirsty Anderton‘s skull shaped knitted dress was a major highlight of the show.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Luke Anthony Rooney
Luke Anthony Rooney successfully mixed wild colours and textures in his sculptural outfits, topped with tiaras.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Abbie Ridler
I loved the simple styling of Abbie Ridler‘s oversized mens’ jumpers, which were resplendent with abstract motifs inspired by African designs.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Sophie Chiesa
Sophie Chiesa by Chetna Shetty
Sophie Chiesa by Chetna Shetty.

Sophie Chiesa by Cathy Hookey
Sophie Chiesa by Cathy Hookey.

Sophie Chiesa‘s discharge printed catsuit was a riot of colour, styled to great effect with over the top hair extensions that would not look out of place on a Barbie doll.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Anita Tetteh
Anita Tetteh‘s tapered powder pink harem pants were worn with cream chiffon and a pencil skirt and scalloped crop top in bold monochrome stripes were a lesson in understated elegance.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Shiri Elmekless
Tailored menswear by Shiri Elmekless featured beautiful oversized shirts with clever layers of folds and beautiful button detailing.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Sylwia Szyplik
Sylwia Szyplik took inspiration from relaxed 80s style in her cream and dove grey collection.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Christia Charalambous
Scalloped sculptural cutaway shapes were combined with geometric triangle detailing and fringed mohair by Christia Charalambous.

Read my next blog to discover the best of the rest. You saw them here first!

Categories ,Abbie Ridler, ,Anita Tetteh, ,Anna Giles, ,Annest Gwynedd, ,Atrium, ,Ba Degree, ,Cathy Hookey, ,Chetna Shetty, ,Christia Charalambous, ,fashion, ,Fashion Textiles, ,Gaarte, ,Grace Peverall, ,graduate, ,Graduate Fashion Week, ,I.R. Walcott, ,James Long, ,Kirsty Anderton, ,Louise Gray, ,Luke Anthony Rooney, ,Marion Doreau, ,middlesex university, ,Rachel Chapman, ,Shiri Elmekless, ,Sophie Chiesa, ,Sylwia Szyplik, ,Yayoi Kusama

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Amelia’s Magazine | Middlesex University Graduate Fashion Designers 2013: Preview Part Two

Sarah Kathryn Grantham by Rebecca May Higgins
Sarah Kathryn Grantham by Rebecca May Higgins.

You’ve met my first pick of the 2013 graduating Middlesex University fashion and fashion textiles students: now meet the rest.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Jiselle Pineda
Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Jiselle Pineda 2
A tailored trio of sleek cream dresses and suiting by Jiselle Pineda featured tie detailing, high collars and a cut out back which made clever use of contrasting black fabric.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Sukpreet Kaur Jugpal
Wanita Panchal presented a brave menswear collection with a patchwork effect created from contrasting textiles on zippered loose coats, worn over drainpipe trousers and accessorised with pointy Arabian style shoes.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Jeyda Yilmaz
Jeyda Yilmaz put a pretty lilac print on a cute flared skater dress with pom-pom heeled shoes.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Jason Patrick Carvalho
Jason Patrick Carvalho presented a sweeping dress with beautiful bold styling: a golden frame and letterbox red gloves.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Sarah Kathryn Grantham
I loved stiff golden frills on ra-ra skirts by Sarah Kathryn Grantham.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Natasha Tandoh
Natasha Tandoh used great accessories to match intriguing prints on peasant inspired garments.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Eva Juhasz
Eva Juhasz mixed outsized mesh and ruffles with fiery print chiffon and woven geometric appliqué.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Kirin Atwal
Kirin Atwal‘s mainly cream collection featured panels of a striped burnt orange and black fabric that was also used in oversized holdall bags in this very professional and well styled collection.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Eliot Moran
Outsize roped knitwear by Eliot Moran was accessorised with hard knitted helmets to present an intriguing silhouette.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Charlotte Stewart
I loved the way that Charlotte Stewart matched neon tartan checks with black fabric and chunky lace up shoes: late 80s style made modern once more.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Charlotte Jones
A delicate rope work motif took centre stage in designs by Charlotte Jones.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Lisa George
Intricate pleating by Lisa George was formed into an amazing rippled all-in-one jumpsuit.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Karolina Formici
An elegant swing trench coat with tie fronted waist by Karolina Formici was worn with brogues and a stunning double rope necklace.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Ange Syret
Ange Syret presented avante grade clashing printed menswear – with tasselled headgear to match fringing on the garments.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Laurence Wright
Finally, it looked as if a car crash had inspired Laurence Wright to create a clever collection which made light of injuries: wounds reinterpreted as decorative detail and accessorised with bandaged heads.

