Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: House of Holland

Lu Flux S/S 2011 collection was presented in the chapel of No. 1 Greek Street, visit web also known as the House of Saint Barnabas, a space supporting those affected by homelessness for over 160 years. It is an absolutely beautiful building, with an outside courtyard and lovely lounges. The non-for-profit private members club Quintessentially Soho uses the revenue generated by members to finance the House of Saint Barnabas’s support centre.

Illustrations by Alia Gargum

The presentation consisted of live painting, as the illustrator behind the stunning designs on the shorts suit drew the models, lots of cupcakes and fabulous shoes.

I absolutely love the dress the designer was wearing from last season’s collection:


The House of Holland Team! All illustrations by Lisa Stannard

House of Holland’s show this season was held at My Beautiful Fashion, information pills in the disused Old Sorting Office on New Oxford Street. There wasn’t too much hustle and bustle when I arrived and we moved swiftly in , look along with the huge clan of the HOH friends and family who were then greeted with champagne and showed to their seats in a block close to the front of the runway.

Then in came the HOH celebrity friends which included usual suspect Aggy Deyn, who ran in and over to her friends seconds before the lights dimmed to start the show. Nick Grimshaw, Lily Allen, Jamie Winstone and Pixie Geldoff were seated together in the front row. Other celebrities included Nicola Roberts and Amber Rose…

Anyway now I’ve got the celebrities out of the way, on with the show! The show opened with Donna Summer’s ‘Love to Love You Baby‘ when the first girl walked out with an ash blonde laid back 1970s hair do, metallic banana-leaf print blazer teamed with a pleated metallic leather mini skirt and chunky era wedges. I was shocked and pleasantly surprised by the first instalment of sexiness and sophistication.

As the next girls continued to strut down the runway there was a recurring theme with the banana leaves, which were in fact a woven jacquard. These fabrics came in green, purple and blue and were used as part of shirt dresses (another recurring theme) with lots of lengthy fringing, and on cropped pants, fitted cropped jackets and flares. I was really enjoying the styling, it was preppy and cool, yet was mixed with a lot more sophistication than Henry’s past collections.

Then these pieces began to change and along came jumpsuits with appliquéd stars all over followed by flowing knee length pleated chiffon skirts teamed with slouchy vests in a bold pinky/purple print. I liked this look a lot. This was Henry’s recognisable print of the season, which was a lot tamer than past slogans, crazy paislies and polka dots.

My favourite outfit was Henry’s cropped (banana leaf) print t-shirt, with rusty metallic print pleated leather skirt. It had the most amazing oversized backpack with tan leather trims.  This wasn’t the only accessory in there; there was a lot of luxe towelling used on even more bags! Huge pom pom earrings, too – which I wouldn’t wear – but great fun for this catwalk show. There were also socks teamed with the huge metallic platforms with crazy fringing on them, I wonder if these will be sold amongst his hosiery range too?

Denim made a reappearance but this time it was decorated with metallic appliqued stars. I have to say that I did enjoy the non-star appliquéd pieces more.  The aquamarine pleated chiffon dress and the floor length banana leaf print dress were far nicer.

Henry didn’t leave out the glitz – just when you thought you had summed up the themes of this collection, out walks another 1970s disco queen in a slinky super sparkly gold dress.

I felt that the collection had moved far away from slogan tees and tights and was a more sophisticated reflection of his inspirations. Maybe I am biased – I’m totally with his fun vibe and 1980s references, but I suppose as one of his target consumers that’s entirely the point.

I’m looking forward to future collections from Henry, but desperate to get my hands on that oversized backpack…!

All illustrations by Lisa Stannard

Categories ,1970s, ,Agyness Deyn, ,Alexa Chung, ,Amber Rose, ,Banana Leaf, ,disco, ,Donna Summer, ,Glamour, ,Grimmers, ,Henry Holland, ,House of Holland, ,Jaime Winstone, ,lily allen, ,Lisa Stannard, ,London Fashion Week, ,My Beautiful Fashion, ,S/S 2011

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Romina Karamanea

Illustration by Rob Wallace

JW Anderson’s Autumn Winter 2010 collection was a celebration of the understated. Opening the rather quiet menswear day at the BFC on September 23rd, buy information pills the designer’s Spring/Summer 2011 collection unleashed models dressed as Liberty sponsored waif and strays.

All Photography by Matt Bramford

The collection was luxe hippie, medicine a perennially popular look that rarely translate into the everyday, unless you happen to be a rock star from years’ past. Nevertheless, it is wonderfully pretty, especially when the boys came highly reminiscent of Jimi Hendrix’s flowery rock attire crossed with the early portraiture of Walker Evans.

Following his video presentation earlier during the week. JW Anderson choose to unleash his recent expansion into faery-esque womenswear onto the menswear catwalk, drawing a few raised eyebrows from a front row settling in for a day of uninterrupted menswear.


Inspired by the photography of William Gedney the collection captured a sense of youthful naive freedom last seen in the work of Sally Mann at The Photographers Gallery.

Illustration by Rob Wallace

A nod to American Youth subcultures, (everything is a nod these day, a rehash, a reminiscence) the clothes arrived as bleached out dreamy tie dyes combined with floral print trousers for the boys and long sheer skirts fitted underneath fisherman knits for the girls.

The collection, a homage to youthful runaways on the Great American Road trip was heavy in the literary romanticism in which JW Anderson excels.

For the finale, the models (beautifully styled by Robbie Spencer) sauntered to the youthful dissatisfaction of Jarvis Cocker’s Pulp, underneath the eery green light provided by lasers more commonly seen at Fabric.

Illustration by Rob Wallace

JW Anderson’s Autumn Winter 2010 collection was a celebration of the understated. Opening the rather quiet menswear day at the BFC on September 23rd, website like this the designer’s Spring/Summer 2011 collection unleashed models dressed as Liberty sponsored waif and strays.

All Photography by Matt Bramford

The collection was luxe hippie, look a perennially popular look that rarely translate into the everyday, cialis 40mg unless you happen to be a rock star from years’ past. Nevertheless, it is wonderfully pretty, especially when the boys came highly reminiscent of Jimi Hendrix’s flowery rock attire crossed with the early portraiture of Walker Evans.

Following his video presentation earlier during the week. JW Anderson choose to unleash his recent expansion into faery-esque womenswear onto the menswear catwalk, drawing a few raised eyebrows from a front row settling in for a day of uninterrupted menswear.


Inspired by the photography of William Gedney the collection captured a sense of youthful naive freedom last seen in the work of Sally Mann at The Photographers Gallery.

Illustration by Rob Wallace

A nod to American Youth subcultures, (everything is a nod these day, a rehash, a reminiscence) the clothes arrived as bleached out dreamy tie dyes combined with floral print trousers for the boys and long sheer skirts fitted underneath fisherman knits for the girls.

The collection, a homage to youthful runaways on the Great American Road trip was heavy in the literary romanticism in which JW Anderson excels.

For the finale, the models (beautifully styled by Robbie Spencer) sauntered to the youthful dissatisfaction of Jarvis Cocker’s Pulp, underneath the eery green light provided by lasers more commonly seen at Fabric.

Illustration by Rob Wallace

JW Anderson’s Autumn Winter 2010 collection was a celebration of the understated. Opening the rather quiet menswear day at the BFC on September 23rd, pharmacy the designer’s Spring/Summer 2011 collection unleashed models dressed as Liberty sponsored waif and strays.

All Photography by Matt Bramford

The collection was luxe hippie, a perennially popular look that rarely translate into the everyday, unless you happen to be a rock star from years’ past. Nevertheless, it is wonderfully pretty, especially when the boys came highly reminiscent of Jimi Hendrix’s flowery rock attire crossed with the early portraiture of Walker Evans.

