Amelia’s Magazine | An interview with fashion photographer Cynthia Berger

From the series Post Punk

A little while ago I wrote an article about fashion in Berlin. It wasn’t particularly amorous to say the least; save a few incredible museums, I wasn’t overtly impressed by the grade of the fashion I saw on the street. I was only there for the weekend, mind.

Coincidentally an email popped into the fashion inbox pretty soon after from Cynthia Berger – German born and Berlin based fashion photographer. I failed to mention my less-than-flattering view of Berlin, but her photographs completely stole my attention.

Cynthia is a fashion photographer through and through, and her early years were spent wielding a camera with the help of her photographer father.

The images Cynthia creates are often stark portraits of the citizens of Berlin, and with minimal settings and styling, there is a real photojournalistic realism to her photographs (it’s no surprise to discover, then, that her influential father was also a journalist). Her work reminds me much of some of the work that was featured in Amelia’s Magazine – Louise Samuelson in Issue 08 for example.

Cynthia uses street-cast models in her photographs, giving each picture added verisimilitude, along with the designs of up-and-coming Berlin fashion designers; with most of her work being set within the dramatic urban landscape of Berlin itself, Cynthia’s photographs totally embody the spirit of this historical city.

From the series Berlin Fashion

I managed to have a quick chat with Cynthia about her father, her work and her future…

How did you get in to photography?
My father was both a photographer and a journalist, so at a very early age I was surrounded by photography. At aged 8 I started to take my own photographs.
 
What did you study?
I studied Photography in Germany and worked later in Capetown as a photographer’s assistant. Back in Germany, I studied Communication and worked for a while as a researcher in the media world, finally coming home after that.

How do your shoots come together?
The photograph is already taken in my mind before I go and shoot. I plan the shoots entirely, so that I have the freedom to experience everything and to allow the ideas to evolve.

What about photography in particular keeps you focussed?
I like to involve and inspire people.

From the series Boys in the Suburbs

What messages do your photographs carry?
Every photograph always carries a variety of messages.

Which photographers do you admire, and why?
I like Richard Avedon, particularly his portraits – they have such high density and intense impression. I also like the work of Anna Gaskell, her mysterious atmosphere and symbolic storytelling.

How is the fashion/photography scene in Berlin?
Berlin is the fashion capital of Germany. Berlin is a city that is immensely inspiring through constant change. It’s a melting pot for design, fashion, art, architecture, music and photography.

Have you travelled as a photographer?
I lived three years in Capetown, a year in London and did a few travels through the USA and Europe.

Do you think photographs can change opinions, challenge ideals, inform, provoke or otherwise?
They can – if you put them into the right context.  

What are your plans for the future?
I write any ideas I have in my “Idea Book” that I have with me wherever I am. I have many projects planned for the future, with an exhibition here in Berlin high on the list.

From the series Laura’s Story, exclusive to Amelia’s Magazine

You can see more of Cynthia’s work here.

Categories ,Amelia’s Magazine 08, ,Anna Gaskell, ,berlin, ,Capetown, ,Communication, ,Cynthia Berger, ,fashion, ,Germany, ,journalism, ,landscape, ,london, ,Louise Samuelson, ,Matt Bramford, ,Messages, ,models, ,photography, ,photojournalism, ,Richard Avedon, ,South Africa

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Amelia’s Magazine | An interview with fashion photographer Cynthia Berger

From the series Post Punk

A little while ago I wrote an article about fashion in Berlin. It wasn’t particularly amorous to say the least; save a few incredible museums, I wasn’t overtly impressed by the grade of the fashion I saw on the street. I was only there for the weekend, mind.

Coincidentally an email popped into the fashion inbox pretty soon after from Cynthia Berger – German born and Berlin based fashion photographer. I failed to mention my less-than-flattering view of Berlin, but her photographs completely stole my attention.

Cynthia is a fashion photographer through and through, and her early years were spent wielding a camera with the help of her photographer father.