Laurence Wright by Cathy Hookey
Laurence Wright by Cathy Hookey.

I look forward to seeing what the chosen designers create for the big catwalk show at the Truman Brewery during Graduate Fashion Week in June.

Categories ,Ange Syret, ,Atrium, ,Ba degree show, ,Cathy Hookey, ,Charlotte Jones, ,Charlotte Stewart, ,Eliot Moran, ,Eva Juhasz, ,fashion, ,Fashion Textiles, ,Graduate Fashion Week, ,Graduate Show, ,Jason Patrick Carvalho, ,Jeyda Yilmaz, ,Jiselle Pineda, ,Karolina Formici, ,Kirin Atwal, ,Laurence Wright, ,Lisa George, ,middlesex university, ,Natasha Tandoh, ,Rebecca Higgins, ,Rebecca May Higgins, ,review, ,Sarah Kathryn Grantham, ,Truman Brewery, ,Wanita Panchal

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Amelia’s Magazine | Free Range Art & Design Show 2013: Middlesex University Jewellery Review

repurposed coloured pencils by Katrine Standahl
I was gutted to discover that the Middlesex University Jewellery degree course will close down when the current first years have passed through the system, for I always look forward to reviewing this show. No other jewellery degree showcases the same level of inventiveness and skills, so it’s no wonder that Middlesex graduates permeate the whole of the UK craft industry. This year the students displayed their wares under bright spot lighting on unforgiving scaffolding sets, but I did my best to take flattering photos. Here are my favourites from the Un-Earthed show.

Free Range shows 2013-katrine standahl
These rings and bracelet by Katrine Standahl are made out of repurposed coloured pencils. She works by bonding together different materials such as wood, cork and metals, then segmenting the results into different pieces which the viewer is encouraged to visualise in their original form.

Crochet & recycled plastic necklaces by Kirke Raava
Crochet & recycled plastic kitchen utensil necklaces by Kirke Raava were inspired by her childhood in Estonia, and in particular her memories of traditional crochet, macrame and knit.

Like a curious jellyfish- knitted elastic & porcelain jewellery by Sabina Johal
This knitted elastic and porcelain piece by Sabina Johal reminds me of a curious jellyfish. She has a particular interest in using unconventional materials in jewellery and her work is inspired by a fascination with tribal jewellery and medical supports such as bandages and splints.

ellie lee
Finger porcelain jewellery by Ellie Lee was showcased with leather on chains, and inside miniature bowls. Her work toys with an old Chinese tradition that says breaking ceramic is very bad luck: yet to access the personal porcelain body parts the bowls must be broken. Gruesome or cool?

Clever jewellery inspired by the weather from Emma Aitchison
Clever jewellery by Emma Aitchison is designed to interact with the weather, be it sun, wind or rain. The boldness and wearability of this sculptural collection could perhaps be traced back to a placement year when she interned with Scott Wilson, for she she has clearly been influenced by his large and playful dynamic. She then worked with milliner Piers Atkinson, after which she was offered a job making leather and metal work for his collections. Her professional website is well worth a look: Emma Aitchison is definitely a name to watch.

If you are graduating this year don’t forget to check out Amelia’s Award, in collaboration with the Secret Emporium. Enter your details and you could be in with a chance to kick start your creative career by receiving a scholarship worth £495 to sell your wares at Wilderness Festival this summer. Deadline: 2nd July 2013.

Categories ,2013, ,Ellie Lee, ,Emma Aitchison, ,Free Range Shows, ,jewellery, ,Katrine Standahl, ,Kirke Raava, ,middlesex university, ,piers atkinson, ,review, ,Sabina Johal, ,Scott Wilson, ,Un-Earthed

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Amelia’s Magazine | Free Range Art & Design Show 2013: Middlesex University Jewellery Review

repurposed coloured pencils by Katrine Standahl
I was gutted to discover that the Middlesex University Jewellery degree course will close down when the current first years have passed through the system, for I always look forward to reviewing this show. No other jewellery degree showcases the same level of inventiveness and skills, so it’s no wonder that Middlesex graduates permeate the whole of the UK craft industry. This year the students displayed their wares under bright spot lighting on unforgiving scaffolding sets, but I did my best to take flattering photos. Here are my favourites from the Un-Earthed show.