Following his video presentation earlier during the week. JW Anderson choose to unleash his recent expansion into faery-esque womenswear onto the menswear catwalk, drawing a few raised eyebrows from a front row settling in for a day of uninterrupted menswear.


Inspired by the photography of William Gedney the collection captured a sense of youthful naive freedom last seen in the work of Sally Mann at The Photographers Gallery.

Illustration by Rob Wallace

A nod to American Youth subcultures, (everything is a nod these day, a rehash, a reminiscence) the clothes arrived as bleached out dreamy tie dyes combined with floral print trousers for the boys and long sheer skirts fitted underneath fisherman knits for the girls.

The collection, a homage to youthful runaways on the Great American Road trip was heavy in the literary romanticism in which JW Anderson excels.

For the finale, the models (beautifully styled by Robbie Spencer) sauntered to the youthful dissatisfaction of Jarvis Cocker’s Pulp, underneath the eery green light provided by lasers more commonly seen at Fabric.

Romina Karamanea skirt by Joana Faria
Romina Karamanea by Joana Faria.

For the past two seasons the good PRs for Romina Karamanea have ensured that there has been a ridiculously long queue of baying fashionistas gathered outside the venue before they will let anyone inside. And so it was that I found myself being battered around on the steps of the Freemasons’ Hall on Tuesday evening: it was late in the week and it wasn’t really what I wanted to deal with. My ex flatmate, for sale a stylist that I used to work for at The Face – we fell out – elbowed her way through with a bit of a hissy fit. I was seriously considering just calling it a day and going right home. But then security announced that it was “too late for stars” meaning that the complex sticker system on invites was about to be ditched, and the PRs next to me agreed that the most important people were at the front anyway – that would include me! love it when I feel less of a pleb – and it all looked good to go.

Romina Karamanea pants by Joana Faria
Romina Karamanea by Joana Faria
Romina Karamanea by Joana Faria.

Ushered into one of the gorgeous upper halls I was seated only three chairs down from my nemesis, who of course refused to acknowledge me. Which is just fine, our relationship never recovered after she moved out of my house and refused to pay her outstanding rent. But it did make me smile. Oh happy days. A funny little girl in latex stockings was placed between us and quickly presented me with her card and a badge. I had to spend the whole show trying to take photos around her as she leaned into the catwalk to take hers, but in the grand tradition of fashion week poseurs she sure was good at attracting attention.

Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina-Karamanea-by-Lisa-Stannard
Romina Karamanea by Lisa Stannard.

For this season Greek born, Central Saint Martins trained Romina looked to abstract expressionism for inspiration, though as her press release cheekily says, basically “the designer had popped to see her artist friend Hermes for a glass of wine.” Three colour stories of white, bluey green and red explored passionate brush strokes and the patterns of natural phenomena and geology. Opposing structures morphed into one garment, voluminous swathes of chiffon colliding with cleanly structured tailoring. It was a big collection that included a smattering of menswear but my favourite pieces were undoubtedly the final ones, glorious rich red undergarments topped with sweeping patterned dresses. Utterly divine.

Romina Karamanea by Joana Faria
Romina Karamanea by Joana Faria
Romina Karamanea by Joana Faria.

I wasn’t aware that Romina Karamanea was an advocate of sustainable design until I found a leaflet featuring her work in the basement at Esthetica, where the Centre for Sustainable Fashion had a corner stand showcasing some of the designers they work with. This organisation was set up by the London College of Fashion, with the aim of “challenging and provoking the established fashion system to work towards the goals of promoting human well being and respecting nature’s limits, whilst creating beauty and style.” Fashion designers are invited to attend workshops and one to one mentoring sessions about how to implement sustainable design practices and apparently Romina is one of their ambassadors, which is very exciting news.

Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina-Karamanea-by-Lisa-Stannard
Romina Karamanea by Lisa Stannard.

But a line in the first paragraph of her blurb immediately made my heart sink just a tiny bit. And not just because of the bad grammar. “Each piece is designed to be loved and kept forever getting better over-time, hopefully like the wearer.” Along with the notion of upcycling (now a far trendier way to say recycling in fashion circles) and making the most of factory waste – both of which I hasten to add are admirable choices when it comes to making fashion – creating clothes to be worn for a long time has become a bit of a get out quick clause for designers. It’s an easy statement to trot out because high fashion is invariably all about luxury and has a price tag to match. Not many people who invest in designer pieces are likely to throw away their purchases every season.

Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

But let’s just stop and think a bit more here. The reality is that these designers continue to show new collections, and we are inevitably urged to delve deep and create ourselves a new wardrobe each time a new season comes around. I only very rarely buy new clothes myself but I can’t claim to be completely removed from the process because I also get really excited about new creativity on the catwalks. It’s an innate human excitement that you can’t take away, but it’s how we deal with that feeling that counts. Of course I am against throwaway mass produced fashion, but sustainability cannot be achieved merely by saying that people should treasure clothes forever, not whilst producing a new collection twice a year with no deeper links to sustainable practice.

Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

Reading on, I applaud Romina Karamanea‘s efforts. She is careful to fully research her supply chain, reduce fabric waste, utilise low impact digital printing techniques and organic cottons. She’s an edgy designer with a big following who can really affect people’s perception of working in a sustainable way. But it’s interesting that none of this information was on the press release for the catwalk show, or on her website: after all, who wants to be pigeonholed? It says a lot about how we still perceive an ethical imperative in design.

Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

Categories ,Central Saint Martins, ,Centre for Sustainable Fashion, ,Defying Mainstream, ,esthetica, ,ethical design, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Greek, ,Joana Faria, ,lfw, ,Lisa Stannard, ,London College of Fashion, ,London Fashion Week, ,Romina Karamanea, ,sustainability, ,The Defiant, ,The Face

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Exhibition Review: Vauxhall Fashion Scout

Bolshie-A-W-2010-Amelias-Magazine-Antonia-Parker-A
Bolshie AKA Baby-Leg Girl, seek abortion by Antonia Parker.

Over at Fashion Scout there is yet another array of amazing new designers to trawl through. As I entered the upstairs room at the Freemasons’ Hall I was greeted by a girl with plastic roast chickens attached to her breasts and fanny. Perfect for Lady Gaga.

Fashion Scout LFW SS2011-Bolshie photo By Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Bolshie
Those chickens, approved that spike-encrusted big-shouldered body suit, the top knot, the headless doll on a chain: something was ringing a very big bell. And it wasn’t the giant gold glittery Big Ben headpiece in the corner. I turned around and went “oh, it’s you!”

Fashion Scout LFW SS2011-Bolshie photo By Amelia Gregory

For it was none other than Baby-Leg Girl. Bolshie is 18 year old Rhiannon Jones, thrown out of her East Yorkshire school at the tender age of 15 years old and now residing in fashion centrale, Shoreditch.

Bolshie-S-S-2011-Antonia-Parker-Amelias-Magazine-A
Bolshie by Antonia Parker.

We noticed her everywhere last season, usually to be found obscuring our view with giant shoulders and hair – little did we realise that this daring and very ambitious fashionista has got her very own label a spot at Fashion Scout. She’s even made it onto the local BBC news. Now there’s two fingers up at her old school eh?

Fashion Scout LFW SS2011-Bolshie photo By Amelia Gregory

The collection is a massive mashup of contemporary culture, full of passionate bravado. Think Mickey Mouse ears on a police helmet, guns, watch-encrusted glittery jackets, a print that appears to feature Coca-Cola baby bottles and of course the odd Baby-Leg adornment. I wonder if she ever reads Super Super? You can see her entire collection here. Keep a beady eye on this one. She’s still only a teenager for gawd’s sake.