The images Cynthia creates are often stark portraits of the citizens of Berlin, and with minimal settings and styling, there is a real photojournalistic realism to her photographs (it’s no surprise to discover, then, that her influential father was also a journalist). Her work reminds me much of some of the work that was featured in Amelia’s Magazine – Louise Samuelson in Issue 08 for example.

Cynthia uses street-cast models in her photographs, giving each picture added verisimilitude, along with the designs of up-and-coming Berlin fashion designers; with most of her work being set within the dramatic urban landscape of Berlin itself, Cynthia’s photographs totally embody the spirit of this historical city.

From the series Berlin Fashion

I managed to have a quick chat with Cynthia about her father, her work and her future…

How did you get in to photography?
My father was both a photographer and a journalist, so at a very early age I was surrounded by photography. At aged 8 I started to take my own photographs.
 
What did you study?
I studied Photography in Germany and worked later in Capetown as a photographer’s assistant. Back in Germany, I studied Communication and worked for a while as a researcher in the media world, finally coming home after that.

How do your shoots come together?
The photograph is already taken in my mind before I go and shoot. I plan the shoots entirely, so that I have the freedom to experience everything and to allow the ideas to evolve.

What about photography in particular keeps you focussed?
I like to involve and inspire people.

From the series Boys in the Suburbs

What messages do your photographs carry?
Every photograph always carries a variety of messages.

Which photographers do you admire, and why?
I like Richard Avedon, particularly his portraits – they have such high density and intense impression. I also like the work of Anna Gaskell, her mysterious atmosphere and symbolic storytelling.

How is the fashion/photography scene in Berlin?
Berlin is the fashion capital of Germany. Berlin is a city that is immensely inspiring through constant change. It’s a melting pot for design, fashion, art, architecture, music and photography.

Have you travelled as a photographer?
I lived three years in Capetown, a year in London and did a few travels through the USA and Europe.

Do you think photographs can change opinions, challenge ideals, inform, provoke or otherwise?
They can – if you put them into the right context.  

What are your plans for the future?
I write any ideas I have in my “Idea Book” that I have with me wherever I am. I have many projects planned for the future, with an exhibition here in Berlin high on the list.

From the series Laura’s Story, exclusive to Amelia’s Magazine

You can see more of Cynthia’s work here.



Categories ,Amelia’s Magazine 08, ,Anna Gaskell, ,berlin, ,Capetown, ,Communication, ,Cynthia Berger, ,fashion, ,Germany, ,journalism, ,landscape, ,london, ,Louise Samuelson, ,Matt Bramford, ,Messages, ,models, ,photography, ,photojournalism, ,Richard Avedon, ,South Africa

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Amelia’s Magazine | Food For Thought


22 year old Luciano Scherer is truly dedicated to his cause. Working 8-10 hours a day, more about 7 days week, he produces paintings, sculptures and animation until his back hurts too much to carry on. The Brazilian self-taught artist works alone as well as with a collective called ‘Upgrade do Macaco’, and has collaborated with Bruno 9li and Emerson Pingarilho. I found him to be much older than his years, with some very insightful and philosophical things to say about everything from art to life and the internet.

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When did you realise you had creative talent?

When I was 8 years old my school had a drawing challenge for a children’s book, the teachers read the book to us and we should drew parts of it. My drawing was chosen, it was not the best, but it was the craziest, and the teachers said to me that I was very creative. I started to draw again when I was 15, and only seriously when I was 18.

Which artists or illustrators do you most admire?

From the past: Bosch, Brueghel, Jan van Eyck, Crivelli, Albrecht Altdorfer, gothic art in general. I also like alchemical drawings, illuminated manuscripts, and popular art from my country. But my real influences are my artist friends, they helped me to transform my spirit, not just my art, modifying my inside shell, something that still happens everyday. They are: Carla Barth, Carlos Dias, Bruno 9li, Emerson Pingarilho, Talita Hoffmann, Upgrade do Macaco collective. My current master is Jaca, he is genius.

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Who or what is your nemesis?

