Amelia’s Magazine | Secret Garden Party 2010: Stylish Headwear Photo Gallery

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
SGP 2010- headdress by Amelia Gregory

On my rambles around festivals this year it has been hard to escape the omnipresence of floral head garlands on the ladies, viagra and indeed worn by some of the more daring men… I recall a particularly dashing pair of matching flower topped bald male bonces espied through the crowd in the Cabaret Arena at Latitude for instance.

At Glastonbury and Latitude these garlands were usually bought off the peg at a stall, about it but Gardeners (as they are called) at Secret Garden Party were a little more inventive with their head gear. From customised top hats to Indian feather headdresses to stuffed birds, recipe decorative headwear provided ample opportunity for experiment in colour, combination and height.

Here are some of the most inventive and appealing creations I saw at Secret Garden Party.

Photography by Amelia Gregory.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
I loved this creation – the height, the space, the use of colour. Beautiful.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
This girl had used her own hair to create ears.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Gorgeous butterflies. Simple but effective.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Bees. Leaves. Flowers. Stuffed animals. Pile em on!

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
This girl had found loads of crap in her house and stuck it all on, including a Sheriff’s badge, handcuffs and a Toucan (just visible on the top)

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A boy with a stuffed bird in his ‘fro. As you do.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A huge holographic rainbow butterfly headdress.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Native American Indian inspired headdresses were very popular.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
My friend Dora does a simple red top hat extremely well.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A little molecular number.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Channelling Louix XVI via Burlesque.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Sometimes more is more, don’t you find?

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Jemima with a found thistle and fake flowers.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Classy, and strangely inaccurate too.

SGP 2010-Pearl and Ivy headdress by Amelia Gregory
Lastly, Pearl and Ivy, or should that be Carly and Sam, here seen modelling their own creations which were for sale at Secret Garden Party.

SGP 2010-Pearl and Ivy headdress Amelia Gregory
And myself wearing one – c’mon, I had to get into the spirit of it all didn’t I?! You can buy a similar feather headdress from Pearl and Ivy from their online website.

Categories ,Cabaret Arena, ,Feathers, ,glastonbury, ,hats, ,Headdresses, ,Headwear, ,Latitude Festival, ,Native American, ,Pearl and Ivy, ,Secret Garden Party

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Amelia’s Magazine | Secret Garden Party 2010: Stylish Headwear Photo Gallery

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
SGP 2010- headdress by Amelia Gregory

On my rambles around festivals this year it has been hard to escape the omnipresence of floral head garlands on the ladies, viagra and indeed worn by some of the more daring men… I recall a particularly dashing pair of matching flower topped bald male bonces espied through the crowd in the Cabaret Arena at Latitude for instance.

At Glastonbury and Latitude these garlands were usually bought off the peg at a stall, about it but Gardeners (as they are called) at Secret Garden Party were a little more inventive with their head gear. From customised top hats to Indian feather headdresses to stuffed birds, recipe decorative headwear provided ample opportunity for experiment in colour, combination and height.

Here are some of the most inventive and appealing creations I saw at Secret Garden Party.

Photography by Amelia Gregory.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
I loved this creation – the height, the space, the use of colour. Beautiful.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
This girl had used her own hair to create ears.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Gorgeous butterflies. Simple but effective.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Bees. Leaves. Flowers. Stuffed animals. Pile em on!

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
This girl had found loads of crap in her house and stuck it all on, including a Sheriff’s badge, handcuffs and a Toucan (just visible on the top)

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A boy with a stuffed bird in his ‘fro. As you do.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A huge holographic rainbow butterfly headdress.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Native American Indian inspired headdresses were very popular.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
My friend Dora does a simple red top hat extremely well.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
A little molecular number.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Channelling Louix XVI via Burlesque.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Sometimes more is more, don’t you find?

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Jemima with a found thistle and fake flowers.

SGP 2010-headdress by Amelia Gregory
Classy, and strangely inaccurate too.

SGP 2010-Pearl and Ivy headdress by Amelia Gregory
Lastly, Pearl and Ivy, or should that be Carly and Sam, here seen modelling their own creations which were for sale at Secret Garden Party.

SGP 2010-Pearl and Ivy headdress Amelia Gregory
And myself wearing one – c’mon, I had to get into the spirit of it all didn’t I?! You can buy a similar feather headdress from Pearl and Ivy from their online website.

Categories ,Cabaret Arena, ,Feathers, ,glastonbury, ,hats, ,Headdresses, ,Headwear, ,Latitude Festival, ,Native American, ,Pearl and Ivy, ,Secret Garden Party

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Amelia’s Magazine | Latitude Festival 2010: Waterfront Graduate Fashion Shows Preview

A while back I happened to catch a performance by Lissie at the Old Queens Head in Angel. I hadn’t planned on watching her – truth be told, more about healing I was there to check out the band before her ; but my curiosity was piqued as I watched the room fill up with an expectant and excited audience, rx all craning their necks and standing on their tippy toes to get a better view of the girl serenading us. It’s been a while since I saw someone so captivating. Golden haired, this site freckled and just a slip of a thing, Lissie entranced the room who in turn treated her to a hushed and reverential silence, punctuated only by bursts of spirited applause and cheers. I watched the audience watching her. Everyone seemed transported out of their location; away from the top room of a pub on grimy old Essex Road and into the world that Mid-Western native come Californian girl Lissie inhabits, laced with the scent of orange blossom, filled with wide open skies, winding rivers and smokey mountains, and night-times spent on porches with nothing but a guitar, a couple of beers and a pack of Marlboro Reds . No wonder we were all captivated.

A couple of weeks later, I got to meet the busy Lissie. In the time between, Lissie had appeared on Jools Holland, toured around Europe, duetted with Ellie Goulding at The Great Escape, and graced the airwaves, all in the name of the hectic promotion of her debut album, Catching a Tiger (hot on the heels of the release of last years Why You Runnin’ EP). The phrase ‘riding a juggernaut’ comes to mind with Lissie; bursting into our consciousness with the brightest of starts. The day we met was a rare moment of down time; her touring schedule is in a constant state of flux – stretching to accommodate gigs that are being added on a daily basis, and Lissie had only just made it back from the previous nights gigs in Manchester and Newcastle. Curled up wearing her newest acquisition – a red jacket with white piping brought from a charity shop up North which made her look, she remarked cheerily, like “Santa Claus”, she lamented the ever decreasing amount of free time but was laughingly quick to note that it’s “a quality problem- it’s only busy because it’s going well, if no-one liked the music then there wouldn’t be things for me to do!” As Amelia’s Magazine is nothing if not versatile in its roles, I was happy to take on the guise of English Tourist Board representative, and suggest a list of places to visit when she finally gets a day off; though when that day will be, we will never know! ( FYI, Lissie was especially keen on the visit to Hampton Court Palace idea). As she munched on a healthy beetroot salad – my lunch advice was a visit to Mr Jerk in Soho for some fattening salt fish patties; probably best that not all of my suggestions get listened to) – I decided to find out just where this spirited… got her start in life.

I always loved to sing, I was a pretty outspoken, strong willed little kid! I got a little shyer and more introverted when I got older but as a kid I used to stomp my feet when I walked (swings arms in a very determined manner), I was always talkin’… My family were really sweet and encouraging, but at school I would get into a lot of trouble because I would talk back, I always knew what was best for me, and when other people used to tell me what was best for me, I would be like “uh oh! Not gonna do it!” (laughs) I loved to sing, so becoming a songwriter was a great way for me to express my feelings, you know. I wasn’t always great at talking about things, and so I could write these little melodies…. even as a little kid, I would sing my feelings. I sang to my sister; I do recall tape recording this mean song about her, and leaving a tape recorder about her under her bedroom door and then pressing play and running away! (laughs) And then in high school I went through my phase of being more introverted – I pierced my nose, got a tattoo, started smoking,….I did my own thing cause I didn’t really fit in to any particular group. I started writing music, taught myself guitar and then started working at this coffee shop where I could play.

What type of music were you listening to then?
Music wise, when I was younger I was into folk, Americana, musical theatre, and then in high school I was into country and gangsta rap

Those are two very different genres!
You wouldn’t think that these are similar in any way, but when you listen to either country or rap, it’s people telling their story. Indie rock can be more obtuse or obscure. Country and rap is some one speaking in the first person, you know? It’s more like, “this is my story, this is my experience.”

Do you respond to music that is more heartfelt and honest?
Totally, but I like all kinds of stuff. Although I don’t really listen to music to get inspired for my own music.

Did you move to California immediately after high school?
First I went to Colorado, to go to study at Colorado State. I was playing music and sang with a DJ there, and he ended up getting our song placed on tv shows. That was a catalyst for me; I realised that I could make a living making music, maybe eventually a good living! And then I went and did a semester of school (our version of uni) in Paris. I was singing there as well; I met a woman who helped me get shows in bars, and I also got some stuff played on college radio. After that I dropped out of school, and moved to LA – only cause I figured that that’s where you go when you want to be a singer!