Free Range shows 2013-katrine standahl
These rings and bracelet by Katrine Standahl are made out of repurposed coloured pencils. She works by bonding together different materials such as wood, cork and metals, then segmenting the results into different pieces which the viewer is encouraged to visualise in their original form.

Crochet & recycled plastic necklaces by Kirke Raava
Crochet & recycled plastic kitchen utensil necklaces by Kirke Raava were inspired by her childhood in Estonia, and in particular her memories of traditional crochet, macrame and knit.

Like a curious jellyfish- knitted elastic & porcelain jewellery by Sabina Johal
This knitted elastic and porcelain piece by Sabina Johal reminds me of a curious jellyfish. She has a particular interest in using unconventional materials in jewellery and her work is inspired by a fascination with tribal jewellery and medical supports such as bandages and splints.

ellie lee
Finger porcelain jewellery by Ellie Lee was showcased with leather on chains, and inside miniature bowls. Her work toys with an old Chinese tradition that says breaking ceramic is very bad luck: yet to access the personal porcelain body parts the bowls must be broken. Gruesome or cool?

Clever jewellery inspired by the weather from Emma Aitchison
Clever jewellery by Emma Aitchison is designed to interact with the weather, be it sun, wind or rain. The boldness and wearability of this sculptural collection could perhaps be traced back to a placement year when she interned with Scott Wilson, for she she has clearly been influenced by his large and playful dynamic. She then worked with milliner Piers Atkinson, after which she was offered a job making leather and metal work for his collections. Her professional website is well worth a look: Emma Aitchison is definitely a name to watch.

If you are graduating this year don’t forget to check out Amelia’s Award, in collaboration with the Secret Emporium. Enter your details and you could be in with a chance to kick start your creative career by receiving a scholarship worth £495 to sell your wares at Wilderness Festival this summer. Deadline: 2nd July 2013.

Categories ,2013, ,Ellie Lee, ,Emma Aitchison, ,Free Range Shows, ,jewellery, ,Katrine Standahl, ,Kirke Raava, ,middlesex university, ,piers atkinson, ,review, ,Sabina Johal, ,Scott Wilson, ,Un-Earthed

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Amelia’s Magazine | Free Range Graduate Shows 2012: Middlesex University Jewellery Ba Hons Review

Middlesex Uni -Chaca Jacobsen
Chaca Jacobsen.

The jewellery design course at Middlesex University habitually turns out some wonderful artisans and this year was no exception, with collections inspired by themes of tradition, adornment, religion, memory, value and social identity. I visited their workshops at the Hendon campus a few months ago and was incredibly impressed by their new facilities.

Francesca Tring
Francesca Tring
Francesca Tring was inspired by Memento Mori to create these curious, dark wooden brooches… sprouting tufts of fur.

Franziska Lusser
Middlesex University jewellery graduate show 2012-Franziska Lusser
Middlesex University jewellery graduate show 2012-Franziska Lusser
I’m a sucker for big jewellery such as Franziska Lusser‘s designs, which made clever use of common materials (plastic combined with metal dust) to create precious looking pendants on industrial chains.

Helen Maria Faliveno
Helen Maria Faliveno
Helen Maria Faliveno
I also love delicate jewellery. Helen Maria Faliveno remembers childhood obsessions in her Polly Pocket inspired charms.

Mesh Doganay
Mesh Doganay displayed dipped neon rings which she creates quickly in one sitting, improvising the design process as she progresses.

Louise Payjack-Guillou
Louise Payjack-Guillou
Louise Payjack-Guillou fossilised sea urchins into lockets and brooches.

Lydia Miriam Jones
Lydia Miriam Jones
Lydia Miriam Jones
Lydia Miriam Jones worked at the Neema Crafts Centre in Tanzania, which totally altered her attitudes to creating material goods. Her stunning display was created using a ‘bottle to beads’ recycling process. She collects materials and then transforms them through low-tech production such as slip casting, embracing inherent imperfections from the process.

Middlesex University jewellery graduate show 2012-Tanya Garfield
Middlesex University jewellery graduate show 2012-Tanya Garfield
He loves me, he loves me not…

Middlesex University jewellery graduate show 2012-Tanya Garfield
Delicate necklaces by Tanya Garfield were one of my stand out favourites in the show. By combining common sayings and the intricacies of Morse Code she has produced beautiful and desirable necklaces – something which is often difficult to do with more conceptual work.