My nemesis is somebody with lot of dedication and creativity to create evil things, like guns, bombs, wars, murders, lies.

If you could time travel back or forward to any era, where would you go?

I would go to the late-gothic era, in the end of the 15th century and early 16th century, just to understand or comprehend a little better how artists can do those masterpieces. I want to know about the places, the woods, the people’s clothes, the churches, the religions and the spirituality of this time. It is my all time golden age of painting. They all invested years of dedication to each piece, the result of it is bigger than our current comprehension.

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If we visited you in your home town, where would you take us?

My hometown is a very small city in the extreme south of Brazil, almost Uruguay. There’s no galleries, no museums, no cinema, no nothing! But there are very beautiful natural places, like mystery fog woods, beautiful beaches with nobody, lakes, fields, lots of different animals; I will take you to all these places.

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To what extent is your work influenced by your religion or spirituality?

I’m a son of a catholic father who takes me to the church every Sunday, and a mystic mother who is deeply connected with questions of spirituality. All my life I’ve been in catholic schools, and the people that I know there appear to be dedicated to God with tons of saints in sculptures, bracelets, necklaces, flyers, but the rest of their lives they spend being so petty, earthly, extremely connected with just the image of faith, and the concepts of guilty, suffering and impotencies. This contradiction makes me feel revolted, and at the same time I too have been into spiritualism, a Christian based doctrine, but much more metaphysical. This time the metaphysical seems to me so curious, respectable and scary, very scary. So when I started to paint, the images of Catholicism caused a strange fusion of respect, fear, nostalgia, and anger. I felt I needed to work over them, to learn about them and get more intimate, question the images and dogmas and lose the fear. It was a period of destruction like a renaissance. For a year now I’ve found myself distant from the doctrines, but between all of them, mainly the oriental ones like Buddhism and Hinduism, I’m feeling more spiritualized than religious. But this is just the start; I have much more to learn and I’m trying to not answer all the questions but instead learning to live together with them. All of this reflects in my artwork.

scherer5.jpg

If you weren’t an artist, what would you be doing?

An artist’s assistant, or a curator, or a collector; art aside, I’d be a garden sculptor.

Where would you like to be in 10 years time?

Living in a self-sustainable vegetarian community, with all my friends and family, in a place not too hot and not too cold, with as many animals as possible, all of them free.

What advice would you give up and coming artists?

Over and over I’ve heard people say “art doesn’t make any money” or “what do you want to be an artist for, it’s so useless”. I’ve stopped listening to the cynics now though.

scherer6.jpg

What was the last book you read?

I read the David Lynch book about transcendental meditation “Into Deep Water” (This is the name in Brazil), and the Krishnamurthy’s “Freedom from the Known”- it’s like a bible to me, I read it over and over. I’ve been reading H. P. Blavatsky “Voice of the Silence” and “Isis Unveiled” too. Now I’m reading Nietzsche’s “Also Sprach Zarathustra”, it’s awesome.

What piece of modern technology can you not live without?

The Internet. It’s my mail, my books, my telephone, my all time world museum 24-7.

scherer7.jpg

What is your guilty pleasure?

The excesses, in food, drink, work, sleep. Anytime I get too much of these things I feel so regretful, but I’m working on it.

Tell us something about Luciano Scherer that we didn’t know already.

I have a post-rap band, named Casiotron. And I’m working on my first individual exhibition, at Thomas Cohn Gallery next year.

scherer8.jpg

This is certainly a young man full of promise.
As a purveyor of Steve Reich meets Daniel Johnston instrumental music, sickness Graeme Ronald, a.k.a. Remember Remember, is keen to take it to the stage as nature intended:
“I’ve put together a seven piece band for this tour. It’s hard to time it right but it’s worth it. Using a laptop isn’t the same as a live band is it?”