Comparisons have been made to the hazy and bohemian rock n’ roll that came out of Laurel Canyon in the 70′s (think Joni Mitchell, The Doors, and Stevie Nicks). Lissie’s 2010 version is honed from living in an area not more than a mile or two away; Beechwood Canyon, a creative hub of artists and musicians and a world away from the plastic glamour and sheen of Beverly Hills. Los Angeles is known for chewing up and spitting up many a wide eyed starlet and ingenue, but strong-willed Lissie was never going to be one of the victims….
I don’t know if it’s me being stubborn, or being from the Mid West, but….I’m not bullshit, I don’t want bullshit in my life. I’m still nice, you know? I was never tempted by (the LA madness.) I always knew what I wanted to do. And I wasn’t immediately successful… I had figured that by 22 I was gonna make a record, and I didn’t make one till I was 26. But I was never like “I’m never going to be successful, maybe I need to be skinnier, or prettier, or I need to start doing drugs!

A year ago (while dealing with the messy end of a relationship) Lissie made a decision – part gut instinct, part cosmic order – to leave LA and head north to the tranquil town of Ojai, a place that she had never even stepped foot in…

Do you get inspired by the peace of Ojai?
Unfortunately i was more inspired to write when I was in Hollywood, because there was more more me to get worked up about. (sighs) There was this guy that I dated…… we broke up and our breakup process was drawn out and painful, which gave me a lot of material (laughs). Part of the reason why I moved was because it felt like my family was broken, and I needed a change. I put it out there; I was on a plane coming back from Tennessee and…. sometimes I just say what I want, and try to have faith that it will happen, and this is the weird thing; I found myself sitting next to two people who lived in Ojai, and I told them that I was heading back to LA, and they suggested I visit Ojai. So I got back to LA and instantly knew that I couldn’t be there; there was something in me that said “you have to move to Ojai, even though I had never been there before!” I went online, and found this house that cost less than my apartment in LA . I put down a deposit and moved, gone! And it was the best thing for me. I totally healed my heart there, and got myself in a position where I could really focus on myself, and what I need to do. I live alone, with my dog, I go for walks. And I make a ton of pie! (laughs)

So you have a summer of touring in England?
Yeah, every day we get a revised schedule. We’re (Lissie and her band) doing festivals for the next few months, and in October, November and December there will be at least one thing a month going on in England, so it’s unclear whether we will just stay here or start our momentum in the States, ’cause I still have to go promote my album over there. I don’t exactly know what’s going to be happening, but it’s all good.

Dee-Andrews-Bethan-Smith
Bethan Smith by Dee Andrews.

This year, thumb for the first time, Latitude Festival will be hosting repeat runs of the graduate fashion shows from Central Saint Martins and Chelsea College of Art and Design: lovingly reproduced on a special catwalk by the lake near the Waterfront Stage.

Don’t miss this opportunity to catch some of the best up and coming fashion designers showcasing their work in such a wonderful setting, so very far from the usual hubbub associated with urban fashion shows.

Of course I couldn’t resist putting a sneak preview of the best designers out to a host of illustrators…

Central Saint Martins

Abi Daker - Sorcha O'Raghallaigh
Sorcha O’Raghallaigh by Abigail Daker.

Check the amazing chiffon head-dressed swirling layers from Sorcha O’Raghallaigh, all based on the film Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. We particularly loved Sorcha‘s stuff in this previous blog post.

Zoe-Sherwood-lisa stannard
Zoe Sherwood by Lisa Stannard.

or fabulous feathers and dip dyeing from Zoe Sherwood – all based on the different stages of a bird in flight

Dee-Andrews-Anne-Karine-Thorbjoernsen
Dee-Andrews-Anne-Karine-Thorbjoernsen
Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen by Dee Andrews.

or how about Russian Constructivist theory transferred into stunning spiked dresses courtesy of Anne Karine Thorbjoersen?

yuann-shen-felipe rojas-llanos
Felipe Rojas Llanos by Yuann Shen.

not to mention the couture influenced pod shaped menswear from Felipe Rojas Llanos

and from Chelsea College of Art and Design

Dee-Andrews-Bethan-Smith
Bethan Smith by Dee Andrews.

Look out especially for sculptural textiles from Bethan Smith, inspired by Native American ceremonial dress

bethparry_rachelclareprice
Beth Parry by Rachel Clare Price.

twisted knitwear from Beth Parry

Lauren-T-Franks-by-Barbara Ana Gomez
Lauren T-Franks by Barbara Ana Gomez.

contemporary folklore from Lauren T-Franks

Abi Daker - Sophie Parker
Sophie Parker by Abigail Daker.

wide-checked pants and quilted capes from Sophie Parker

donna.mckenzie.nichola.orchard
donna.mckenzie.nichola.orchard
Nichola Orchard by Donna McKenzie.

ruffled and bumped accessories inspired by skin and mountain ranges from Nichola Orchard

ELLEN-CHATELAIN-by-Lisa-Stannard
Ellen Chatelain by Lisa Stannard.

knitted patchwork stripey jumpsuits inspired by 1960s science fiction from Ellen Chatelain

Sine-Skau-Shawana-Grosvenor.jpg
Shawana Grosvenor by Sine Skau.

and creamy circular tailoring from Shawana Grosvenor.

Models will be provided by Elite, which might well excite the man in your life… and this major model agency will also be scouting the festival for the next big thing. Ooo-eeeee. Will you be down by the lakeside this weekend?

Categories ,Abigail Daker, ,Anne Karine Thorbjoersen, ,Barbara Ana Gomez, ,Beth Parry, ,Bethan Smith, ,catwalk, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Chelsea College of Art and Design, ,Dee Andrews, ,Donna McKenzie, ,Elite Models, ,Ellen Chatelain, ,Fashion Show, ,Felipe Rojas Llanos, ,Graduate Show, ,Latitude Festival, ,Lauren T-Franks, ,Lisa Stannard, ,models, ,Nichola Orchard, ,Rachel Clare Price, ,Russian Constructivism, ,Shawana Grosvenor, ,Sine Skau, ,Sophie Parker, ,Sorcha O’Raghallaigh, ,Waterfront Stage, ,Yuann Shen, ,Zoe Sherwood

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Amelia’s Magazine | Latitude 2010: Central Saint Martins Catwalk Review

Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia gregory
Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.

I nestled in rushes amongst the clacking grasshoppers and giggling tweenies to watch the Latitude graduate fashion shows, what is ed played out along a catwalk linked to the Waterfront Stage. A selection of new faces from Elite formed a somewhat confusing parade between two stop offs on either side of the lake, not helped by a complete lack of clarity in announcements of each designer – What follows is the best of what I managed to catch, so if I’ve got any wrong please do let me know.

Latitude 2010-kids Amelia gregory
Latitude 2010-happy teen by Amelia Gregory
Photography by Amelia Gregory.

First up came the students from Chelsea College of Art and Design:

Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Ellen Chatelain didn’t disappoint with her patchwork knitwear.

Latitude 2010-Sorcha Herbert by Amelia Gregory
More colourful knitwear, or is it weave, from Sorcha Herbert?

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Gorgeous printed textiles by Charmaine Dresser worked perfectly shooting into the sun.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Spectacular lasercut tailoring.

Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Ruched swimwear in mustard and greens. Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyrén.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
More patchworked style.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Subtle tones of caramel and slate.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Padded and stitched capes combined with strange animal and psychedelic prints.

Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.

Sadly the wonderful creations of Bethan Smith never crossed the lake – I guess the models were worried they might fall in. Fair play.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory

More monochrome geometrics and slate shades from Helen Lawrence.

Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
For Shawana Grosvenor creamy circular layers rule.

Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia Gregory
Tagged onto the end of the first half Matthew Inett reprised his 2008 London College of Fashion catwalk show, which featured almighty curved shoulders and exaggerated hips in pastel checks.
Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.

I nestled in rushes amongst the clacking grasshoppers and giggling tweenies to watch the Latitude graduate fashion shows, seek played out along a catwalk linked to the Waterfront Stage. A selection of new faces from Elite formed a somewhat confusing parade between two stop offs on either side of the lake, story not helped by a complete lack of clarity in announcements of each designer – What follows is the best of what I managed to catch, so if I’ve got any wrong please do let me know.

Latitude 2010-kids Amelia gregory
Latitude 2010-happy teen by Amelia Gregory
Photography by Amelia Gregory.

First up came the students from Chelsea College of Art and Design:

Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Ellen Chatelain didn’t disappoint with her patchwork knitwear.

Latitude 2010-Sorcha Herbert by Amelia Gregory
More colourful knitwear, or is it weave, from Sorcha Herbert?

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Gorgeous printed textiles by Charmaine Dresser worked perfectly shooting into the sun.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Spectacular lasercut tailoring.

Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Ruched swimwear in mustard and greens. Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyrén.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
More patchworked style.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Subtle tones of caramel and slate.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Padded and stitched capes combined with strange animal and psychedelic prints.

Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.

Sadly the wonderful creations of Bethan Smith never crossed the lake – I guess the models were worried they might fall in. Fair play.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory

More monochrome geometrics and slate shades from Helen Lawrence.

Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
For Shawana Grosvenor creamy circular layers rule.

Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia gregory
Tagged onto the end of the first half Matthew Inett reprised his 2008 London College of Fashion catwalk show, which featured almighty curved shoulders and exaggerated hips in pastel checks.


Illustrations by Jenny Costello

With businesses struggling to survive through the recession armageddon, pilule a few innovative individuals are thriving, using their imagination and collaborations with other creatives to succeed. Sarah Bagner, or ‘Supermarket Sarah‘ transformed a wall of her own home into a window dresser’s dream; featuring both vintage finds and handmade creations from the likes of Donna Wilson. Inviting shoppers into her home for tea and cake has gained her such a following that Selfridges even invited her to curate a wall for them.