Fashion Scout LFW SS2011-Bolshie photo By Amelia Gregory
Fashion Scout LFW SS2011-Bolshie photo By Amelia Gregory
Fashion Scout LFW SS2011-Bolshie photo By Amelia Gregory

James Hock
This is the third season for the ex-accountant from Australia. But that’s about all I know about James Hock, since his website is ridiculously economical with any biographical information. The Unloved is a bold and playful collection of entirely black and red garments, based on an emotional journey. “It is sadness with a flickering of hope but ultimately, it is about the acceptance of fate.” So says the press release. Sheer fabrics are adorned with Swarovski crystals and juxtaposed against huge asymmetrical harlequin shapes cut across pantaloons, mini crinolines, sharp-shouldered capes and hybrid trouser-shorts. Audacious and definitely not for the faint hearted, he is currently stocked in uber trendy shop Machine-A.

James-Hock-by-Lisa-Stannard
James-Hock-by-Lisa-Stannard
James-Hock-by-Lisa-Stannard
James Hock by Lisa Stannard.

Kirsty Ward
Kirsty Ward graduated from Central Saint Martins MA in 2008 since when she has been working with Alberta Ferretti in Italy. S/S 2011 saw the launch of her own label at Fashion Scout but I remember well how astonished I was by her jewellery for David Longshaw last season. Her own collection features amazing sculptural creations that echo the lines of the body in sheer pastel panels shaped with exaggerated wire and piping. Many pieces have integral jewellery or are meant to be worn with her huge wire and crystal bead necklaces in shades of pale peach and mint green.

Fashion Scout Kirsty Ward photo by Amelia Gregory
Fashion Scout Kirsty Ward photo by Amelia Gregory

She was wearing an earring necklace when I met her: dangling earrings that connect under the chin. I’d personally be incredibly worried about pulling my earlobes off if I wore this creation, but she rocked the look with admirable confidence. I think a bit of upcycling could definitely fit into her aesthetic and I did nonchalantly suggest that she could use some old wire coat hangers… Definitely a new designer to keep a firm eye on.

felice perkins kirsty ward
felice perkins kirsty ward
felice perkins kirsty ward
Kirsty Ward by Felice Perkins.

Yong
Special mention goes to Yong, who studied at Edinburgh College of Art and Design before passing through the hallowed years of an MA at Central Saint Martins. He makes clever and elegant dresses, advised by my old friend Jason Leung.

Fashion Scout LFW SS2011- Jason Leung photo By Amelia Gregory
Jason Leung.

I particularly liked the royal blue dress with amazing white ruffled embroidery, but I think I need to see more of these dresses worn to really appreciate them. In fact I’d like to see all of these designers on the catwalk. Here’s hoping…

Fashion Scout LFW SS2011- Jason Leung photo By Amelia Gregory

Categories ,Alberta Ferretti, ,Antonia Parker, ,Baby-leg girl, ,Bolshie, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Fashion Scout, ,Felice Perkins, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,James Hock, ,Jason Leung, ,Kirsty Ward, ,Lady Gaga, ,Lisa Stannard, ,Machine-A, ,Rhiannon Jones, ,Super Super, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Yong

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Exhibition Review: Vauxhall Fashion Scout

Bolshie-A-W-2010-Amelias-Magazine-Antonia-Parker-A
Bolshie AKA Baby-Leg Girl, seek abortion by Antonia Parker.

Over at Fashion Scout there is yet another array of amazing new designers to trawl through. As I entered the upstairs room at the Freemasons’ Hall I was greeted by a girl with plastic roast chickens attached to her breasts and fanny. Perfect for Lady Gaga.

Fashion Scout LFW SS2011-Bolshie photo By Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Bolshie
Those chickens, approved that spike-encrusted big-shouldered body suit, the top knot, the headless doll on a chain: something was ringing a very big bell. And it wasn’t the giant gold glittery Big Ben headpiece in the corner. I turned around and went “oh, it’s you!”

Fashion Scout LFW SS2011-Bolshie photo By Amelia Gregory

For it was none other than Baby-Leg Girl. Bolshie is 18 year old Rhiannon Jones, thrown out of her East Yorkshire school at the tender age of 15 years old and now residing in fashion centrale, Shoreditch.

Bolshie-S-S-2011-Antonia-Parker-Amelias-Magazine-A
Bolshie by Antonia Parker.

We noticed her everywhere last season, usually to be found obscuring our view with giant shoulders and hair – little did we realise that this daring and very ambitious fashionista has got her very own label a spot at Fashion Scout. She’s even made it onto the local BBC news. Now there’s two fingers up at her old school eh?

Fashion Scout LFW SS2011-Bolshie photo By Amelia Gregory

The collection is a massive mashup of contemporary culture, full of passionate bravado. Think Mickey Mouse ears on a police helmet, guns, watch-encrusted glittery jackets, a print that appears to feature Coca-Cola baby bottles and of course the odd Baby-Leg adornment. I wonder if she ever reads Super Super? You can see her entire collection here. Keep a beady eye on this one. She’s still only a teenager for gawd’s sake.

Fashion Scout LFW SS2011-Bolshie photo By Amelia Gregory
Fashion Scout LFW SS2011-Bolshie photo By Amelia Gregory
Fashion Scout LFW SS2011-Bolshie photo By Amelia Gregory

James Hock
This is the third season for the ex-accountant from Australia. But that’s about all I know about James Hock, since his website is ridiculously economical with any biographical information. The Unloved is a bold and playful collection of entirely black and red garments, based on an emotional journey. “It is sadness with a flickering of hope but ultimately, it is about the acceptance of fate.” So says the press release. Sheer fabrics are adorned with Swarovski crystals and juxtaposed against huge asymmetrical harlequin shapes cut across pantaloons, mini crinolines, sharp-shouldered capes and hybrid trouser-shorts. Audacious and definitely not for the faint hearted, he is currently stocked in uber trendy shop Machine-A.

James-Hock-by-Lisa-Stannard
James-Hock-by-Lisa-Stannard
James-Hock-by-Lisa-Stannard
James Hock by Lisa Stannard.

Kirsty Ward
Kirsty Ward graduated from Central Saint Martins MA in 2008 since when she has been working with Alberta Ferretti in Italy. S/S 2011 saw the launch of her own label at Fashion Scout but I remember well how astonished I was by her jewellery for David Longshaw last season. Her own collection features amazing sculptural creations that echo the lines of the body in sheer pastel panels shaped with exaggerated wire and piping. Many pieces have integral jewellery or are meant to be worn with her huge wire and crystal bead necklaces in shades of pale peach and mint green.

Fashion Scout Kirsty Ward photo by Amelia Gregory
Fashion Scout Kirsty Ward photo by Amelia Gregory

She was wearing an earring necklace when I met her: dangling earrings that connect under the chin. I’d personally be incredibly worried about pulling my earlobes off if I wore this creation, but she rocked the look with admirable confidence. I think a bit of upcycling could definitely fit into her aesthetic and I did nonchalantly suggest that she could use some old wire coat hangers… Definitely a new designer to keep a firm eye on.

felice perkins kirsty ward
felice perkins kirsty ward
felice perkins kirsty ward
Kirsty Ward by Felice Perkins.

Yong
Special mention goes to Yong, who studied at Edinburgh College of Art and Design before passing through the hallowed years of an MA at Central Saint Martins. He makes clever and elegant dresses, advised by my old friend Jason Leung.

Fashion Scout LFW SS2011- Jason Leung photo By Amelia Gregory
Jason Leung.