remember_remember_interview%201.jpg

Sitting in the back of a Brighton drinking den, Ronald exudes a boyish sense of wide- eyed enthusiasm. Currently touring with influential US noise crew, Growing, he’s rightfully proud of his self-titled debut album on Mogwai‘s Rock Action Records. Ronald’s sweet, Glasgow brogue suffuses our conversation as he gives me an insight into his formative days:
“I played with Mogwai as an additional keyboard player. I kept pestering them to let me join the band. I was working on my own stuff with a Loop station and started playing live regularly. Mogwai came down to hang out at one show and then offered to do an album”

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As it has afforded him so many opportunities, Ronald is proud of his home city:
“Glasgow does have a great music scene. It takes going away to appreciate what’s there. The art school or dole queue are great places to meet musicians. It’s a vibrant environment. Best steer clear of the Neds though”

The music of Remember Remember mirrors the urban, comfortingly grey, concrete beauty of Glasgow:
“It was a conscious decision to make a record that sounded Scottish. I hate it when people sing in American accents. Or think they’re German. There’s a sense of shame attached to being Scottish. Growing up, I was embarrassed by the Proclaimers, Rab C Nesbit, bag pipes. I saw Kurt Cobain on MTV and that was it! Getting older, you look to your own identity to create more honest art”

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Ronald is refreshingly grounded and deadpans:
“I’m not deluded enough to think I can become a pop star off of minimalist drone music. Making money is not a priority. Shouldn’t music be free? CDs, selling music – they’re all imposed business models.”

Forever the Modernist, he’s already got his sights on the future:
“The label wants me to promote this record more but I’m so keen to start working on new music. Touring’s new enough to be exciting but it’s still work. I’m quite up for doing a Brian Wilson and sending out other people to play my songs…”

remember_remember_interview%204.jpg

All photos by Ken Street

Chatsworth Road, earmarked in the ‘Secret Streets’ feature of Time Out some twelve months ago, viagra lies deep in the E5 environs of Hackney- between Millfields Park and Homerton Hospital. Since it was said to be ‘bearing the fruits of the slow gentrification process,’ it seems the high street is ripe for development. With the arrival of such bijou retailers and eateries as Book Box and L’Epicerie, change is certainly in the air. As an actress friend and young Mum in the area recently put it: ‘it’s all gone a bit Guardian reader,’ the latest manifestation of which is the bid to reinstate the erstwhile street market.

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Illustrations by Krishna Malla

Never one to bypass a strikingly rainbow-fonted poster in my local newsagent, especially not one bearing the promise of a shopping opportunity, I found myself drawn down to Chats Palace on the rainy evening of 14th July. The former Homerton library turned community arts venue had generously offered its premises free of charge for an open meeting of the Chatsworth Road Traders and Residents Association. A veritable cross-section of the neighbourhood populace, fifty or so strong, had assembled to hear the results of the spring opinion poll. But with Spitalfields, Broadway and Ridley Road already doing a roaring trade in the borough, does East London really need another market? Judging by 863 responses to 1200 leaflets distributed, of which 96% voted in the affirmative, it would seem so.

I tracked down campaign front man Ashley Parsons in the bar, post-Power Point presentation, to get the lowdown on launching a market from scratch.

What first inspired or provoked the idea to mount the campaign?

Well it certainly didn’t start out as a carefully hatched plot. It’s been a decidely organic affair so far, inspired mainly, I think, by a collective sense of pride in the local high street and aspirations for its future success as the community’s favourite place to shop.

0812%20chatsworth1.jpg
Photo: Joe Lord

I’d say that if there was any ‘provocation’ it was that many of the traders at these 2008 meetings seemed to agree that business on the street was slower than last year – as on high streets everywhere. But the residents attending these meetings were equally concerned at the number of closed shop units on Chatsworth Road, particularly when it became apparent that Tesco was planning to massively expand the nearby Morning Lane store and that the Council were considering imposing a new tax on shopkeepers using the forecourts in front of their shops. So there was a general sense of concern that a much-loved independent high street – and a distinctive community hub to boot – was at risk of further decline. There was a very positive sense of, ‘let’s try and do something about it ourselves’.

Have you played a part in similar grassroots/ community ventures in the past?