Supermarket Sarah, illustrated by Emma Block

Her latest collaboration is with the queens of cool, Tatty Devine, whose Brick Lane store has been transformed into an Aladdin’s cave of Sarah’s goodies. Tatty Devine is also famous for pioneering the collaborative spirit, teaming up with the likes of Rob Ryan, Charlie le Mindu and Mrs Jones to make their iconic statement jewellery ranges. Last night fellow creatives Fred Butler and Anna Murray were spinning some tunes on the decks, whilst cupcakes were supplied by Fifi and Lola.

I snapped Sarah wearing her Tatty Devine ‘Supermarket Sarah’ necklace in front of her wall which will soon be online here. The installation will be in store until the 16th August, alongside Tatty Devine’s regular stock which is currently on sale. This is your one stop shop for sorting your festival outfits; grab some neck candy from Tatty Devine and something from Sarah’s vintage dressing up box and you’re set! 

Photographs by Katie Antoniou

Central Saint Martins followed swiftly on from the Chelsea College of Art and Design’s graduate collections. Again, information pills lemme know if I’ve not credited your designs!

Latitude 2010-Central St Martins by Amelia Gregory
I loved the big fluffy creations of this designer. According to our previous blog these are by Helen Price, although she wasn’t listed on the line up. You see my difficulty? All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Felipe Rojas Llanos presented gorgeous blue and purple silk tailoring on pouty youths, a welcome diversion from the preceeding womenswear.

Latitude 2010-Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen by Amelia Gregory
Michelle Urvall Nyrén Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen
Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen by Michelle Urvall Nyrén.

Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen‘s spiked dresses and jackets were dramatically sensual and dangerous.

LatitudeCentral_AmyMartino
Illustration by Amy Martino.

Latitude 2010-fashion hat  by Amelia Gregory
Half hats, asymmetrical tailoring and shaggy Mr. Tumnus trousers.

Latitude 2010-Sabrina Bryntesson by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Sabrina Bryntesson by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Sabrina Bryntesson by Amelia Gregory
Fabulous curled entwined knitwear from Sabrina Bryntesson.

caroline-coates-Sabrina Bryntesson
Illustration by Caroline Coates.

Latitude 2010 Lee Brown by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010 Lee Brown by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010 Lee Brown by Amelia Gregory
Sports influenced tailoring from Lee Brown.

Latitude-Fashion-Show-by-Mina-Bach
Illustration by Mina Bach.

felice-perkins-Latitude fashion
Illustration by Felice Perkins.

Latitude 2010-Sorcha O’Raghallaigh by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Sorcha O’Raghallaigh by Amelia Gregory
The 80s influenced bulky layers shown by Sorcha O’Raghallaigh were eminently wearable, but the star of her collection was the stilt walker – I didn’t get a decent photo but you can check out the outfit on the homepage of her website.

felice-perkins-sorcha o'raghallaigh
Sorcha O’Raghallaigh by Felice Perkins.

Isabel Greenberg-Sorcha O’Raghallaigh
Sorcha O’Raghallaigh by Isabel Greenberg.

Latitude 2010-Zoe Sherwood by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Zoe Sherwood by Amelia Gregory
Sadly I only caught the best headdress from Zoe Sherwood‘s feathery collection from the back. However, if there’s one thing for sure Zoe does backs well, as this turquoise dress proves.

Latitude 2010-Zoe Sherwood by Amelia Gregory

The fashion shows were delightfully laid back, and enjoyed by plenty of families and young girls who would otherwise not get to see such calibre of upcoming design talent. Despite the lack of information about the presenting designers and the sometimes klutzy new models (Elite, you might want to give a few of them some catwalk training) this was a brilliant addition to Latitude, and with a bit of fine-tuning will hopefully become a festival staple.

Latitude fashion 2010-family fun by Amelia Gregory

Categories ,abina Bryntesson, ,Amy Martino, ,Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen, ,Caroline Coates, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Elite Models, ,Felice Perkins, ,Felipe Rojas Llanos, ,Helen Price, ,Isabel Greenberg, ,Latitude Festival, ,Lee Brown, ,Michelle Urvall Nyrén, ,Mina Bach., ,Mr. Tumnus, ,Sorcha O’Raghallaigh, ,Waterfront Stage S, ,Zoe Sherwood

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Amelia’s Magazine | Latitude 2010: Chelsea College of Art and Design Catwalk Review

Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.

On Friday afternoon I nestled in rushes amongst the clacking grasshoppers and giggling tweenies to watch the Latitude graduate fashion shows, order played out along a catwalk linked to the Waterfront Stage. A selection of new faces from Elite Models formed a somewhat confusing parade between two stop offs on either side of the lake, more about not helped by a complete lack of clarity in announcements of each designer – What follows is the best of what I managed to catch, so if I’ve got any wrong please or not labelled your designs at all do let me know. It was near on impossible to find out who was who. Ahem, lack of individual designer websites ahoy!
Luckily I have now found out all the right names, but really girls, you gotta get yourselves a much better presence on the web… it’s a mantra I seem to find myself repeating quite a lot.

Latitude 2010-kids Amelia gregory
Latitude 2010-happy teen by Amelia Gregory
Photography by Amelia Gregory.

First up came the students from Chelsea College of Art and Design:

Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Ellen Chatelain didn’t disappoint with her patchwork knitwear.

Abby-Wright-Latitude-Fashion Ellen Chatelain
Ellen Chatelain by Abby Wright.

Latitude 2010-Sorcha Herbert by Amelia Gregory
More colourful weave, from Sorcha Herbert.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Gorgeous printed textiles by Charmaine Dresser worked perfectly shooting into the sun.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Spectacular lasercut tailoring by Francesca Prudente.

Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Ruched swimwear in mustard and greens from Alice Powell. Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyrén.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
More patchworked style courtesy of Cat Finch.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Felicity McDonald-Bing does subtle tones of caramel and slate.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Padded and stitched capes combined with strange animal and psychedelic prints by Sophie Parker.

Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.
Sadly the wonderful creations of Bethan Smith never crossed the lake – I guess the models were worried they might fall in. Fair play.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Triangle wooden panels by Lauren T-Franks.

Latitude 2010-Helen Lawrence
More monochrome geometrics and slate shades from Helen Lawrence.

Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
For Shawana Grosvenor creamy circular layers rule.

Alexis-West-Latitude-Graduate-Fashion-Matthew Inett
Matthew Inett by Alexis West.

Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia gregory
Tagged onto the end of the first half Matthew Inett reprised his 2008 London College of Fashion catwalk show, which featured almighty curved shoulders and exaggerated hips in pastel checks.

Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Matthew Inett by Natasha Thompson.

Next up, my review of the Central Saint Martins show.

Categories ,Abby Wright, ,Alexis West, ,Alice Powell, ,Bethan Smith, ,Cat Finch, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Charmaine Dresser, ,Chelsea College of Art and Design, ,Elite Models, ,Felicity McDonald-Bing, ,Francesca Prudente, ,Graduate Fashion Show, ,Helen Lawrence, ,Krister Selin, ,Latitude Festival, ,Lauren T-Franks, ,London College of Fashion, ,Matthew Inett, ,Michelle Urvall Nyrén, ,Natasha Thompson, ,Shawana Grosvenor, ,Sophie Parker, ,Sorcha Herbert, ,Tweenies, ,Waterfront Stage

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Amelia’s Magazine | Latitude 2010: Chelsea College of Art and Design Catwalk Review

Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.

On Friday afternoon I nestled in rushes amongst the clacking grasshoppers and giggling tweenies to watch the Latitude graduate fashion shows, played out along a catwalk linked to the Waterfront Stage. A selection of new faces from Elite Models formed a somewhat confusing parade between two stop offs on either side of the lake, not helped by a complete lack of clarity in announcements of each designer – What follows is the best of what I managed to catch, so if I’ve got any wrong please or not labelled your designs at all do let me know. It was near on impossible to find out who was who. Ahem, lack of individual designer websites ahoy!
Luckily I have now found out all the right names, but really girls, you gotta get yourselves a much better presence on the web… it’s a mantra I seem to find myself repeating quite a lot.

Latitude 2010-kids Amelia gregory
Latitude 2010-happy teen by Amelia Gregory
Photography by Amelia Gregory.

First up came the students from Chelsea College of Art and Design:

Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Ellen Chatelain didn’t disappoint with her patchwork knitwear.

Abby-Wright-Latitude-Fashion Ellen Chatelain
Ellen Chatelain by Abby Wright.

Latitude 2010-Sorcha Herbert by Amelia Gregory
More colourful weave, from Sorcha Herbert.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Gorgeous printed textiles by Charmaine Dresser worked perfectly shooting into the sun.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Spectacular lasercut tailoring by Francesca Prudente.

Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Ruched swimwear in mustard and greens from Alice Powell. Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyrén.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
More patchworked style courtesy of Cat Finch.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Felicity McDonald-Bing does subtle tones of caramel and slate.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Padded and stitched capes combined with strange animal and psychedelic prints by Sophie Parker.

Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.
Sadly the wonderful creations of Bethan Smith never crossed the lake – I guess the models were worried they might fall in. Fair play.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Triangle wooden panels by Lauren T-Franks.