I particularly liked the royal blue dress with amazing white ruffled embroidery, but I think I need to see more of these dresses worn to really appreciate them. In fact I’d like to see all of these designers on the catwalk. Here’s hoping…

Fashion Scout LFW SS2011- Jason Leung photo By Amelia Gregory

Categories ,Alberta Ferretti, ,Antonia Parker, ,Baby-leg girl, ,Bolshie, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Fashion Scout, ,Felice Perkins, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,James Hock, ,Jason Leung, ,Kirsty Ward, ,Lady Gaga, ,Lisa Stannard, ,Machine-A, ,Rhiannon Jones, ,Super Super, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Yong

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Presentation Review: Antipodium

FADAwards-the tightrope walker-Florence Melrose by-Barbara-Ana-G
The Tightrope Walker – an illustration of a dress designed by Florence Melrose, medications illustrated by Barbara Ana Gomez.

I’m a bit rubbish when it actually comes to checking what’s what during fashion week – I will generally go to most things that I’m invited to on the grounds that if someone has bothered to invite me then I should generally return the honour by actually turning up. Not so most magazine editors I might add – many was the time that I would swan into a fashion show under the guise of Katie Grand at The Face. She never went, information pills and yours truly got the golden tickets.

FAD awards SS2011 - abi daker
Dress by Rebecca Glyn-Blanco of Camden School for Girls. Illustration by Abigail Daker.

FADAwards Keep it secret-by-Barbara-Ana-Gomez
Keep it Secret – illustration of a dress by Sinead Cloonan from City & Islington College by Barbara Ana Gomez.

And as I’ve already mentioned I don’t do queues – not in Tescos, buy and certainly not during fashion week. To this end my heart sank as I rounded the corner to Freemasons’ Hall and found a line of people streaming down the street. What was this FAD awards malarkey anyway? Heading to the front of the queue I waggled my ticket at an unknown PR person and hoped for the best, so was somewhat surprised to be informed in hushed tones that I was a VIP and could go straight on through. Upstairs in one of the many architecturally fabulous chambers, Matt and I sipped on sweet fizzy stuff as we tried to figure out what this was all about.

FAD-Awards-sketches-Amelias-Magazine-by-kila_kitu
FAD-Awards 2010-Kila Kitu
Dress by Emily Rogers of Salford City College as illustrated by Kila Kitu.

Apparently we’ve been very supportive of FAD in the past, and once I’d looked up our previous coverage it did suddenly all ring a bell. But I wasn’t quite prepared for the sheer unadulterated upbeat joy of this event. Right in the thick of a hectic fashion week it’s a true testament to the achievement of this organisation that I could sit through yet another long catwalk show and come out the other end beaming with goodwill.

LFW_FAD_Awards_Abigail_Nottingham
The European Fashion Designer award winning dress from Paul Vasileff and Shahira Bakhoum. Illustrated by Abigail Nottingham.

FADAwards Flower-Rebecca Glyn-Blanco by-Barbara-Ana-G
Rebecca Glyn-Blanco by Barbara Ana Gomez.

Just to recap quickly, FAD stands for Fashion Awareness Direct and it is a charity that aims to empower young people – as the brochure says “Fashion is a great way to connect with young people from different backgrounds, to give them confidence and raise their aspirations for the future.”

FAD awards SS2011 - Adam Preece by Abi Daker
Adam Preece by Abigail Daker.

LFW_FAD_awards Chelsey Ward by Abigail-Nottingham
Chelsey Ward by Abigail Nottingham.

Last year we covered the undergraduates awards show, but this year we were in for a much younger treat: the FAD Junior Awards showcased the designs of finalists chosen from 130 teenagers aged 16-19. Yes dear reader, you may well have to keep pinching yourself as you take a look through the images. I know I did, and I was sitting right there when they paraded past. Created over the course of five days at the University of East London with the help of an experienced team of tutors, the outfits put together by these young designers would put many graduates to shame.

LFW_FAD_Awards Karmen-Marie Parker by Abigail_Nottingham
Karmen-Marie Parker by Abigail Nottingham.

FAD-Awards-Natalie Goreham by-kila_kitu
Natalie Goreham by Kila Kitu.

To start off the evening’s events previous winner Prash Muraleetharan took to the stage with a bit of confident advice, endearingly delivered. “It’s what you do with this moment which determines a winner…. so get upstairs and network,” he advised, somewhat sagely. At the end he winked. And I’m sure he winked at me. Blimey… what a charmer… it’s quite hard to countenance that Prash must still be a teenager, and yet he already runs his own fashion label with a website and everything.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prash Muraleetharan dispels his words of wisdom at the start of the ceremony. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

After the catwalk show we had speeches from the sleek Susan Aubrey-Cound of M&S and Helen Carter of UEL, followed by the prizegiving by the extremely fabulous Zandra Rhodes, who is *the cutest* when she smiles! The winners and their parents looked so overwhelmed it really did warm the cockles of my jaded fashionista heart.

Zandra-Rhodes-FAD-Awards-2010-Antonia-Parker-Amelias-Magazine-A
Zandra Rhodes by Antonia Parker. I wuv her.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Paul Vasileff and Shahira Bakhoum of Milan step up first to take the prize for the European Fashion Designer Competition, which was the culmination of a two year project.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Karmen-Marie Parker with her winning design shortly before she burst into tears… aw, bless.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Andre Augusto: pattern cutting award winner.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Research award winner Sarah Kilkenny.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
17 year old David Short – the first boy to become overall winner and a proper little fashionista in the making.

Within this blog you’ll find my favourite pieces to hit the runway – and just remember, they were all designed and made by 16-19 year olds. Quite astonishing I’m sure you’ll agree.

FAD junior awards 2010 Shomari Williams photo by Amelia Gregory
Shomari Williams.

FAD junior awards 2010 Emily Rogers photo by Amelia Gregory
Emily Rogers.

FAD junior awards 2010 Charlie Ibouillie photo by Amelia Gregory
Charlie Ibouillie.

FAD junior awards 2010 Sinead Cloonan photo by Amelia Gregory
Sinead Cloonan.

FAD junior awards 2010 European winners photo by Amelia Gregory
FAD junior awards 2010 European winners photo by Amelia Gregory
The winner of the European competition.

FAD junior awards 2010 Rebecca Glyn-Blanco photo by Amelia Gregory
Rebecca Glyn-Blanco.

FAD junior awards 2010 Natalie Goreham photo by Amelia Gregory
Natalie Goreham.

FAD junior awards 2010 Florence Melrose photo by Amelia Gregory
Florence Melrose.

FAD junior awards 2010 Misbah Siddique photo by Amelia Gregory
Misbah Siddique.

FAD junior awards 2010 Zandra Rhodes photo by Amelia Gregory
And another completely gratuitous shot of Zandra because this post isn’t long enough already. Because I WUV HER.

FADAwards-the tightrope walker-Florence Melrose by-Barbara-Ana-G
The Tightrope Walker – an illustration of a dress designed by Florence Melrose, ed illustrated by Barbara Ana Gomez.

I’m a bit rubbish when it actually comes to checking what’s what during fashion week – I will generally go to most things that I’m invited to on the grounds that if someone has bothered to invite me then I should generally return the honour by actually turning up. Not so most magazine editors I might add – many was the time that I would swan into a fashion show under the guise of Katie Grand at The Face. She never went, information pills and yours truly got the golden tickets.

FAD awards SS2011 - abi daker
Dress by Rebecca Glyn-Blanco of Camden School for Girls. Illustration by Abigail Daker.

FADAwards Keep it secret-by-Barbara-Ana-Gomez
Keep it Secret – illustration of a dress by Sinead Cloonan from City & Islington College by Barbara Ana Gomez.