Christiana Christoforou
Christiana Christoforou
Christiana Christoforou began her final work by leaving clay at the entrance to stranger’s homes in London, with a message inviting them to imprint something of their identity into the material. From this she had created intriguing medallions which encompass the abstract and the recognisable (a Lego figurine, Donald Duck.)

Lydia Wood-Power
Lydia Wood-Power mixed past and present in her colourful formica collection. Alongside creating jewellery she also runs a ‘vintage’ 1950s style tea room in Streatham Hill, which she opened in her year out. She works in a studio behind it: what a wonderful idea!

Samantha Cobb
Samantha Cobb‘s tiny metal amulets reminded me of paper boats or paper hats.

Middlesex University jewellery graduate show 2012-Middlesex Uni -Chaca Jacobsen
Middlesex University jewellery graduate show 2012-Middlesex Uni -Chaca Jacobsen
Using an eclectic mix of high gloss acrylic and a touch of gold, Chaca Jacobsen had created decorative yet functional necklaces with an elegant finish. ‘A ninja necklace awakes the spy; a Samurai sword-handle necklace our inner power and a police baton reflects a desire for control.

There is no doubt that this was a showcase for incredible techniques and thought process in jewellery making – I’d also love to see more collaboration with fashion, melding these skills with catwalk trends and influences. You can read my review of the 2011 graduate show here.

Categories ,2012, ,Chaca Jacobsen, ,Christiana Christoforou, ,Francesca Tring, ,Franziska Lusser, ,Free Range, ,Helen Maria Faliveno, ,Hendon campus, ,jewellery, ,Louise Payjack-Guillou, ,Lydia Miriam Jones, ,Lydia Wood-Power, ,Memento Mori, ,Memory, ,Mesh Doganay, ,middlesex university, ,Morse Code, ,Neema Crafts Centre, ,Polly Pocket, ,recycled, ,religion, ,review, ,Samantha Cobb, ,Social Identity, ,Tanya Garfield, ,Tanzania, ,Vintage tea room

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Amelia’s Magazine | Ciel: meet ethical fashion designer Sarah Ratty

Ciel S/S 2011 by Jo Cheung
Ciel S/S 2011 by Jo Cheung.

Sarah Ratty set up the label Conscious Earthwear in the early 90’s before creating the Ciel brand in 2005, website like this no rx which we profiled in the print version of Amelia’s Magazine. She currently also works as a design consultant and advises the Soil Association on sustainable issues.

How do you design your garments?
Each collection has its roots in the way I have developed as an eco fashion designer over the last twenty years. I usually start with fabrics, ambulance then I think about what garment shapes will best fit into the current zeitgeist and I combine these with my own influences from contemporary art, order travel, history and nature. I use as many innovative approaches as I can in fabrication and cutting techniques, as well as using the naturally diverse fabrics from a range of indigenous locations, which are made and developed in situ.

What is the best way to design ethically?
Within eco design there is inevitably some compromise but I always do my best to find the best materials to achieve the desired outcome. I use fairtrade materials and organic fabrics from factories in Europe and South America, all of which comply with fair labour laws as set out by Labour Behind the Label. We use azo-free dyes, which do not use harmful metal mordants to fix the colour. Heavy metals are highly polluting and contribute to toxic soil runoff if not treated correctly. We have recently started to bring some production back to the UK and we conduct a lot of our work via Skype to reduce our carbon footprint…

Read the rest of this interview with Ciel in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,azo-free dyes, ,Carbon footprint, ,ciel, ,Conscious Earthwear, ,Design Consultant, ,Eco fashion, ,Ethical Fashion, ,fairtrade, ,Jo Cheung, ,Labour behind the Label, ,organic, ,Sarah Ratty, ,Skype, ,Soil Association

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Amelia’s Magazine | Snarfle is One: Celebrating Baby, Motherhood and Work

Snarfle by Kirbi Fagan
Snarfle by Kirbi Fagan.

A few weeks ago my baby Snarfle celebrated his first birthday, so now seems like a good opportunity to look back on my first year as a mum running this website: after all Amelia’s Magazine has always reflected what is happening in my life.

Snarfle Sheep Cake by Claire Kearns
Snarfle’s Sheep Cake modelled on one of his favourite fluffy toys, by Claire Kearns.