Latitude 2010-Helen Lawrence
More monochrome geometrics and slate shades from Helen Lawrence.

Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
For Shawana Grosvenor creamy circular layers rule.

Alexis-West-Latitude-Graduate-Fashion-Matthew Inett
Matthew Inett by Alexis West.

Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia gregory
Tagged onto the end of the first half Matthew Inett reprised his 2008 London College of Fashion catwalk show, which featured almighty curved shoulders and exaggerated hips in pastel checks.

Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Matthew Inett by Natasha Thompson.

Next up, my review of the Central Saint Martins show.



Categories ,Abby Wright, ,Alexis West, ,Alice Powell, ,Bethan Smith, ,Cat Finch, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Charmaine Dresser, ,Chelsea College of Art and Design, ,Elite Models, ,Felicity McDonald-Bing, ,Francesca Prudente, ,Graduate Fashion Show, ,Helen Lawrence, ,Krister Selin, ,Latitude Festival, ,Lauren T-Franks, ,London College of Fashion, ,Matthew Inett, ,Michelle Urvall Nyrén, ,Natasha Thompson, ,Shawana Grosvenor, ,Sophie Parker, ,Sorcha Herbert, ,Tweenies, ,Waterfront Stage

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Amelia’s Magazine | Latitude 2010: Coco de Mer Circus Child Catwalk Review

Central Saint Martins followed swiftly on from the Chelsea College of Art and Design’s graduate collections.

I loved the big fluffy creations of this designer.

Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Felipe Rojas Llanos presented blue and purple silk tailoring on pouty youths, pills this site a welcome diversion from womenswear.

Latitude 2010-Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen by Amelia Gregory
Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen’s spiked dresses and jackets were dramatically sensual and dangerous.

Latitude 2010-fashion hat  by Amelia Gregory
Half hats and shaggy Mr Tomlinson trousers.

Fabulous curled entwined knitwear from Sabrina Brytesson.

Latitude 2010 Lee Brown by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010 Lee Brown by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010 Lee Brown by Amelia Gregory
Sports influenced tailoring from Lee Brown.

Latitude 2010-Sorcha O’Raghallaigh by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Sorcha O’Raghallaigh by Amelia Gregory
80s influenced layered creations from Sorcha O’Raghallaigh were eminently wearable but the star of her collection was the stilt walker.

Latitude 2010-Zoe Sherwood by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Zoe Sherwood by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Zoe Sherwood by Amelia Gregory
Sadly I only caught the best headers from Zoe Sherwood’s feathery collection from the back. However, if there’s one thing for sure she does backs well as this turquoise dress proves.

Latitude fashion 2010-family fun by Amelia Gregory

The fashion shows were delightfully laid back, and enjoyed by plenty of families and young girls who would otherwise not get to see such calibre of upcoming design talent. Despite the lack of information about the presenting designers and the sometimes klutzy new models (Elite, you might want to give a few of them some catwalk training) this was a brilliant addition to Latitude, and with a bit of fine-tuning will hopefully become a festival staple.
Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer burlesque dancer by Amelia Gregory
Mademoiselle Adeline struts here stuff. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Following the Graduate Fashion Shows Coco de Mer also hit the Latitude Waterfront catwalk with a range of fun sequinned swimsuits, order little tailored jackets and hats by Victoria Grant. Inspired by a Victorian circus ringmaster, ailment sales of this bespoke collection will raise funds for the Circus Child charity.

Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
Coco-de-Mer-Circus-Child-by-Mina-Bach
Illustration by Mina Bach.

Andrea Peterson Latitude waterfront fashion coco de mer
Illustration by Andrea Peterson.

Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
james_clare_Coco_De_Mer
Illustration by James Clare.

Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
james_clare_Coco_De_Mer
Illustration by James Clare.

The skinny Elite new faces were completely overshadowed by the fabulous wriggling coquetry of the Burlesque artist who flounced down the catwalk with a pair of huge red feathered fans and a whole lot of sassiness. Now that’s what fit and healthy girls should look like with their clothes off.

Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer burlesque dancer by Amelia Gregory

Categories ,Andrea Peterson, ,Burlesque, ,Circus, ,Coco de mer, ,James Clare, ,Latitude Festival, ,Mademoiselle Adeline, ,Mina Bach., ,Victoria Grant, ,Victorian, ,Waterfront Stage

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | Latitude 2010: Coco de Mer Circus Child Catwalk Review

Central Saint Martins followed swiftly on from the Chelsea College of Art and Design’s graduate collections.

I loved the big fluffy creations of this designer.

Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Felipe Rojas Llanos presented blue and purple silk tailoring on pouty youths, pills this site a welcome diversion from womenswear.

Latitude 2010-Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen by Amelia Gregory
Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen’s spiked dresses and jackets were dramatically sensual and dangerous.

Latitude 2010-fashion hat  by Amelia Gregory
Half hats and shaggy Mr Tomlinson trousers.

Fabulous curled entwined knitwear from Sabrina Brytesson.

Latitude 2010 Lee Brown by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010 Lee Brown by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010 Lee Brown by Amelia Gregory
Sports influenced tailoring from Lee Brown.

Latitude 2010-Sorcha O’Raghallaigh by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Sorcha O’Raghallaigh by Amelia Gregory
80s influenced layered creations from Sorcha O’Raghallaigh were eminently wearable but the star of her collection was the stilt walker.

Latitude 2010-Zoe Sherwood by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Zoe Sherwood by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Zoe Sherwood by Amelia Gregory
Sadly I only caught the best headers from Zoe Sherwood’s feathery collection from the back. However, if there’s one thing for sure she does backs well as this turquoise dress proves.

Latitude fashion 2010-family fun by Amelia Gregory

The fashion shows were delightfully laid back, and enjoyed by plenty of families and young girls who would otherwise not get to see such calibre of upcoming design talent. Despite the lack of information about the presenting designers and the sometimes klutzy new models (Elite, you might want to give a few of them some catwalk training) this was a brilliant addition to Latitude, and with a bit of fine-tuning will hopefully become a festival staple.
Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer burlesque dancer by Amelia Gregory
Mademoiselle Adeline struts here stuff. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Following the Graduate Fashion Shows Coco de Mer also hit the Latitude Waterfront catwalk with a range of fun sequinned swimsuits, order little tailored jackets and hats by Victoria Grant. Inspired by a Victorian circus ringmaster, ailment sales of this bespoke collection will raise funds for the Circus Child charity.

Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
Coco-de-Mer-Circus-Child-by-Mina-Bach
Illustration by Mina Bach.

Andrea Peterson Latitude waterfront fashion coco de mer
Illustration by Andrea Peterson.

Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
james_clare_Coco_De_Mer
Illustration by James Clare.

Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
james_clare_Coco_De_Mer
Illustration by James Clare.

The skinny Elite new faces were completely overshadowed by the fabulous wriggling coquetry of the Burlesque artist who flounced down the catwalk with a pair of huge red feathered fans and a whole lot of sassiness. Now that’s what fit and healthy girls should look like with their clothes off.

Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer burlesque dancer by Amelia Gregory

Categories ,Andrea Peterson, ,Burlesque, ,Circus, ,Coco de mer, ,James Clare, ,Latitude Festival, ,Mademoiselle Adeline, ,Mina Bach., ,Victoria Grant, ,Victorian, ,Waterfront Stage

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | Latitude Festival 2010: A Review of the Comedy Arena, and more.

aomi law-joan-of-arc
the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
The Dying Swan by Jenny Goldstone.

When I was watching Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde set to the soundtrack of Warp artist Scanner at the Purcell Rooms a few months back I had no idea I was witnessing part of an avante garde phenomenon. But it seems there’s nothing more of the moment than the setting of a silent film to a modern day musical score. At Latitude I laid back on the black carpeted floor of the Film and Music Arena (one of the only places not blighted by the incessant dust) to enjoy two silent movies given this most trendy of treatments.

the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
Illustrations by Jenny Goldstone.

On Saturday long lost Russian movie The Dying Swan was set to a live string arrangement from composer Joby Talbot. This 1916 classic was only rediscovered as the communist regime went into decline, purchase and director Evgenii Bauer has since been described as “the greatest filmmaker you’ve never heard of.” The mournful violin and chello were a perfect foil to the downfall of a lovelorn mute who finds solace in ballet.

On Sunday we once more lay amongst the detritus (the South Bank this wasn’t) to watch the cinematic genius of The Passion of Joan of Arc set to a live score by Adrian Utley of Portishead and Will Gregory of Goldfrapp. The film was made in 1928, case shortly after the discovery of the original transcripts of the trial, imprisonment, torture and final execution of Joan of Arc. To convey maximum emotion it utilises mainly close up shots of the actors, a technique that has inspired many filmmakers since. With strings, horns, percussion, keys and the voices of the Monteverdi choir this was one of my absolute highlights of this year’s Latitude Festival. It’s discoveries like this that make the Latitude experience a tough act to follow.

the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
The Dying Swan by Jenny Goldstone.

When I was watching Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde set to the soundtrack of Warp artist Scanner at the Purcell Rooms a few months back I had no idea I was witnessing part of an avante garde phenomenon. But it seems there’s nothing more of the moment than the setting of a silent film to a modern day musical score. At Latitude I laid back on the black carpeted floor of the Film and Music Arena (one of the only places not blighted by the incessant dust) to enjoy two silent movies given this most trendy of treatments.

the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
Illustrations by Jenny Goldstone.