And as I’ve already mentioned I don’t do queues – not in Tescos, and certainly not during fashion week. To this end my heart sank as I rounded the corner to Freemasons’ Hall and found a line of people streaming down the street. What was this FAD awards malarkey anyway? Heading to the front of the queue I waggled my ticket at an unknown PR person and hoped for the best, so was somewhat surprised to be informed in hushed tones that I was a VIP and could go straight on through. Upstairs in one of the many architecturally fabulous chambers, Matt and I sipped on sweet fizzy stuff as we tried to figure out what this was all about.

FAD-Awards-sketches-Amelias-Magazine-by-kila_kitu
FAD-Awards 2010-Kila Kitu
Dress by Yashodah Rodgers as illustrated by Kila Kitu.

Apparently we’ve been very supportive of FAD in the past, and once I’d looked up our previous coverage it did suddenly all ring a bell. But I wasn’t quite prepared for the sheer unadulterated upbeat joy of this event. Right in the thick of a hectic fashion week it’s a true testament to the achievement of this organisation that I could sit through yet another long catwalk show and come out the other end beaming with goodwill.

LFW_FAD_Awards_Abigail_Nottingham
The European Fashion Designer award winning dress from Paul Vasileff and Shahira Bakhoum. Illustrated by Abigail Nottingham.

FADAwards Flower-Rebecca Glyn-Blanco by-Barbara-Ana-G
Rebecca Glyn-Blanco by Barbara Ana Gomez.

Just to recap quickly, FAD stands for Fashion Awareness Direct and it is a charity that aims to empower young people – as the brochure says “Fashion is a great way to connect with young people from different backgrounds, to give them confidence and raise their aspirations for the future.”

FAD awards SS2011 - Adam Preece by Abi Daker
Adam Preece by Abigail Daker.

LFW_FAD_awards Chelsey Ward by Abigail-Nottingham
Chelsey Ward by Abigail Nottingham.

Last year we covered the undergraduates awards show, but this year we were in for a much younger treat: the FAD Junior Awards showcased the designs of finalists chosen from 130 teenagers aged 16-19. Yes dear reader, you may well have to keep pinching yourself as you take a look through the images. I know I did, and I was sitting right there when they paraded past. Created over the course of five days at the University of East London with the help of an experienced team of tutors, the outfits put together by these young designers would put many graduates to shame.

LFW_FAD_Awards Karmen-Marie Parker by Abigail_Nottingham
Karmen-Marie Parker by Abigail Nottingham.

FAD-Awards-Natalie Goreham by-kila_kitu
Natalie Goreham by Kila Kitu.

To start off the evening’s events previous winner Prash Muraleetharan took to the stage with a bit of confident advice, endearingly delivered. “It’s what you do with this moment which determines a winner…. so get upstairs and network,” he advised, somewhat sagely. At the end he winked. And I’m sure he winked at me. Blimey… what a charmer… it’s quite hard to countenance that Prash must still be a teenager, and yet he already runs his own fashion label with a website and everything.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prash Muraleetharan dispels his words of wisdom at the start of the ceremony. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

After the V&A inspired catwalk show we had speeches from the sleek Susan Aubrey-Cound of M&S and Lucy Jones of UEL, followed by the prizegiving by the extremely fabulous Zandra Rhodes, who is *the cutest* when she smiles! The winners and their parents looked so overwhelmed it really did warm the cockles of my jaded fashionista heart.

Zandra-Rhodes-FAD-Awards-2010-Antonia-Parker-Amelias-Magazine-A
Zandra Rhodes by Antonia Parker. I wuv her.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Paul Vasileff and Shahira Bakhoum of Milan step up first to take the prize for the European Fashion Designer Competition, which was the culmination of a two year project.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Karmen-Marie Parker with her winning design shortly before she burst into tears… aw, bless.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Andre Augusto: pattern cutting award winner.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Research award winner Sarah Kilkenny.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
17 year old David Short – the first boy to become overall winner and a proper little fashionista in the making.

Within this blog you’ll find my favourite pieces to hit the runway – and just remember, they were all designed and made by 16-19 year olds. Quite astonishing I’m sure you’ll agree.

FAD junior awards 2010 Shomari Williams photo by Amelia Gregory
Shomari Williams.

FAD junior awards 2010 Emily Rogers photo by Amelia Gregory
Yashodah Rodgers.

FAD junior awards 2010 Charlie Ibouillie photo by Amelia Gregory
Charlie Ibouillie.

FAD junior awards 2010 Sinead Cloonan photo by Amelia Gregory
Sinead Cloonan.

FAD junior awards 2010 European winners photo by Amelia Gregory
FAD junior awards 2010 European winners photo by Amelia Gregory
The winner of the European competition.

FAD junior awards 2010 Rebecca Glyn-Blanco photo by Amelia Gregory
Rebecca Glyn-Blanco.

FAD junior awards 2010 Natalie Goreham photo by Amelia Gregory
Natalie Goreham.

FAD junior awards 2010 Florence Melrose photo by Amelia Gregory
Florence Melrose.

FAD junior awards 2010 Misbah Siddique photo by Amelia Gregory
Misbah Siddique.

FAD junior awards 2010 Zandra Rhodes photo by Amelia Gregory
And another completely gratuitous shot of Zandra because this post isn’t long enough already. Because I WUV HER.

LFW-Antipodium-Andrea-Peterson
Antipodium by Andrea Peterson.

Antipodium was a shop that used to stock Amelia’s Magazine many a moon ago… run by Ozzies, stuff it has always championed Ozzie design. and apparently cake. At the Antipodium show at the Portico Rooms, visit Somerset House we were served up some delicious delicacies from down under.

Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Homemade cake: always good. And to think, unhealthy not a cupcake in sight *thank god*

Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

LFW-Antipodium by Jo Cheung
Antipodium by Jo Cheung.

Antipodium by Lisa Stannard
Antipodium by Lisa Stannard.

Antipodium the label grew out of the boutique as it found itself home to all sorts of creative types. Owner Ashe Peacock launched the brand in 2006 with former intern Geoffrey J. Finch, and since then it seems they’ve been quietly growing something of a reputation for its easy going style – a result of their down-to-earth Australian background.

Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW-Antipodium-Andrea-Peterson
Antipodium by Andrea Peterson.

For S/S 2011 Antipodium took the “brutalist beauty of the Barbican hothouse as a starting point” – possibly the reason for the backdrop of huge potted plants. Filtered through the steamy social mores of the 1970s all sorts of scurrilous goings-on were imagined in the nooks and crannies of this iconic building.

Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW-Antipodium by Paolo-Caravello
Antipodium by Paolo Caravello.

In reality this meant a cleanly classic collection spiced up with great little details, shown on a range of young models who had obviously been instructed to act louche. This for me is where models fail – they’re too young to be convincing, to act anything other than the most basic of parts. But this didn’t distract from my enjoyment of the hugely successful collection – after all I didn’t read the accompanying bumpf until just now.

Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW-Antipodium by Jo Cheung
Antipodium by Jo Cheung.

Wearing a muted colour palette of mossy greens, khaki, pale blue, aubergine, dusky pink and fawn the models paraded to the music of two DJs hidden in the corner. Stand outs were the clever use of fabrics and detailing; waffly knitwear, silky shirting, the subtle A shape in the back of a man’s beautifully cut coat. But best of all had to be the prints: commissioned from Australian born (of course) New York artist Craig Redman, these featured double-take patterns: oversized limbs, bespectacled butterflies and strange blooms. Can you tell I trained as a printed textile designer? Always the colour and patterns for me… Fabulous stuff.

Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Antipodium SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Antipodium-by-Lisa-Stannard
Antipodium by Lisa Stannard.

LFW-Antipodium by Jo Cheung
LFW-Antipodium by Jo Cheung
Antipodium by Jo Cheung.