A few years ago I was involved with Open Dalston when it was trying to prevent the demolition of the Four Aces / Labyrinth / Theatre building, and a pair of Georgian townhouses, on Dalston Lane. The campaign questioned whether the Council’s plans for the Dalston Junction area were sustainable or appropriate, and proposed a different style of development to that which you now see shooting up into the sky. It was gutting to see that particular campaign fail. But the act of mounting the campaign did result in Open Dalston going on to become a fully-fledged community organisation. Ever since that campaign they’ve been impressively committed and imaginative in trying to engage with their local community as the future of that area is fiercely debated.

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How is the Chatsworth Road Market campaign different?

One of the invigorating things about it has been that it’s not a ‘no campaign’ working against someone else’s clock. It’s much more of a ‘yes’ campaign. And, to an extent, it’s been afforded the luxury of not having to react to outside events. Having said that, the campaign is, of course, going to face challenges, and it may be harder to motivate people without a sense of immediate jeopardy. But the high number of people who have attended our meetings and participated in the survey does suggest a really proactive community spirit.

When & why did the original Chatsworth Road market close?

The consensus seems to be that it closed down around 1989 or 1990. But the anecdotal evidence as to why it closed varies. Some traders who have been on the street for decades described a prolonged process of a new brick pavement being laid and re-laid, and causing such chaos and disruption to pedestrians and to the stalls’ ability to trade that the market died as a result of the work. Other residents have reported that the stalls simply declined in number and quality throughout the late ’80s. It’s certainly a story that needs to be told at some point. It’s amazing how quickly things get forgotten.

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What would the major benefits of a new market be for the local community?

A new market could – and I stress ‘could’ – be a great way of improving shopping choices for local residents, which in turn might persuade more people that they don’t need to use supermarkets any more. It could bring people back to the high street and increase passing trade, benefiting all the existing businesses as well as encouraging new ones to open and fill empty shop units. It could help ensure the future of the high street as a community hub by regularly bringing together all parts of what is a hugely diverse community. It could allow more opportunities for people to set up and develop new businesses without committing to a shop lease. It could be fun!

Why is this local high street so crucial, would you say?

Firstly, because the surrounding residential area is originally based on this high street being the focal point. Many high streets are essentially lines of shops that grew up along major highways in or out of cities – they can feel transitional, cramped and chaotic. But Chatsworth Road was nothing but a field path before it was laid out by Victorian developers in the 1860s & 70s. What you see now is no accident – it was purpose built to serve a planned community, conceived as a public space with handsome proportions and wide pavements where people would shop, stroll and meet. It was built as the heart of an aspirational new working class suburb. So, for starters, it’s an unusually good urban space.

Secondly it’s important because Chatsworth Road’s renegade charm is rooted in its independence. There are very few chain names on the street, it’s almost entirely a centre of entrepreneurship, in an age of ever-expanding supermarkets and identikit city centres.

As soon the sense of community is diluted it becomes a transitional space, a way to get somewhere else rather than a destination in its own right. I’d suggest that a community-led market could just be another way of safeguarding it, another tactic for helping ensure it thrives for another 130 years, and doesn’t contract any further. For me, it’s not about fixing something that’s broken, so much as taking out a community insurance policy.

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Are you ready to pass on the baton to a new line-up of committee members in September, and will you continue to be involved?

Absolutely, yes. Personally, I’ll probably take a step back after ensuring that the report on the survey is published and properly publicised, because I have to get on with earning a crust. But I’ll help out where I can because I think it’s got great potential to bring the area together.

I certainly hope that by the end of 2009 you’ll see a new Market Committee established with new faces taking things forward. That will probably be the focus of the next big meeting in Autumn 2009 – offering people the chance to shape the Association and to get more involved. People can keep an eye on the website for details of that meeting – www.chatsworthroade5.co.uk. Or they can email- info@chatsworthroade5.co.uk – and ask to be added to the mailing list. If enough people step forward there’s a great chance of making a new Chatsworth market happen.