I know it’s the biggest cliche of all, but nothing, nothing, can prepare you for becoming a parent. So when I was pregnant I made a big effort to prepare only for the birth, imagining that I would follow my instincts like every other mother down the millennia and everything beyond would just fall into place somehow. Sink or swim, right? I read nothing about parenting and bought the bare minimum, instead making good with second hand offerings from relatives and friends. Then all my great birth plans were thwarted… and I was left with a baby.

Snarfle and me swimming
Snarfle was ripped out of my stomach covered in poop, whisked away for tests, prodded and poked, and for the first days kept apart from me in a plastic bed, a huge cannula held aloft in his tiny hand. For the first month breast milk was forced into him via various artificial methods, and yet I instinctively knew I wanted to be as close to him as possible, and soon discovered that the common parlance for this is ‘Attachment Parenting‘. I even started reading a book about it. The world of parenting is rife with differing opinions, but my approach has been to follow what feels instinctively right: I always think about what we might have done for many thousands of years before we had so many gadgets to help us out, believing this to best from an evolutionary perspective. This has meant that I breastfeed on demand and intend to continue until he wants to stop, I carry him wherever I can, we sleep together most nights, I have followed baby led weaning techniques, we are learning baby signing, he wears non-disposable nappies (most of the time) and I have made attempts at elimination communication…

First birthday by Bethany Wigmore
First birthday by Bethany Wigmore.

Those endless baby bits and bobs scared me so much before I gave birth that I could not even look in a brochure, never mind go into a store. So many buggies to chose from! We have a family hand me down but we rarely use it. I was determined to get by with as few purchases as possible, which was probably why we had no clothes small enough for Snarfle when he arrived. He was so tiny that the only sleepsuit that fit properly for the first few weeks was a tiny scrap of material that my mother found in a charity shop. Inevitably, our lives have since filled up with baby paraphernalia.

Snarfle One by Jane Young
Snarfle is One by Jane Young.

Before birth my baby could only ever be an abstract notion: in fact although I have always loved children (and have spent a lot of time being a leader on FSC children’s camps) I never much liked babies – that is, before my own arrived. I had imagined them boring so avoided time with them, and in more recent years they have made me feel a bit sad as I feared I would never have one of my own. So nothing prepared me for the visceral physicality of having a baby: falling in love with this tiny person who is all my own creation, who has remained so closely attached to me as he has woken up to the world. Breastfeeding on demand, co-sleeping (sleeping in the same bed) and baby wearing have helped make motherhood an intoxicating physical experience that I will miss as he grows up and away from me: I now understand why some women are addicted to babies.

Baby Snarfle by Kim Jenkins
Baby Snarfle by Kim Jenkins.

And the love I feel for Snarfle is unquantifiable despite the many hard and tedious parts of being a new mum. Even when rocking him for hours every night (he is not an easy sleeper) I stand there and think: this, this, is amazing. He’s my greatest creative project, this little person who has somehow appeared in this world as though he was always meant to be, perfect, somehow, despite the flaws of his parents, despite his demanding ways. This time, it will be over so soon. I love every aspect of being a mother and feel I have to soak up every moment, for before I know it he will be 18.

Rainbow Cake by Christine Charnock
Rainbow Birthday Cake by Christine Charnock.

I started working again two weeks after Snarfle was born, with him sleeping against me as I typed. We didn’t leave the house until some time later: I was scared about how I would cope with him in the outside world when he seemed so precious and vulnerable. In the beginning getting on with work was relatively easy – he slept so much that I became very good at multi-tasking. But things change rapidly when you have a small baby and this year has passed ridiculously fast, routines constantly shifting to adapt to Snarfle‘s needs. Seen from afar it seems daunting, but you manage, there’s no alternative. Despite the constant tiredness and many small frustrations I have never been bored. I love learning a new skill and this is no exception – I have found the process of becoming a mother endlessly fascinating.

Neopolitan birthday cake by Jo Ley
Neopolitan birthday cake by Jo Ley.