Categories ,1970s, ,Andrea Peterson, ,Antipodium, ,Ashe Peacock, ,Australian, ,barbican, ,Cake, ,Craig Redman, ,Geoffrey J. Finch, ,Jo Cheung, ,Lisa Stannard, ,Paolo Caravello, ,Portico Rooms, ,Somerset House

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Blow Presents Eleanor Amoroso

Eleanor Amoroso LFW SS12 by Gilly Rochester
Eleanor Amoroso S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester.

Eleanor Amoroso‘s show made me nervous. I find it really hard to watch models struggle with shoes and that is exactly what happened to every poor sod as she made that first awkward turn in gigantic knife edge platforms at the top of the catwalk. They may have looked good when not in motion but I am afraid I just don’t get non-functional footwear: I spent the whole show playing will-she-won’t-she in my head and let me tell you that it was a distraction from admiring the clothes. The shoes were designed in collaboration with Julia Kaldy, dosage whose website features some much more wearable designs. Fashion, visit this eh?

Eleanor Amoroso SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Eleanor Amoroso SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Eleanor Amoroso SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Eleanor Amoroso SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Eleanor Amoroso SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Eleanor Amoroso SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
eleanor amoroso S/S 2012 by Lisa Stannard
Eleanor Amoroso S/S 2012 by Lisa Stannard.

Eleanor Amoroso graduated from the University of Westminster last year and has interned with the likes of Charlie Le Mindu, evident in her daring approach to garment construction. For her S/S 2012 collection she worked entirely in monochrome, presenting outfits in either cream (with just the tiniest hint of dip dye) or pitch black. Each piece was a handcrafted exploration of the amazing possibilities of crochet; woven and plaited breast plates fringed with swaying masses of thread that just about covered crucial body parts.

Eleanor Amoroso SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Eleanor Amoroso SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Eleanor Amoroso SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Eleanor Amoroso SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Eleanor Amoroso SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Eleanor Amoroso SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Eleanor Amoroso SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Eleanor Amoroso S/S 2012 by Rachel Higham.
Eleanor Amoroso S/S 2012 by Rachel Higham.

Whilst Eleanor Amoroso‘s talent is undoubtable I would love to see a bit more development in terms of garment style; at present I can only see these outfits being worn for fashion shoots when really we should be admiring them on the red carpet.

Eleanor Amoroso SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Eleanor Amoroso SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Eleanor Amoroso S/S 2012. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,Blow PR, ,Blow Presents, ,Charlie le Mindu, ,crochet, ,Dip-dye, ,Eleanor Amoroso, ,footwear, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Handcrafted, ,Julia Kaldy, ,Lisa Stannard, ,LSO St Luke’s, ,monochrome, ,platforms, ,Rachel Higham, ,University of Westminster

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Blow Presents Fanny and Jessy

Fanny and Jessy S/S 2012 by Diela Maharanie
Fanny and Jessy S/S 2012 by Diela Maharanie.

Fanny and Jessy have a great name that suits their cute, diagnosis fun clothing, ambulance worn by such luminaries as Lady Gaga, buy information pills Jessie J and Saint Saviour. The design duo hail from Somerset and graduated from the London College of Fashion in 2009 since when they have worked with designers such as PPQ and Jean Charles de Castelbajac before deciding to launch their own collection.

Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy S/S 2012 by Ellie Sutton
Fanny and Jessy S/S 2012 by Ellie Sutton.

The Fanny and Jessy S/S 2012 collection featured a strong cowboy influenced aesthetic, translated into a simple colour palette of cream, tomato red, beige and sea green. Pleated wide leg trousers and pencil skirts were worn beneath fringed jackets, with the occasional fringed face covering making an intriguing appearance. Flaps were a central theme throughout, appearing as bibs on tops and as exaggerated detailing on waists. A backless top followed one of the key trends this season, and delightful red suede platforms were worn with large gauge knitted ankle socks. A loose oversized backpack provided a nicely utilitarian feel.

Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
fanny and jessy S/S 2012 by Lisa Stannard
Fanny and Jessy S/S 2012 by Lisa Stannard.

Two wonderfully delicate print designs by illustrator Lynnie Zulu were used throughout the collection. On a matching trouser suit the symmetrical print, which looked like tribal faces, was featured across the shoulder flap and pocket detailing of a cowboy shirt. A swirling feathered design was repeated on shorts, a shirt dress and a flapping waxed fabric kagoule. I recommend you take a peek at Lynnie Zulu‘s website as it features some fabulous stuff.

Fanny and Jessy S/S 2012 by Rachel Higham
Fanny and Jessy S/S 2012 by Rachel Higham.

Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy S/S 2012. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

This was a wonderfully original yet wearable collection from a pair of designers to watch. Keep your eyes on Fanny and Jessy.

Categories ,Blow PR, ,Blow Presents, ,Cowboy, ,Diela Maharanie, ,Ellie Sutton, ,Fanny and Jessy, ,Fringing, ,Jean-Charles de Castelbajac, ,Jessie J, ,Lady Gaga, ,Lisa Stannard, ,London College of Fashion, ,LSO St Luke’s, ,Lynnie Zulu, ,ppq, ,print, ,Rachel Higham, ,Saint Saviour, ,somerset, ,The Kings Collection

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Blow Presents Jane Bowler

Jane Bowler S/S 2012 by Ellie Sutton
Jane Bowler S/S 2012 by Ellie Sutton.

Jane Bowler is a graduate of the Royal College of Art who works in innovative ways with inexpensive and mundane materials, store and she was the first designer to show at the Blow Presents showcase at London Fashion Week. For her S/S 2012 collection she worked in collaboration with knitwear designers Heather Orr, what is ed Victoria Campbell and Victoria Bulmer to create a stunning group of garments inspired by the story of Icarus. Using plastic and latex with soft block-coloured knitted tops and laddered leggings beneath, sale the collection was fearless and fun.

Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler S/S 2012 by Scarlett Tierney
Jane Bowler S/S 2012 by Scarlett Tierney.

Clothing featured fabulous swishing tassels, curled feather like patterns and tufts of feathers in translucent rainbow hues. Sunglasses came with cute coloured eyebrows attached like question marks, a collaboration with Studio Swine. Tight swimming cap hats and high t-bar platforms were also accessorised with rampant plastic additions, and as the show reached a crescendo we were treated to the most fully feathered piece of all: a huge cape worn by a delightfully curvaceous model.

Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane-bowler-SS12-by-Lisa-Stannard
Jane Bowler S/S 2012 by Lisa Stannard.

I loved the unabashed boldness of this thoroughly unique collection, which amongst the more fantastical elements featured some highly wearable pieces. I look forward to seeing what Jane Bowler does next.

Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler S/S 2012 review. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

YouTube Preview Image

Categories ,Blow PR, ,Blow Presents, ,Ellie Sutton, ,Feathers, ,Heather Orr, ,Icarus, ,Jane Bowler, ,knitwear, ,Latex, ,Lisa Stannard, ,LSO St Luke’s, ,Plastic, ,platforms, ,rainbow, ,Royal College of Art, ,Scarlett Tierney, ,Studio Swine, ,Sunglasses, ,Tassels, ,Translucent, ,Victoria Bulmer, ,Victoria Campbell

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Fyodor Golan (by Amelia)


Illustration by Gemma Sheldrake

It’s always a treat to see a brand new designer launch at London Fashion Week – there’s always one that you get tickets for and have never heard of but really stand out in a sea of similarity. This season, clinic it was Fyodor Golan.

Fyodor Podgorny and Golan Frydman make up this design duo – and this debut collection, there romantically titled ‘Pagan Poetry’ was a real treat.