On Saturday long lost Russian movie The Dying Swan was set to a live string arrangement from composer Joby Talbot. This 1916 classic was only rediscovered as the communist regime went into decline, stuff and director Evgenii Bauer has since been described as “the greatest filmmaker you’ve never heard of.” The mournful violin and chello were a perfect foil to the downfall of a lovelorn mute who finds solace in ballet.

naomi law-joan-of-arc
Illustration by Naomi Law.

On Sunday we once more lay amongst the detritus (the South Bank this wasn’t) to watch the cinematic genius of The Passion of Joan of Arc set to a live score by Adrian Utley of Portishead and Will Gregory of Goldfrapp. The film was made in 1928, more about shortly after the discovery of the original transcripts of the trial, imprisonment, torture and final execution of Joan of Arc. To convey maximum emotion it utilises mainly close up shots of the actors, a technique that has inspired many filmmakers since. With strings, horns, percussion, keys and the voices of the Monteverdi choir this was one of my absolute highlights of this year’s Latitude Festival. It’s discoveries like this that make the Latitude experience a tough act to follow.

the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
The Dying Swan by Jenny Goldstone.

When I was watching Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde set to the soundtrack of Warp artist Scanner at the Purcell Rooms a few months back I had no idea I was witnessing part of an avante garde phenomenon. But it seems there’s nothing more of the moment than the setting of a silent film to a modern day musical score. At Latitude I laid back on the black carpeted floor of the Film and Music Arena (one of the only places not blighted by the incessant dust) to enjoy two silent movies given this most trendy of treatments.

the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
Illustrations by Jenny Goldstone.

On Saturday long lost Russian movie The Dying Swan was set to a live string arrangement from composer Joby Talbot. This 1916 classic was only rediscovered as the communist regime went into decline, diagnosis and director Evgenii Bauer has since been described as “the greatest filmmaker you’ve never heard of.” The mournful violin and cello were a perfect foil to the downfall of a lovelorn mute who finds solace in ballet.

naomi law-joan-of-arc
Illustration by Naomi Law.

On Sunday we once more lay amongst the detritus (the South Bank this wasn’t) to watch the cinematic genius of The Passion of Joan of Arc set to a live score by Adrian Utley of Portishead and Will Gregory of Goldfrapp. The film was made in 1928, viagra 40mg shortly after the discovery of the original transcripts of the trial, ampoule imprisonment, torture and final execution of Joan of Arc. To convey maximum emotion it utilises mainly close up shots of the actors, a technique that has inspired many filmmakers since. With strings, horns, percussion, keys and the voices of the Monteverdi choir this was one of my absolute highlights of this year’s Latitude Festival. It’s discoveries like this that make the Latitude experience a tough act to follow.

the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
The Dying Swan by Jenny Goldstone.

When I was watching Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde set to the soundtrack of Warp artist Scanner at the Purcell Rooms a few months back I had no idea I was witnessing part of an avante garde phenomenon. But it seems there’s nothing more of the moment than the setting of a silent film to a modern day musical score. At Latitude I laid back on the black carpeted floor of the Film and Music Arena (one of the only places not blighted by the incessant dust) to enjoy two silent movies given this most trendy of treatments.

the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
Illustrations by Jenny Goldstone.

On Saturday long lost Russian movie The Dying Swan was set to a live string arrangement from composer Joby Talbot. This 1916 classic was only rediscovered as the communist regime went into decline, order and director Evgenii Bauer has since been described as “the greatest filmmaker you’ve never heard of.” The mournful violin and cello were a perfect foil to the downfall of a lovelorn mute who finds solace in ballet.

naomi law-joan-of-arc
Illustration by Naomi Law.

On Sunday we once more lay amongst the detritus (the South Bank this wasn’t) to watch the cinematic genius of The Passion of Joan of Arc set to a live score by Adrian Utley of Portishead and Will Gregory of Goldfrapp. The film was made in 1928, approved shortly after the discovery of the original transcripts of the trial, imprisonment, torture and final execution of Joan of Arc. To convey maximum emotion it utilises mainly close up shots of the actors, a technique that has inspired many filmmakers since. With strings, horns, percussion, keys and the voices of the Monteverdi choir this was one of my absolute highlights of this year’s Latitude Festival. It’s discoveries like this that make the Latitude experience a tough act to follow.

Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.

On Friday afternoon I nestled in rushes amongst the clacking grasshoppers and giggling tweenies to watch the Latitude graduate fashion shows, discount played out along a catwalk linked to the Waterfront Stage. A selection of new faces from Elite Models formed a somewhat confusing parade between two stop offs on either side of the lake, not helped by a complete lack of clarity in announcements of each designer – What follows is the best of what I managed to catch, so if I’ve got any wrong please or not labelled your designs at all do let me know. It was near on impossible to find out who was who. Ahem, lack of individual designer websites ahoy!

Latitude 2010-kids Amelia gregory
Latitude 2010-happy teen by Amelia Gregory
Photography by Amelia Gregory.

First up came the students from Chelsea College of Art and Design:

Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Ellen Chatelain didn’t disappoint with her patchwork knitwear.

Abby-Wright-Latitude-Fashion Ellen Chatelain
Ellen Chatelain by Abby Wright.

Latitude 2010-Sorcha Herbert by Amelia Gregory
More colourful weave, from Sorcha Herbert.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Gorgeous printed textiles by Charmaine Dresser worked perfectly shooting into the sun.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Spectacular lasercut tailoring.

Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Ruched swimwear in mustard and greens. Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyrén.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
More patchworked style.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Subtle tones of caramel and slate.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Padded and stitched capes combined with strange animal and psychedelic prints.

Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.
Sadly the wonderful creations of Bethan Smith never crossed the lake – I guess the models were worried they might fall in. Fair play.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Helen Lawrence
More monochrome geometrics and slate shades from Helen Lawrence.

Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
For Shawana Grosvenor creamy circular layers rule.

Alexis-West-Latitude-Graduate-Fashion-Matthew Inett
Matthew Inett by Alexis West.

Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia gregory
Tagged onto the end of the first half Matthew Inett reprised his 2008 London College of Fashion catwalk show, which featured almighty curved shoulders and exaggerated hips in pastel checks.

Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Matthew Inett by Natasha Thompson.

Next up, my review of the Central Saint Martins show.
Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.

On Friday afternoon I nestled in rushes amongst the clacking grasshoppers and giggling tweenies to watch the Latitude graduate fashion shows, tadalafil played out along a catwalk linked to the Waterfront Stage. A selection of new faces from Elite Models formed a somewhat confusing parade between two stop offs on either side of the lake, not helped by a complete lack of clarity in announcements of each designer – What follows is the best of what I managed to catch, so if I’ve got any wrong please or not labelled your designs at all do let me know. It was near on impossible to find out who was who. Ahem, lack of individual designer websites ahoy!

Latitude 2010-kids Amelia gregory
Latitude 2010-happy teen by Amelia Gregory
Photography by Amelia Gregory.

First up came the students from Chelsea College of Art and Design:

Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Ellen Chatelain didn’t disappoint with her patchwork knitwear.

Abby-Wright-Latitude-Fashion Ellen Chatelain
Ellen Chatelain by Abby Wright.

Latitude 2010-Sorcha Herbert by Amelia Gregory
More colourful weave, from Sorcha Herbert.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Gorgeous printed textiles by Charmaine Dresser worked perfectly shooting into the sun.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Spectacular lasercut tailoring by Francesca Prudente.

Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Ruched swimwear in mustard and greens. Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyrén.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
More patchworked style.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Subtle tones of caramel and slate.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Padded and stitched capes combined with strange animal and psychedelic prints.

Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.
Sadly the wonderful creations of Bethan Smith never crossed the lake – I guess the models were worried they might fall in. Fair play.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Helen Lawrence
More monochrome geometrics and slate shades from Helen Lawrence.

Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
For Shawana Grosvenor creamy circular layers rule.

Alexis-West-Latitude-Graduate-Fashion-Matthew Inett
Matthew Inett by Alexis West.

Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia gregory
Tagged onto the end of the first half Matthew Inett reprised his 2008 London College of Fashion catwalk show, which featured almighty curved shoulders and exaggerated hips in pastel checks.

Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Matthew Inett by Natasha Thompson.

Next up, my review of the Central Saint Martins show.
Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.

On Friday afternoon I nestled in rushes amongst the clacking grasshoppers and giggling tweenies to watch the Latitude graduate fashion shows, buy more about played out along a catwalk linked to the Waterfront Stage. A selection of new faces from Elite Models formed a somewhat confusing parade between two stop offs on either side of the lake, order not helped by a complete lack of clarity in announcements of each designer – What follows is the best of what I managed to catch, so if I’ve got any wrong please or not labelled your designs at all do let me know. It was near on impossible to find out who was who. Ahem, lack of individual designer websites ahoy!
Luckily I have now found out all the right names, but really girls, you gotta get yourselves a much better presence on the web… it’s a mantra I seem to find myself repeating quite a lot.

Latitude 2010-kids Amelia gregory
Latitude 2010-happy teen by Amelia Gregory
Photography by Amelia Gregory.

First up came the students from Chelsea College of Art and Design:

Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Ellen Chatelain didn’t disappoint with her patchwork knitwear.