I started work as a lecturer at Middlesex University one day a week in January (I am lucky enough that Snarfle can stay with my parents, so we commute down to their house in South London). This means that work on Amelia’s Magazine is squashed into ever decreasing time slots: currently these include a two hour stretch in the morning (if he sleeps) and after he goes to sleep at night, until I am too knackered to continue. My creativity has gone into overdrive and I have big plans for the magazine yet little time to carry any of my ideas out, but my frustrations are tempered by the knowledge that this time is so short and so precious: even though my mind may drift it is more important for me to be present with Snarfle than building my business. I have at times been jealous of other mums revelling in maternity leave for a full year, but ultimately I feel blessed that I can carry on being a (nearly) full time mum for much longer. I could not have had a child and sent him straight into the care of others – I want to be with him, to watch him grow. To listen to the birds together, help him learn animal sounds and primary colours (his current interests), and tend to our little garden now the weather is warming up. Baby sessions are now full of other mothers who have their own businesses… and lots of childminders and nannies.

Snarfle Oh Baby London space invaders bodysuit
So Snarfle is one year old, and I will continue the juggling act that I have created for myself, for much as I love being a hands on mother I always knew I could not only be a mum; my work will always be important too. I find myself increasingly drawn to the idea of home schooling (to the chagrin of my partner and family) but I don’t know how I would manage it. All I know is that I feel ridiculously blessed by my situation, and so thankful that Snarfle has entered my life.

Snarfle with elephant
I’ve already written about the joy of using real nappies, and over the coming weeks I will be blogging about other specific baby-related things such as baby wearing, breastfeeding, cosleeping and elimination communication. I’ll also be sharing with you the best lesser known clothing brands and makers of lovely unusual toys. I might even share my Quiet Book craft ideas, if I ever finish it. I’m writing about these things because there have been many times when I have scoured the internet, hoping to find more advice and information about my choices of parenting… so if this is a subject that is dear to your heart stay tuned, these writings will be popping up in between my other design focused blogs.

Categories ,Attachment Parenting, ,Baby, ,Bethany Wigmore, ,Breastfeeding, ,Christine Charnock, ,Claire Kearns, ,Co-sleeping, ,Elimination Communication, ,FSC, ,Jane Young, ,Jo Ley, ,Kim Jenkins, ,Kirbi Fagan, ,middlesex university, ,Parenting, ,Quiet Book, ,Real Nappies, ,Snarfle

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Amelia’s Magazine | Snarfle is One: Celebrating Baby, Motherhood and Work

Snarfle by Kirbi Fagan
Snarfle by Kirbi Fagan.

A few weeks ago my baby Snarfle celebrated his first birthday, so now seems like a good opportunity to look back on my first year as a mum running this website: after all Amelia’s Magazine has always reflected what is happening in my life.

Snarfle Sheep Cake by Claire Kearns
Snarfle’s Sheep Cake modelled on one of his favourite fluffy toys, by Claire Kearns.

I know it’s the biggest cliche of all, but nothing, nothing, can prepare you for becoming a parent. So when I was pregnant I made a big effort to prepare only for the birth, imagining that I would follow my instincts like every other mother down the millennia and everything beyond would just fall into place somehow. Sink or swim, right? I read nothing about parenting and bought the bare minimum, instead making good with second hand offerings from relatives and friends. Then all my great birth plans were thwarted… and I was left with a baby.

Snarfle and me swimming
Snarfle was ripped out of my stomach covered in poop, whisked away for tests, prodded and poked, and for the first days kept apart from me in a plastic bed, a huge cannula held aloft in his tiny hand. For the first month breast milk was forced into him via various artificial methods, and yet I instinctively knew I wanted to be as close to him as possible, and soon discovered that the common parlance for this is ‘Attachment Parenting‘. I even started reading a book about it. The world of parenting is rife with differing opinions, but my approach has been to follow what feels instinctively right: I always think about what we might have done for many thousands of years before we had so many gadgets to help us out, believing this to best from an evolutionary perspective. This has meant that I breastfeed on demand and intend to continue until he wants to stop, I carry him wherever I can, we sleep together most nights, I have followed baby led weaning techniques, we are learning baby signing, he wears non-disposable nappies (most of the time) and I have made attempts at elimination communication…

First birthday by Bethany Wigmore
First birthday by Bethany Wigmore.

Those endless baby bits and bobs scared me so much before I gave birth that I could not even look in a brochure, never mind go into a store. So many buggies to chose from! We have a family hand me down but we rarely use it. I was determined to get by with as few purchases as possible, which was probably why we had no clothes small enough for Snarfle when he arrived. He was so tiny that the only sleepsuit that fit properly for the first few weeks was a tiny scrap of material that my mother found in a charity shop. Inevitably, our lives have since filled up with baby paraphernalia.

Snarfle One by Jane Young
Snarfle is One by Jane Young.