Sarcasm alert: I do rather enjoy sitting on the front row with somebody who is so desperate to capture what they are seeing with a Blackberry or video camera that they lean forward so much that they obscure the view for everybody behind them. I’ve had this a lot this fashion week – I guess it’s inevitable, with the internet now saturated with fashion blogs, it’s only a matter of time before almost everybody has a decent camera and is trying to capture the action as it happens. I’ve heard stories of people taking photographs with one hand and Tweeting with the other. When will it end?! This guy I was sitting next to at Fyodor Golan was beyond ridiculous. Armed with a teeny tiny video camera, he moved backwards and forwards like he directing a Hollywood blockbuster. I jabbed him a couple of times, with a helpless ‘PLEASE STOP DOING THAT!’ look on my face. It didn’t make the slightest difference. He continued to capture, with his shakey hand, every detail of every look. Gah.

Despite this monster I was determined to capture good photographs of this stunning collection. The inspiration had come from Renaissance and Regency periods, and with heritage in Latvia, Russia, Israel, Morocco and Germany, Fyodor and Golan certainly have a enormous amount of cultural references to draw from.

Long, elegant silhouettes dominated the catwalk, spiced up with ruched details and voluminous elements. High waisted skirts were teamed with cropped bolero jackets with flamboyant layering to start with, extremely wearable and somehow classic and contemporary at the same time. Contrasting textures such as organza and cotton were married together in geometric patterns.


Illustration by Ella Masters

Futuristic tailoring appeared on floor length jersey skirts – intricate panels had been applied to waists, and hems were elasticised which allowed models to swagger intently.

The collection then took a very dramatic turn with some amazing conceptual pieces that had everybody raising their cameras in unison. Architectural frocks made in leather and goat skin appeared – one dramatic piece featuring a short, short skirt with layered pleats, another floor length where the leather had been treated to look organic and made the model move like an animal. Other pieces saw organza take twists and turns around models’ figures in muted lilac and beige, having an exotic, romantic flavour. There was so much going on here, but for the final walk-through, somehow it all seemed to fuse together perfectly.

Idiot With Video Camera continued to capture every piece in motion, much to my dismay. I saw him on the Frow a few times during the course of the week. He’s probably really famous, and I’ll never work again. But he drove me insane! And the end of the show, he’d dropped his mobile on the floor. Being a kind and considerate individual, I returned it to him as he legged it out of the venue. ‘Thanks!’ he said, ‘And sorry if I got in your way before!’ ‘Yes, you did!’ I barked, ‘…but I’m over it now.’ He offered me some pictures from his ‘official photographer’ but I declined. I think I did okay – it’s not difficult to take good pictures of great clothes.


Illustration by Gemma Sheldrake

It’s always a treat to see a brand new designer launch at London Fashion Week – there’s always one that you get tickets for and have never heard of but really stand out in a sea of similarity. This season, ask it was Fyodor Golan.

Fyodor Podgorny and Golan Frydman make up this design duo – and this debut collection, romantically titled ‘Pagan Poetry’ was a real treat.

Sarcasm alert: I do rather enjoy sitting on the front row with somebody who is so desperate to capture what they are seeing with a Blackberry or video camera that they lean forward so much that they obscure the view for everybody behind them. I’ve had this a lot this fashion week – I guess it’s inevitable, with the internet now saturated with fashion blogs, it’s only a matter of time before almost everybody has a decent camera and is trying to capture the action as it happens. I’ve heard stories of people taking photographs with one hand and Tweeting with the other. When will it end?! This guy I was sitting next to at Fyodor Golan was beyond ridiculous. Armed with a teeny tiny video camera, he moved backwards and forwards like he directing a Hollywood blockbuster. I jabbed him a couple of times, with a helpless ‘PLEASE STOP DOING THAT!’ look on my face. It didn’t make the slightest difference. He continued to capture, with his shakey hand, every detail of every look. Gah.


Illustration by Abi Daker

Despite this monster I was determined to capture good photographs of this stunning collection. The inspiration had come from Renaissance and Regency periods, and with heritage in Latvia, Russia, Israel, Morocco and Germany, Fyodor and Golan certainly have a enormous amount of cultural references to draw from.

Long, elegant silhouettes dominated the catwalk, spiced up with ruched details and voluminous elements. High waisted skirts were teamed with cropped bolero jackets with flamboyant layering to start with, extremely wearable and somehow classic and contemporary at the same time. Contrasting textures such as organza and cotton were married together in geometric patterns.


Illustration by Ella Masters

Futuristic tailoring appeared on floor length jersey skirts – intricate panels had been applied to waists, and hems were elasticised which allowed models to swagger intently.

The collection then took a very dramatic turn with some amazing conceptual pieces that had everybody raising their cameras in unison. Architectural frocks made in leather and goat skin appeared – one dramatic piece featuring a short, short skirt with layered pleats, another floor length where the leather had been treated to look organic and made the model move like an animal. Other pieces saw organza take twists and turns around models’ figures in muted lilac and beige, having an exotic, romantic flavour. There was so much going on here, but for the final walk-through, somehow it all seemed to fuse together perfectly.

Idiot With Video Camera continued to capture every piece in motion, much to my dismay. I saw him on the Frow a few times during the course of the week. He’s probably really famous, and I’ll never work again. But he drove me insane! And the end of the show, he’d dropped his mobile on the floor. Being a kind and considerate individual, I returned it to him as he legged it out of the venue. ‘Thanks!’ he said, ‘And sorry if I got in your way before!’ ‘Yes, you did!’ I barked, ‘…but I’m over it now.’ He offered me some pictures from his ‘official photographer’ but I declined. I think I did okay – it’s not difficult to take good pictures of great clothes.


Illustration by Gemma Sheldrake

It’s always a treat to see a brand new designer launch at London Fashion Week – there’s always one that you get tickets for and have never heard of but really stand out in a sea of similarity. This season, price it was Fyodor Golan.

Fyodor Podgorny and Golan Frydman make up this design duo – and this debut collection, see romantically titled ‘Pagan Poetry’ was a real treat.

Sarcasm alert: I do rather enjoy sitting on the front row with somebody who is so desperate to capture what they are seeing with a Blackberry or video camera that they lean forward so much that they obscure the view for everybody behind them. I’ve had this a lot this fashion week – I guess it’s inevitable, medicine with the internet now saturated with fashion blogs, it’s only a matter of time before almost everybody has a decent camera and is trying to capture the action as it happens. I’ve heard stories of people taking photographs with one hand and Tweeting with the other. When will it end?! This guy I was sitting next to at Fyodor Golan was beyond ridiculous. Armed with a teeny tiny video camera, he moved backwards and forwards like he was directing a Hollywood blockbuster. I jabbed him a couple of times, with a helpless ‘PLEASE STOP DOING THAT!’ look on my face. It didn’t make the slightest difference. He continued to capture, with his shakey hand, every detail of every look. Gah.


Illustration by Abi Daker

Despite this monster I was determined to capture good photographs of this stunning collection. The inspiration had come from Renaissance and Regency periods, and with heritage in Latvia, Russia, Israel, Morocco and Germany, Fyodor and Golan certainly have a enormous amount of cultural references to draw from.

Long, elegant silhouettes dominated the catwalk, spiced up with ruched details and voluminous elements. High waisted skirts were teamed with cropped bolero jackets with flamboyant layering to start with, extremely wearable and somehow classic and contemporary at the same time. Contrasting textures such as organza and cotton were married together in geometric patterns.


Illustration by Ella Masters

Futuristic tailoring appeared on floor length jersey skirts – intricate panels had been applied to waists, and hems were elasticised which allowed models to swagger intently.

The collection then took a very dramatic turn with some amazing conceptual pieces that had everybody raising their cameras in unison. Architectural frocks made in leather and goat skin appeared – one dramatic piece featuring a short, short skirt with layered pleats, another floor length where the leather had been treated to look organic and made the model move like an animal. Other pieces saw organza take twists and turns around models’ figures in muted lilac and beige, having an exotic, romantic flavour. There was so much going on here, but for the final walk-through, somehow it all seemed to fuse together perfectly.