Abby-Wright-Latitude-Fashion Ellen Chatelain
Ellen Chatelain by Abby Wright.

Latitude 2010-Sorcha Herbert by Amelia Gregory
More colourful weave, from Sorcha Herbert.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Gorgeous printed textiles by Charmaine Dresser worked perfectly shooting into the sun.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Spectacular lasercut tailoring by Francesca Prudente.

Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Ruched swimwear in mustard and greens from Alice Powell. Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyrén.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
More patchworked style courtesy of Cat Finch.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Felicity McDonald-Bing does subtle tones of caramel and slate.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Padded and stitched capes combined with strange animal and psychedelic prints by Sophie Parker.

Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.
Sadly the wonderful creations of Bethan Smith never crossed the lake – I guess the models were worried they might fall in. Fair play.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Triangle wooden panels by Lauren T-Franks.

Latitude 2010-Helen Lawrence
More monochrome geometrics and slate shades from Helen Lawrence.

Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
For Shawana Grosvenor creamy circular layers rule.

Alexis-West-Latitude-Graduate-Fashion-Matthew Inett
Matthew Inett by Alexis West.

Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia gregory
Tagged onto the end of the first half Matthew Inett reprised his 2008 London College of Fashion catwalk show, which featured almighty curved shoulders and exaggerated hips in pastel checks.

Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Matthew Inett by Natasha Thompson.

Next up, my review of the Central Saint Martins show.
James Acaster by Kathryn Jones
James Acaster by Kathryn Jones.

Over the course of Latitude I saw numerous comedians, approved some of whom appeared as comperes on other stages when not performing to surely one of their biggest ever audience (of thousands) in the Comedy Arena. The Cabaret Arena was much favoured, and as of course was the Literary Arena – hanging out with Robin Ince and his fabled posse.

Kevin Eldon, clinic Phil Jupitas, Josie Long… they all dropped by, frequently.

Latitude 2010-Phil Jupitas by Amelia Gregory
Phil Jupitas. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Robin Ince by Stacie Swift
Robin Ince by Stacie Swift.

My favourite part of the longstanding Book Club was a guide to one of Robin Ince’s favourite bad books: Mens’ Secrets, set to a duelling musical accompaniment.

Latitude 2010 James Acaster by Amelia Gregory
James Acaster.

James Acaster was one such novice who I saw happily entertaining pre-act literary crowds with clever improv. Teenage wonder Ivo Graham kept the Cabaret crowd thoroughly entertained with his impromptu rendition of Blind Date – amusingly he is so young he had to be told of Cilla’s name. Weird to think of Blind Date already consigned to ancient TV history.

Latitude 2010-Ivo Graham Blind Date by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Ivo Graham Blind Date by Amelia Gregory
Ivo Graham improvises a round of Blind Date in the Cabaret Arena.

The main Comedy Arena was my favourite place to hang out in 2007, and it’s popularity continues to grow. Despite additional wing tents on each side of the huge central marquee, the arena remained unable to contain the enthusiastic crowds, who kicked up huge volumes of dust with every new exodus and influx.

Abi Daker - Ivo Graham
Ivo Graham by Abigail Daker.
YouTube Preview Image

One of the biggest draws of Latitude is the chance to discover new talent. Ivo Graham is a mere 19 years old, which made his ability to engage a massive audience all the more impressive. With jokes centred around Facebook, pesky younger brothers and getting in trouble with mum, he still struck a chord with the older folks.

Eric Lambert by Gareth A Hopkins
Eric Lambert by Gareth A Hopkins.

Eric Lambert was winner of the Latitude New Act of the Year 2010, although from what I heard Ivo would have been way more deserving…. or James. Eric’s winning performance centred around an improv routine that wasn’t always quite up to scratch.

Latitude 2010-Eric Lambert by Amelia Gregory
Eric Lambert.

He was cheeky and sexual, no doubt a hit with the ladies. It’s proved nigh on impossible to do any research into Eric since he seems to have zero internet presence… but I would guess from his demeanour that he’s a big fan of Russell Brand.

docbrown_by_iamanoctopus
Doc Brown by Iamanoctopus.

Of the better known comedians I really enjoyed the guide to slang courtesy of Doc Brown, who was formerly a rapper and just happens to be younger brother of Zadie Smith. Sucking snot out of his small child and inappropriate comments on packed buses define his descent towards the normality of family life.

stephen-k-amos-suziewinsor
Stephen K. Amos by Suzie Winsor.

Following him on Friday South Londoner Stephen K. Amos was suitably un-PC, berating his previous Yorkshire audience for its lack of diversity, ripping the piss out of posh people, bemoaning his old age (he’s 35. there’s no hope for me) and generally causing loud if somewhat uncomfortable chuckles across the arena.

On Sunday we caught the tail end of Rufus Hound, who was indeed face-painted up like a dog, if somewhat lacking of a tail. He spoke of the trials and tribulations of marriage and babies… which led onto the misogynistic diatribe of Richard Herring, a 43 year old singleton who made jokes about tit wanks and gay sex, accompanied by a signer for those hard of hearing. Or perhaps just to afford the opportunity to make yet more lewd jokes.

Richard Herring by Sine Skau
Richard Herring by Sine Skau.

He also over-milked an incredibly tedious tirade about Mars Bars that met with a fairly frosty reception… that became part of the act… that increased it’s tediousity. I think he was my least favourite comedian at Latitude.

ANDREW LAWRENCE Faye Skinner
Andrew Lawrence by Faye West.

Next up Andrew Lawrence was really quite sinister but also strangely endearing, geared as his jokes were around his all round lack of appeal. Hey, why the sadness? I’ve always had a soft spot for scrawny gingers! Leaning back at a jaunty angle and grinning demonically he spoke of his semi-autistic relationship with his current (long-suffering) girlfriend. Hey, doesn’t that cover most men?

Latitude 2010- Deborah Francis White by Amelia Gregory
Deborah Francis White.

Lastly, Deborah Francis White put on her genius show How To Get Almost Anyone To Want To Sleep With You on Sunday in the Cabaret Arena. “Every actor wants to be in a sitcom, every man wants to be in a woman,” she informed us, talking us through a series of pie charts that showed the different state of mind for women. Whilst we’d like practically every man we meet to want to sleep with us (approximately 95% according to Deborah) the reverse is true when it comes to the amount of men we actually want to sleep with.

Deborah Francis White Oversees a Bra Fight by Gareth A Hopkins
Deborah Francis White Oversees a Bra Fight by Gareth A Hopkins.

To a chorus of knowing laughter from women, slightly nervous laughter from the men, she talked us through the best way to pull the opposite sex. “Be a Scorsese movie!” she opined, extolling the virtues of confidence. “You’re probably not going to get a part in me…” But the point is that every man should want to. Even if the reason they’re so fixated on lesbian porn is simply “two tits good, four tits better.”

Latitude 2010- Deborah Francis White by Amelia Gregory
Women stroking themselves to much amusement.

Latitude 2010- Deborah Francis White by Amelia Gregory
Tube-hanging.

She persuaded the women in the audience to stroke themselves on the breast to turn the men on, pulled people out of the audience to follow her instructions on how to tell a girl on the tube she’s gorgeous, and finished with a bra wrestling match between two men. Because who wants to sleep with a man who can’t get a bra off with one hand?

The comedy at Latitude Festival is undeniably one of its biggest selling points… now if only they could figure out how to accommodate the heaving numbers of people that yearn to be amused.

Categories ,Abigail Daker, ,Andrew Lawrence, ,Blind Date, ,Cabaret Arena, ,Comedy Arena, ,Deborah Francis White, ,Eric Lambert, ,Faye Skinner, ,Faye West, ,Gareth Hopkins, ,Iamanoctopus, ,Ivo Graham, ,James Acaster, ,Josie Long, ,Kathryn Jones, ,Kevin Eldon, ,Latitude Festival, ,Literary Arena, ,Phil Jupitas, ,Richard Herring, ,Robin Ince, ,Rufus Hound, ,Russell Brand, ,Sine Skau, ,Stacie Swift, ,Stephen K. Amos, ,Suzie Winsor, ,Zadie Smith

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Amelia’s Magazine | Latitude Festival 2010: A Review of the Comedy Arena, and more.

aomi law-joan-of-arc
the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
The Dying Swan by Jenny Goldstone.

When I was watching Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde set to the soundtrack of Warp artist Scanner at the Purcell Rooms a few months back I had no idea I was witnessing part of an avante garde phenomenon. But it seems there’s nothing more of the moment than the setting of a silent film to a modern day musical score. At Latitude I laid back on the black carpeted floor of the Film and Music Arena (one of the only places not blighted by the incessant dust) to enjoy two silent movies given this most trendy of treatments.

the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
Illustrations by Jenny Goldstone.

On Saturday long lost Russian movie The Dying Swan was set to a live string arrangement from composer Joby Talbot. This 1916 classic was only rediscovered as the communist regime went into decline, purchase and director Evgenii Bauer has since been described as “the greatest filmmaker you’ve never heard of.” The mournful violin and chello were a perfect foil to the downfall of a lovelorn mute who finds solace in ballet.