Before birth my baby could only ever be an abstract notion: in fact although I have always loved children (and have spent a lot of time being a leader on FSC children’s camps) I never much liked babies – that is, before my own arrived. I had imagined them boring so avoided time with them, and in more recent years they have made me feel a bit sad as I feared I would never have one of my own. So nothing prepared me for the visceral physicality of having a baby: falling in love with this tiny person who is all my own creation, who has remained so closely attached to me as he has woken up to the world. Breastfeeding on demand, co-sleeping (sleeping in the same bed) and baby wearing have helped make motherhood an intoxicating physical experience that I will miss as he grows up and away from me: I now understand why some women are addicted to babies.

Baby Snarfle by Kim Jenkins
Baby Snarfle by Kim Jenkins.

And the love I feel for Snarfle is unquantifiable despite the many hard and tedious parts of being a new mum. Even when rocking him for hours every night (he is not an easy sleeper) I stand there and think: this, this, is amazing. He’s my greatest creative project, this little person who has somehow appeared in this world as though he was always meant to be, perfect, somehow, despite the flaws of his parents, despite his demanding ways. This time, it will be over so soon. I love every aspect of being a mother and feel I have to soak up every moment, for before I know it he will be 18.

Rainbow Cake by Christine Charnock
Rainbow Birthday Cake by Christine Charnock.

I started working again two weeks after Snarfle was born, with him sleeping against me as I typed. We didn’t leave the house until some time later: I was scared about how I would cope with him in the outside world when he seemed so precious and vulnerable. In the beginning getting on with work was relatively easy – he slept so much that I became very good at multi-tasking. But things change rapidly when you have a small baby and this year has passed ridiculously fast, routines constantly shifting to adapt to Snarfle‘s needs. Seen from afar it seems daunting, but you manage, there’s no alternative. Despite the constant tiredness and many small frustrations I have never been bored. I love learning a new skill and this is no exception – I have found the process of becoming a mother endlessly fascinating.

Neopolitan birthday cake by Jo Ley
Neopolitan birthday cake by Jo Ley.

I started work as a lecturer at Middlesex University one day a week in January (I am lucky enough that Snarfle can stay with my parents, so we commute down to their house in South London). This means that work on Amelia’s Magazine is squashed into ever decreasing time slots: currently these include a two hour stretch in the morning (if he sleeps) and after he goes to sleep at night, until I am too knackered to continue. My creativity has gone into overdrive and I have big plans for the magazine yet little time to carry any of my ideas out, but my frustrations are tempered by the knowledge that this time is so short and so precious: even though my mind may drift it is more important for me to be present with Snarfle than building my business. I have at times been jealous of other mums revelling in maternity leave for a full year, but ultimately I feel blessed that I can carry on being a (nearly) full time mum for much longer. I could not have had a child and sent him straight into the care of others – I want to be with him, to watch him grow. To listen to the birds together, help him learn animal sounds and primary colours (his current interests), and tend to our little garden now the weather is warming up. Baby sessions are now full of other mothers who have their own businesses… and lots of childminders and nannies.

Snarfle Oh Baby London space invaders bodysuit
So Snarfle is one year old, and I will continue the juggling act that I have created for myself, for much as I love being a hands on mother I always knew I could not only be a mum; my work will always be important too. I find myself increasingly drawn to the idea of home schooling (to the chagrin of my partner and family) but I don’t know how I would manage it. All I know is that I feel ridiculously blessed by my situation, and so thankful that Snarfle has entered my life.

Snarfle with elephant
I’ve already written about the joy of using real nappies, and over the coming weeks I will be blogging about other specific baby-related things such as baby wearing, breastfeeding, cosleeping and elimination communication. I’ll also be sharing with you the best lesser known clothing brands and makers of lovely unusual toys. I might even share my Quiet Book craft ideas, if I ever finish it. I’m writing about these things because there have been many times when I have scoured the internet, hoping to find more advice and information about my choices of parenting… so if this is a subject that is dear to your heart stay tuned, these writings will be popping up in between my other design focused blogs.

Categories ,Attachment Parenting, ,Baby, ,Bethany Wigmore, ,Breastfeeding, ,Christine Charnock, ,Claire Kearns, ,Co-sleeping, ,Elimination Communication, ,FSC, ,Jane Young, ,Jo Ley, ,Kim Jenkins, ,Kirbi Fagan, ,middlesex university, ,Parenting, ,Quiet Book, ,Real Nappies, ,Snarfle

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