Idiot With Video Camera continued to capture every piece in motion, much to my dismay. I saw him on the Frow a few times during the course of the week. He’s probably really famous, and I’ll never work again. But he drove me insane! And the end of the show, he’d dropped his mobile on the floor. Being a kind and considerate individual, I returned it to him as he legged it out of the venue. ‘Thanks!’ he said, ‘And sorry if I got in your way before!’ ‘Yes, you did!’ I barked, ‘…but I’m over it now.’ He offered me some pictures from his ‘official photographer’ but I declined. I think I did okay – it’s not difficult to take good pictures of great clothes.

Fyodor Golan A/W 2011 by Joy Chokchai
Fyodor Golan A/W 2011 by Joy Chokchai.

I love heading into a show at LFW when I have absolutely no idea what to expect – anything showing at Fashion Scout and PR-ed by Trace Publicity is almost certainly going to be of a high calibre, viagra buy as was the case with newcomers, malady the intriguingly named Fyodor Golan.

Fyodor Golan A/W 2011 by Sandra Contreras
Fyodor Golan A/W 2011 by Sandra Contreras.

Fyodor Podgorny and Golan Frydman surely have the most FABULOUS names in fashion. This endearing couple (they held hands when they came out for a bow) are emblematic of the mash up of cultures and nationalities that constitutes London a decade into the new millennium. Between them they have Latvian, generic Russian, Israeli, Moroccan and German roots but got together here in my hometown of Londinium. Between them they have worked at Alexander McQueen, Raf Simons, Richard Nichol and Issey Miyake – in other words a top selection of fashion designers – and these skills were put to good effect in Pagan Poetry, their first catwalk show.

Fyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011 by Sandra Contreras
Fyodor Golan A/W 2011 by Sandra Contreras.

The result was a super confident collection inspired by the dress of Regency and Renaissance periods and the scarification rituals of tribal cultures. In practice this meant lots of sheer dresses, cut away areas on the waist, sexy exposed backs and highly tooled ridged and bumped leather detailing. Some of the staggered draping reminded me of Masha Ma, seen at it’s most extreme in a powder blue hooded cape on top of a textured see through bodysuit. Backless dresses are big for A/W and one of my favourite Fyodor Golan dresses featured teasingly buckled straps beneath a thick swinging plait. Very sexy.

Fyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan By Lisa Stannard
Fyodor Golan by Lisa Stannard.

A couple of the tighter dresses featured one of the season’s more worrying trends: extremely tight gathered hems which forced the model to move with great care down the catwalk – I’m sure clothing psychologists would have a field day with the meaning behind this latest design feature. The show closed with a deep royal blue dress featuring this season’s favourite red carpet touch: a lengthy train of fabric billowing out behind. I look forward to seeing what this multi cultural twosome produce next.

Fyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan By Lisa Stannard
Fyodor Golan by Lisa Stannard.

You can read Matt Bramford’s rather more amusing blog about this show and the trials and tribulations of sitting next to an *annoying person who leans out to capture every single look on their shitty camera* right here. Oh how I empathise – I had my fair share of camera wielding cretins to cope with over LFW (see above, at this very show). I could see Matt helplessly trying to shoot round his one at the far end of the catwalk and you can probably spot the culprit from the front if you look through my own photos. GRRRRRR.

Fyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryFyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Fyodor Golan A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can see more work by Lisa Stannard in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Fashion Scout, ,Fyodor Golan, ,Fyodor Podgorny, ,Golan Frydman, ,Joy Chokchai, ,lfw, ,Lisa Stannard, ,London Fashion Week, ,Masha Ma, ,Matt Bramford, ,Sandra Contreras, ,Trace Publicity

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Olivia Rubin

Tosha by Rebecca Strickson

Danielle Lloyd and Konnie Huq, purchase illustrated by Lisa Stannard

Olivia Rubin’s show was to be held at Jalouse in Hanover Square – a place I’d hear of but never actually ventured in to. It was to be my last womenswear show (although I didn’t know it at the time, ed such is life!) and after a long, grueling day I needed a big drink. Luckily, these were on hand.

Outside, glamorous ladies and gents queued to get in, all throwing their tickets into the air, shouting the names of their publications or various relationships with Olivia. When I finally got inside, the Only Way is Essex girl group Lola were being ravished by a pack of pervy photographers screaming their names. To my left was Danielle Lloyd, an intriguing shade of orange; to my right, Jason Gardiner sat in a booth surrounded by a harem of orange honeyz. Konnie Huq was there. What the hell was going on? I was completely baffled. We’d featured Olivia in the past – I adored her artists-inspired collection, but I had no idea she had such an, erm, orange following.


Illustration by Fritha Strickland

There were no seats available – the show was to take place on a precarious plinth around the main area of the club, with guests littered around the plinth in sunken seats. I positioned myself by a wall and necked a cocktail. Whilst waiting for the show to start, I Twittered and checked my emails, slightly aware of somebody standing next to me but not looking up to notice. Hilariously, it was contributor Lauren, who had been stood there for a good ten minutes without either of us realising. This is the kind of thing that happens to your brain during fashion week. I could have been stood next to Naomi Campbell and wouldn’t have noticed (not that Lauren isn’t gorgeous herself).


Illustration by Michelle Urval Nyrén

The show began to rapturous applause, with the first model coming out from behind a make-shift backstage area right behind where I was standing. It was difficult to know where to look, and I missed the first few outfits due to glaring at the audience and being mesmerised by Jalouse’s crystal ceiling.

Olivia has quickly risen up the fashion ranks with her playful, vibrant prints using a whole load of inspiration. This time was no exception – brick patterns, speech bubbles, floral prints on silk and animal prints were all on display under the glittery lights. The shapes and cuts seemed a little more sophisticated this time around – Olivia’s staple playful dresses were still there in vibrant colours, but the addition of figure-hugging jersey tops and cropped trousers added a new, demure look. Lace details had been added to some pieces, sexing them up a little. Jersey and silks had been married for great effect. Sexy translucent shirts worn over lace underwear add even more kink to this fab collection.


Illustration by Jaymie O’Callaghan


Illustration by Madi Illustrates


Illustration by Maria Papadimitriou

Many of the pieces featured wrap-around details that flatter the figure – not that any of these hot models needed any flattering, but I imagine that sweeping necklines and pinched waists can be pulled off by even the most Rubenesque figure. Longer, almost floor-length numbers with vibrant graphic patterns closed the show – the final walkthrough leaving me on edge as these glamorous girls in vertiginous heels swaggered around the raised plinth.


One of the Only Way Is Essex birds, illustrated by Lisa Stannard

After the show, me and Amelia enjoyed a cocktail or two and had a bit of a gossip, keeping one eye on the attendees. We stood near the official photo point, me with my camera around my neck – one of the guests asked if I could take her picture. She didn’t ask why I was taking pictures or which publication I was from, she just wanted her photograph taken. Well, why not? Here she is – I hope she sees it (and likes it, obv).

All photography by Matt Bramford

See more of Lisa and Michelle’s illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,catwalk, ,Danielle Lloyd, ,Fritha Strickland, ,Hanover Square, ,Jalouse, ,Jason Gardiner, ,Jaymie O’Callaghan, ,Konnie Huq, ,Lisa Stannard, ,Lola, ,london, ,London Fashion Week, ,Madi Illustrates, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Michelle Urvall Nyrén, ,Olivia Rubin, ,Orange, ,print, ,review, ,Tan, ,The Only Way is Essex, ,Womenswear

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