DM4.jpg
With artists collecting in the shadowy crevices of the world’s biggest cities in search of space on the cheap it goes without saying that they tend to be found on the frothy crest of the wave of gentrification. A canary of sorts, viagra artists are often trailed by real estate speculators and big businesses, lurking and waiting like stock brokers for their chance to turn a quick buck with something they see as nothing more than a commodity. They stand apart, at the ready to raise property taxes and muscle out what is often the cultural backbone of these city-bordering towns and pat one another on the back for “cleaning it up”. But in the heart of Dalston last month, I finally saw the merging of two social layers into something not only mutually beneficial but unselfconsciously beautiful.
DM1.jpg
It began when experimental architecture collective EXZYT saw an opportunity to pirate an unused lot behind Dalston Kingsland Junction to build a 16 meter high temporary mill where land artist Agnes Denes had planted a lush wheat field thus giving life to an endless germination of ideas, all with the intent of bringing the local community together and raising issues of sustainability, economy and ownership. It played host to workshops, screenings, music, dance
DM2.jpg
In a call and response kind of ……. EXZYT, commissioned by the Barbican as part of Radical Nature, literally built upon Denes’ concept by turning the disused lot (often the hive of criminal activity in cities) into the site for a wind powered mill. EXYZT’s wild haired and bighearted architect/artist Nicolas Henninger and Celine Condorelli, whose sleep in tents amid the mill’s scaffolding, refer their temporary autonomous zones as “pirate architecture”. The idea being to create spaces which, rather than dictate its use, leaves it open to its neighbors to determine how it will be used. And use it they did! Try to keep up…
The mill was used to grind flour which was used to bake bread in ovens which open to the public. Anyone who desired to came and baked whatever they brought, drank from the wooden open air bar which twinkled with wind power and catered to a nightly flocking of local families and hipsters alike drawn to the wheat gazing deck chairs and nightly DJ, whose equipment was powered by cycles. No shortage of well developed cycle muscles in this neighborhood!
DM3.jpg
Every day saw a new manifestation of the space. A lab coat wearing urban psychoanalyst did research by asking questions like “if Dalston wear a fruit what would it be?”. Scarecrows were created to protect the wheat field, a gaffer tape poet pronounced his thoughts across the wood planks, and a local currency was baked with the help of world renowned baker Dan Lepard Even the super cool owner of local but now defunk jazz bar 4 Aces Club was a nightly fixture, ready to recount tales of its experimental jazz heyday in the 60′s staging the likes of Desmond Dekker, Jimmy Cliff, Bob Marley, The Sex Pistols and Bob Dylan.
And in the most elegant example of this project’s cycle, Alexandre Bettler hosted a workshop in which participants could bake everything from the utensils and trays upon which their dinner would be served.
Although many a plea was voiced for this amazing catalyst to remain, it’s clear from all the smiling faces present that beyond the connections made, thoughts provoked and fun had was the distinctive flavor of Dalston’s pride.

Categories ,architecture, ,art, ,bar, ,barbican, ,dance, ,DJ, ,landscape, ,nature, ,workshop

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Amelia’s Magazine | Fountain of Youth: A profile on photographer Lucia Pang

Looking at the work of Lucia Pang will no doubt bring you to the conclusion that this photographer has an incredible eye and talent. When I tell you in earnest, this that she is a mere fifteen years old, you might spit up your tea upon the screen and sit with your mouth agape for five minutes or so. That’s what I did.

Trying to remember what I was doing at 15 didn’t produce much, so I can assume I was producing nothing of importance aside from a colourful disciplinary record at school on account of my aptitude for building bombs out of the Science cupboard supplies. Lucia Pang, however, who was born and lives in Australia is fast producing a portfolio of work that could rival her older and professional contemporaries. It’s pretty exciting to think what this girl is going to be doing in ten years time.