On Sunday we once more lay amongst the detritus (the South Bank this wasn’t) to watch the cinematic genius of The Passion of Joan of Arc set to a live score by Adrian Utley of Portishead and Will Gregory of Goldfrapp. The film was made in 1928, case shortly after the discovery of the original transcripts of the trial, imprisonment, torture and final execution of Joan of Arc. To convey maximum emotion it utilises mainly close up shots of the actors, a technique that has inspired many filmmakers since. With strings, horns, percussion, keys and the voices of the Monteverdi choir this was one of my absolute highlights of this year’s Latitude Festival. It’s discoveries like this that make the Latitude experience a tough act to follow.

the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
The Dying Swan by Jenny Goldstone.

When I was watching Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde set to the soundtrack of Warp artist Scanner at the Purcell Rooms a few months back I had no idea I was witnessing part of an avante garde phenomenon. But it seems there’s nothing more of the moment than the setting of a silent film to a modern day musical score. At Latitude I laid back on the black carpeted floor of the Film and Music Arena (one of the only places not blighted by the incessant dust) to enjoy two silent movies given this most trendy of treatments.

the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
Illustrations by Jenny Goldstone.

On Saturday long lost Russian movie The Dying Swan was set to a live string arrangement from composer Joby Talbot. This 1916 classic was only rediscovered as the communist regime went into decline, stuff and director Evgenii Bauer has since been described as “the greatest filmmaker you’ve never heard of.” The mournful violin and chello were a perfect foil to the downfall of a lovelorn mute who finds solace in ballet.

naomi law-joan-of-arc
Illustration by Naomi Law.

On Sunday we once more lay amongst the detritus (the South Bank this wasn’t) to watch the cinematic genius of The Passion of Joan of Arc set to a live score by Adrian Utley of Portishead and Will Gregory of Goldfrapp. The film was made in 1928, more about shortly after the discovery of the original transcripts of the trial, imprisonment, torture and final execution of Joan of Arc. To convey maximum emotion it utilises mainly close up shots of the actors, a technique that has inspired many filmmakers since. With strings, horns, percussion, keys and the voices of the Monteverdi choir this was one of my absolute highlights of this year’s Latitude Festival. It’s discoveries like this that make the Latitude experience a tough act to follow.

the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
The Dying Swan by Jenny Goldstone.

When I was watching Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde set to the soundtrack of Warp artist Scanner at the Purcell Rooms a few months back I had no idea I was witnessing part of an avante garde phenomenon. But it seems there’s nothing more of the moment than the setting of a silent film to a modern day musical score. At Latitude I laid back on the black carpeted floor of the Film and Music Arena (one of the only places not blighted by the incessant dust) to enjoy two silent movies given this most trendy of treatments.

the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
Illustrations by Jenny Goldstone.

On Saturday long lost Russian movie The Dying Swan was set to a live string arrangement from composer Joby Talbot. This 1916 classic was only rediscovered as the communist regime went into decline, diagnosis and director Evgenii Bauer has since been described as “the greatest filmmaker you’ve never heard of.” The mournful violin and cello were a perfect foil to the downfall of a lovelorn mute who finds solace in ballet.

naomi law-joan-of-arc
Illustration by Naomi Law.

On Sunday we once more lay amongst the detritus (the South Bank this wasn’t) to watch the cinematic genius of The Passion of Joan of Arc set to a live score by Adrian Utley of Portishead and Will Gregory of Goldfrapp. The film was made in 1928, viagra 40mg shortly after the discovery of the original transcripts of the trial, ampoule imprisonment, torture and final execution of Joan of Arc. To convey maximum emotion it utilises mainly close up shots of the actors, a technique that has inspired many filmmakers since. With strings, horns, percussion, keys and the voices of the Monteverdi choir this was one of my absolute highlights of this year’s Latitude Festival. It’s discoveries like this that make the Latitude experience a tough act to follow.

the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
The Dying Swan by Jenny Goldstone.

When I was watching Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde set to the soundtrack of Warp artist Scanner at the Purcell Rooms a few months back I had no idea I was witnessing part of an avante garde phenomenon. But it seems there’s nothing more of the moment than the setting of a silent film to a modern day musical score. At Latitude I laid back on the black carpeted floor of the Film and Music Arena (one of the only places not blighted by the incessant dust) to enjoy two silent movies given this most trendy of treatments.

the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
the-dying-swan-Joby Talbot by jenny-goldstone
Illustrations by Jenny Goldstone.

On Saturday long lost Russian movie The Dying Swan was set to a live string arrangement from composer Joby Talbot. This 1916 classic was only rediscovered as the communist regime went into decline, order and director Evgenii Bauer has since been described as “the greatest filmmaker you’ve never heard of.” The mournful violin and cello were a perfect foil to the downfall of a lovelorn mute who finds solace in ballet.

naomi law-joan-of-arc
Illustration by Naomi Law.

On Sunday we once more lay amongst the detritus (the South Bank this wasn’t) to watch the cinematic genius of The Passion of Joan of Arc set to a live score by Adrian Utley of Portishead and Will Gregory of Goldfrapp. The film was made in 1928, approved shortly after the discovery of the original transcripts of the trial, imprisonment, torture and final execution of Joan of Arc. To convey maximum emotion it utilises mainly close up shots of the actors, a technique that has inspired many filmmakers since. With strings, horns, percussion, keys and the voices of the Monteverdi choir this was one of my absolute highlights of this year’s Latitude Festival. It’s discoveries like this that make the Latitude experience a tough act to follow.

Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.

On Friday afternoon I nestled in rushes amongst the clacking grasshoppers and giggling tweenies to watch the Latitude graduate fashion shows, discount played out along a catwalk linked to the Waterfront Stage. A selection of new faces from Elite Models formed a somewhat confusing parade between two stop offs on either side of the lake, not helped by a complete lack of clarity in announcements of each designer – What follows is the best of what I managed to catch, so if I’ve got any wrong please or not labelled your designs at all do let me know. It was near on impossible to find out who was who. Ahem, lack of individual designer websites ahoy!

Latitude 2010-kids Amelia gregory
Latitude 2010-happy teen by Amelia Gregory
Photography by Amelia Gregory.

First up came the students from Chelsea College of Art and Design:

Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Ellen Chatelain didn’t disappoint with her patchwork knitwear.

Abby-Wright-Latitude-Fashion Ellen Chatelain
Ellen Chatelain by Abby Wright.

Latitude 2010-Sorcha Herbert by Amelia Gregory
More colourful weave, from Sorcha Herbert.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Gorgeous printed textiles by Charmaine Dresser worked perfectly shooting into the sun.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Spectacular lasercut tailoring.

Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Ruched swimwear in mustard and greens. Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyrén.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
More patchworked style.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Subtle tones of caramel and slate.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Padded and stitched capes combined with strange animal and psychedelic prints.

Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.
Sadly the wonderful creations of Bethan Smith never crossed the lake – I guess the models were worried they might fall in. Fair play.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Helen Lawrence
More monochrome geometrics and slate shades from Helen Lawrence.

Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
For Shawana Grosvenor creamy circular layers rule.

Alexis-West-Latitude-Graduate-Fashion-Matthew Inett
Matthew Inett by Alexis West.

Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia gregory
Tagged onto the end of the first half Matthew Inett reprised his 2008 London College of Fashion catwalk show, which featured almighty curved shoulders and exaggerated hips in pastel checks.

Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Matthew Inett by Natasha Thompson.

Next up, my review of the Central Saint Martins show.
Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.

On Friday afternoon I nestled in rushes amongst the clacking grasshoppers and giggling tweenies to watch the Latitude graduate fashion shows, tadalafil played out along a catwalk linked to the Waterfront Stage. A selection of new faces from Elite Models formed a somewhat confusing parade between two stop offs on either side of the lake, not helped by a complete lack of clarity in announcements of each designer – What follows is the best of what I managed to catch, so if I’ve got any wrong please or not labelled your designs at all do let me know. It was near on impossible to find out who was who. Ahem, lack of individual designer websites ahoy!

Latitude 2010-kids Amelia gregory
Latitude 2010-happy teen by Amelia Gregory
Photography by Amelia Gregory.

First up came the students from Chelsea College of Art and Design:

Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Ellen Chatelain didn’t disappoint with her patchwork knitwear.

Abby-Wright-Latitude-Fashion Ellen Chatelain
Ellen Chatelain by Abby Wright.

Latitude 2010-Sorcha Herbert by Amelia Gregory
More colourful weave, from Sorcha Herbert.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Gorgeous printed textiles by Charmaine Dresser worked perfectly shooting into the sun.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Spectacular lasercut tailoring by Francesca Prudente.

Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Ruched swimwear in mustard and greens. Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyrén.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
More patchworked style.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Subtle tones of caramel and slate.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Padded and stitched capes combined with strange animal and psychedelic prints.

Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.
Sadly the wonderful creations of Bethan Smith never crossed the lake – I guess the models were worried they might fall in. Fair play.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Helen Lawrence
More monochrome geometrics and slate shades from Helen Lawrence.

Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
For Shawana Grosvenor creamy circular layers rule.

Alexis-West-Latitude-Graduate-Fashion-Matthew Inett
Matthew Inett by Alexis West.

Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia gregory
Tagged onto the end of the first half Matthew Inett reprised his 2008 London College of Fashion catwalk show, which featured almighty curved shoulders and exaggerated hips in pastel checks.

Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Matthew Inett by Natasha Thompson.

Next up, my review of the Central Saint Martins show.
Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.