But perhaps what makes these photographs so remarkable is her youth. Girls floating in rivers, dancing in the sunlight and playing in the forest authentically captures the spirit of being a young teenager, enamoured with the simple pleasures of life. Which isn’t meant at all to be patronising, fashion photographers are constantly on a quest to capture the abundance of youth and failing for the inherent lack of authenticity in their work, whereas for Lucia Pang, none of her photographs appear to be contrived or pre-meditated. The scenes unfold organically. Technically, the work is flawless which is all down to a prodigal talent on behalf of the photographer.

“I grew in Australia in a beautiful environment and I was surrounded by inspiring scenery. Come to think of it, I’m quite lucky to have places that will satisfy my photographic thirst.” Lucia tells me by email. “I loved the idea of art when I was younger. I like the fact that you could express any emotion without the use of words and that interested me. I’ve had a camera around my neck for a while before I got into photography seriously.”

For someone who is already so proficient, what does Pang want to do next? “In the future, I want to inspire lots and lots of people to do what they love. I want them to hopefully turn to my photographs and think they can achieve their dreams too. I want to shoot for various labels and companies but I’m still young. I dream a lot. Right now, I’m just enjoying what I do.”

Lucia’s website can be found here


Categories ,australia, ,fashion, ,landscape, ,lucia pang, ,photography, ,teenagers, ,water

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Amelia’s Magazine | Artist Interview with Johan Björkegren

Stephanie Jayne Price‘s slick, more about futuristic collection at Northumbria University‘s Graduate Fashion Week show was a real winner – combining masculine tailoring with feminine quirks. I loved the lines that the creations formed, stuff and the sophistication of each of the pieces – so much so that I couldn’t wait to have a chat with Miss Price and find out what is was all about.

What are the benefits of showing at Graduate Fashion Week?
GFW is an excellent platform for young designers to exhibit work to the industry. It’s a great opportunity to see what the other schools have been up to and ultimately the future of British fashion. For the individual it provides a chance to show your collection to a much wider audience. After spending a year putting your heart and soul into your work, and GFW offers a prestigious and professional setting to exhibit your work. It’s a real honour!

?Northumbria students put on a show at the Baltic in Newcastle before heading for Earl’s Court – how did the two venues compare?
Oh the Baltic is a wonderful space! I have such a soft spot for it! It was our first fashion show, and it was the entire year; only 25 show at GFW, so it was a really nice way to see all the collections together. After seeing bits and bobs around the studio it is so exciting to see everything and everyone come together! We were really fortunate to have such a good location in Newcastle and it was done really well.
On the other hand, Graduate Fashion Week is on a far larger scale – the catwalk and the space is set up a lot differently.  The raised runway, the models, the lighting – they are more professional I guess. But, I don’t know really. I enjoyed both immensely!
?
What’s your fashion history?
My Grandma was a tailoress, she taught me to sew and it went from there. I always wanted to study fashion. I was in primary school drawing cartoons of my friends, in secondary school drawing ball gowns and making business cards for my future self! And from textiles in school, I became fascinated by it all!

?Did you get the chance to work alongside anybody in the industry during your studies?
I’ve been very lucky and done a few placements, and no doubt I’ll be doing a few more! After 1st year, I worked for a month at Philip Treacy. I’ve always had a passion for hats! To be able to meet Philip and work there was amazing! I loved it! Then during our placement year I spent three months working with [friends of Amelia’s Magazine] Emilio de la Morena. Then I worked for The Collection, a sampling and textile company, Tatty Devine and Gareth Pugh. Now, I’m really hoping to get involved with another studio before fashion week in September. I’m a bit of a geek for pattern cutting and toiling so I’d like to get stuck in to that!