On Friday afternoon I nestled in rushes amongst the clacking grasshoppers and giggling tweenies to watch the Latitude graduate fashion shows, buy more about played out along a catwalk linked to the Waterfront Stage. A selection of new faces from Elite Models formed a somewhat confusing parade between two stop offs on either side of the lake, order not helped by a complete lack of clarity in announcements of each designer – What follows is the best of what I managed to catch, so if I’ve got any wrong please or not labelled your designs at all do let me know. It was near on impossible to find out who was who. Ahem, lack of individual designer websites ahoy!
Luckily I have now found out all the right names, but really girls, you gotta get yourselves a much better presence on the web… it’s a mantra I seem to find myself repeating quite a lot.

Latitude 2010-kids Amelia gregory
Latitude 2010-happy teen by Amelia Gregory
Photography by Amelia Gregory.

First up came the students from Chelsea College of Art and Design:

Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Ellen Chatelain by Amelia Gregory
Ellen Chatelain didn’t disappoint with her patchwork knitwear.

Abby-Wright-Latitude-Fashion Ellen Chatelain
Ellen Chatelain by Abby Wright.

Latitude 2010-Sorcha Herbert by Amelia Gregory
More colourful weave, from Sorcha Herbert.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Gorgeous printed textiles by Charmaine Dresser worked perfectly shooting into the sun.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Spectacular lasercut tailoring by Francesca Prudente.

Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Latitude fashion Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Ruched swimwear in mustard and greens from Alice Powell. Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyrén.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
More patchworked style courtesy of Cat Finch.

Latitude 2010 fashion by Amelia Gregory
Felicity McDonald-Bing does subtle tones of caramel and slate.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Padded and stitched capes combined with strange animal and psychedelic prints by Sophie Parker.

Bethan Smith Latitude Festival by Krister Selin
Bethan Smith by Krister Selin.
Sadly the wonderful creations of Bethan Smith never crossed the lake – I guess the models were worried they might fall in. Fair play.

Latitude 2010-fashion by Amelia Gregory
Triangle wooden panels by Lauren T-Franks.

Latitude 2010-Helen Lawrence
More monochrome geometrics and slate shades from Helen Lawrence.

Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Shawana Grosvenor by Amelia Gregory
For Shawana Grosvenor creamy circular layers rule.

Alexis-West-Latitude-Graduate-Fashion-Matthew Inett
Matthew Inett by Alexis West.

Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Matthew Inett by Amelia gregory
Tagged onto the end of the first half Matthew Inett reprised his 2008 London College of Fashion catwalk show, which featured almighty curved shoulders and exaggerated hips in pastel checks.

Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Natasha-Thompson-Matthew-Inett-Fashion-Latitude-2010
Matthew Inett by Natasha Thompson.

Next up, my review of the Central Saint Martins show.
James Acaster by Kathryn Jones
James Acaster by Kathryn Jones.

Over the course of Latitude I saw numerous comedians, approved some of whom appeared as comperes on other stages when not performing to surely one of their biggest ever audience (of thousands) in the Comedy Arena. The Cabaret Arena was much favoured, and as of course was the Literary Arena – hanging out with Robin Ince and his fabled posse.

Kevin Eldon, clinic Phil Jupitas, Josie Long… they all dropped by, frequently.

Latitude 2010-Phil Jupitas by Amelia Gregory
Phil Jupitas. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Robin Ince by Stacie Swift
Robin Ince by Stacie Swift.

My favourite part of the longstanding Book Club was a guide to one of Robin Ince’s favourite bad books: Mens’ Secrets, set to a duelling musical accompaniment.

Latitude 2010 James Acaster by Amelia Gregory
James Acaster.

James Acaster was one such novice who I saw happily entertaining pre-act literary crowds with clever improv. Teenage wonder Ivo Graham kept the Cabaret crowd thoroughly entertained with his impromptu rendition of Blind Date – amusingly he is so young he had to be told of Cilla’s name. Weird to think of Blind Date already consigned to ancient TV history.

Latitude 2010-Ivo Graham Blind Date by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Ivo Graham Blind Date by Amelia Gregory
Ivo Graham improvises a round of Blind Date in the Cabaret Arena.

The main Comedy Arena was my favourite place to hang out in 2007, and it’s popularity continues to grow. Despite additional wing tents on each side of the huge central marquee, the arena remained unable to contain the enthusiastic crowds, who kicked up huge volumes of dust with every new exodus and influx.

Abi Daker - Ivo Graham
Ivo Graham by Abigail Daker.
YouTube Preview Image

One of the biggest draws of Latitude is the chance to discover new talent. Ivo Graham is a mere 19 years old, which made his ability to engage a massive audience all the more impressive. With jokes centred around Facebook, pesky younger brothers and getting in trouble with mum, he still struck a chord with the older folks.

Eric Lambert by Gareth A Hopkins
Eric Lambert by Gareth A Hopkins.

Eric Lambert was winner of the Latitude New Act of the Year 2010, although from what I heard Ivo would have been way more deserving…. or James. Eric’s winning performance centred around an improv routine that wasn’t always quite up to scratch.

Latitude 2010-Eric Lambert by Amelia Gregory
Eric Lambert.

He was cheeky and sexual, no doubt a hit with the ladies. It’s proved nigh on impossible to do any research into Eric since he seems to have zero internet presence… but I would guess from his demeanour that he’s a big fan of Russell Brand.

docbrown_by_iamanoctopus
Doc Brown by Iamanoctopus.

Of the better known comedians I really enjoyed the guide to slang courtesy of Doc Brown, who was formerly a rapper and just happens to be younger brother of Zadie Smith. Sucking snot out of his small child and inappropriate comments on packed buses define his descent towards the normality of family life.

stephen-k-amos-suziewinsor
Stephen K. Amos by Suzie Winsor.

Following him on Friday South Londoner Stephen K. Amos was suitably un-PC, berating his previous Yorkshire audience for its lack of diversity, ripping the piss out of posh people, bemoaning his old age (he’s 35. there’s no hope for me) and generally causing loud if somewhat uncomfortable chuckles across the arena.

On Sunday we caught the tail end of Rufus Hound, who was indeed face-painted up like a dog, if somewhat lacking of a tail. He spoke of the trials and tribulations of marriage and babies… which led onto the misogynistic diatribe of Richard Herring, a 43 year old singleton who made jokes about tit wanks and gay sex, accompanied by a signer for those hard of hearing. Or perhaps just to afford the opportunity to make yet more lewd jokes.

Richard Herring by Sine Skau
Richard Herring by Sine Skau.

He also over-milked an incredibly tedious tirade about Mars Bars that met with a fairly frosty reception… that became part of the act… that increased it’s tediousity. I think he was my least favourite comedian at Latitude.

ANDREW LAWRENCE Faye Skinner
Andrew Lawrence by Faye West.

Next up Andrew Lawrence was really quite sinister but also strangely endearing, geared as his jokes were around his all round lack of appeal. Hey, why the sadness? I’ve always had a soft spot for scrawny gingers! Leaning back at a jaunty angle and grinning demonically he spoke of his semi-autistic relationship with his current (long-suffering) girlfriend. Hey, doesn’t that cover most men?

Latitude 2010- Deborah Francis White by Amelia Gregory
Deborah Francis White.

Lastly, Deborah Francis White put on her genius show How To Get Almost Anyone To Want To Sleep With You on Sunday in the Cabaret Arena. “Every actor wants to be in a sitcom, every man wants to be in a woman,” she informed us, talking us through a series of pie charts that showed the different state of mind for women. Whilst we’d like practically every man we meet to want to sleep with us (approximately 95% according to Deborah) the reverse is true when it comes to the amount of men we actually want to sleep with.

Deborah Francis White Oversees a Bra Fight by Gareth A Hopkins
Deborah Francis White Oversees a Bra Fight by Gareth A Hopkins.

To a chorus of knowing laughter from women, slightly nervous laughter from the men, she talked us through the best way to pull the opposite sex. “Be a Scorsese movie!” she opined, extolling the virtues of confidence. “You’re probably not going to get a part in me…” But the point is that every man should want to. Even if the reason they’re so fixated on lesbian porn is simply “two tits good, four tits better.”

Latitude 2010- Deborah Francis White by Amelia Gregory
Women stroking themselves to much amusement.

Latitude 2010- Deborah Francis White by Amelia Gregory
Tube-hanging.

She persuaded the women in the audience to stroke themselves on the breast to turn the men on, pulled people out of the audience to follow her instructions on how to tell a girl on the tube she’s gorgeous, and finished with a bra wrestling match between two men. Because who wants to sleep with a man who can’t get a bra off with one hand?

The comedy at Latitude Festival is undeniably one of its biggest selling points… now if only they could figure out how to accommodate the heaving numbers of people that yearn to be amused.

Categories ,Abigail Daker, ,Andrew Lawrence, ,Blind Date, ,Cabaret Arena, ,Comedy Arena, ,Deborah Francis White, ,Eric Lambert, ,Faye Skinner, ,Faye West, ,Gareth Hopkins, ,Iamanoctopus, ,Ivo Graham, ,James Acaster, ,Josie Long, ,Kathryn Jones, ,Kevin Eldon, ,Latitude Festival, ,Literary Arena, ,Phil Jupitas, ,Richard Herring, ,Robin Ince, ,Rufus Hound, ,Russell Brand, ,Sine Skau, ,Stacie Swift, ,Stephen K. Amos, ,Suzie Winsor, ,Zadie Smith

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