What inspires you, both for this collection and generally?
Inspiration can come from just about anywhere, but for my own work I am very concept led. There is something very exciting about capturing a meaning, telling a story, and watching it direct ideas. Imagination is a wonderful thing. Generally, it can be when I’m out and about, reading, having a coffee, chatting up with friends… endless possibilities! I love visiting museums and exhibitions… My collection captures the idea of being trapped in a kaleidoscope, which stemmed from considering how we see, travelling light, and light reflecting… I ended up eventually, asking lots of people how they’d feel if they were trapped in a kaleidoscope! I’d initially been focused on building lights into the garments, and it happened for the Newcastle show – sadly there wasn’t time for the London show, but this fusion with technology is something I’d like to further.
?
Your collection mixes masculine tailoring with feminine quirks. Why did you choose the cuts/techniques that you worked with?
Until recently I never really thought about it, but you’re right! It is a bit masculine; you’ve captured it well! I’m not sure really, I think that’s my own personal taste, I’m a bit boyish in my own dress. All the geometric shapes stemmed from cutting, and distorting the body, as though being looked upon inside that kaleidoscopic world. There were lots of triangles too! Kaleidoscopes are triangular mirrors, so the cutting used triangular inserts to push and pull the cloth, and then you put it on a body and you get a whole new dimension!
 
The colour palette is very simple – why didn’t you use colour? (This is a question, not a criticism!)
This was inspired by the concept as well. Since it was based on light, I avoided black – black absorbs light. I wear a lot of black, so I wanted to stay clear of it for this concept. White was too clinical, too bright, so everything was toned down. I wanted it to be soft and unobtrusive and to be honest colour stresses me out a bit! I’m learning to deal with it haha!
 
What did you like about Northumbria and Newcastle? How’s the fashion scene in the Toon?
Well, when I was looking to choose a University, Northumbria was the last place on my mind. I was set on getting far away from home, until I reluctantly came to the open day for Northumbria 5 years ago, and from that day it felt like home. I sat in the old design school and was inspired. I thought, ‘I actually quite like this place… can I stay?!’
I don’t know, is there a scene?!? I haven’t really left the studio much this year to know! Haha!
?
Which fashion designers do you look to for inspiration?
Years ago I started reading about ‘conceptual’ designers, and I have a fascination with Viktor & Rolf. I’d really like to meet them. I think we’d have nice chats! Haha! I’d really like to work for them! I also have admiration for Hussein Chalayan and Rei Kawakubo. Heroes I guess! I’d like to work for both of these as well. I’m a bit of a dreamer!

Did your collection receive positive attention at GFW?
Well I’ve had some lovely blogs and feedback at GFW. On a different occasion I’d been able to present it to a small panel at the BFC and they gave me some really good advice and said some really lovely things.  I was flattered they liked my cutting, and I’ve had feedback from other names from industry with similar comments and interest.

?What do the next few months hold for Stephanie Jayne Price?
At the minute I’m looking into undertaking an MA at the University of Kingston. I met the course leader the other day and she is wonderful! I’m really hoping to continue with the integration of lights and technology fused with this style of cutting and silhouette I’ve developed over the year. Fingers crossed for that! Hopefully I’ll also get involved with some studios to get some more experience – doing some cutting for them, maybe some freelance work. There are a few things to consider really. The world is my oyster!

Stephanie Jayne Price‘s slick, adiposity futuristic collection at Northumbria University‘s Graduate Fashion Week show was a real winner – combining masculine tailoring with feminine quirks. I loved the lines that the creations formed, and the sophistication of each of the pieces – so much so that I couldn’t wait to have a chat with Miss Price and find out what is was all about.

What are the benefits of showing at Graduate Fashion Week?
GFW is an excellent platform for young designers to exhibit work to the industry. It’s a great opportunity to see what the other schools have been up to and ultimately the future of British fashion. For the individual it provides a chance to show your collection to a much wider audience. After spending a year putting your heart and soul into your work, GFW offers a prestigious and professional setting to exhibit your work. It’s a real honour!


Photographs by Matt Bramford

?Northumbria students put on a show at the Baltic in Newcastle before heading for Earl’s Court – how did the two venues compare?
Oh the Baltic is a wonderful space! I have such a soft spot for it! It was our first fashion show, and it was the entire year; only 25 show at GFW, so it was a really nice way to see all the collections together. After seeing bits and bobs around the studio it is so exciting to see everything and everyone come together! We were really fortunate to have such a good location in Newcastle and it was done really well.
On the other hand, Graduate Fashion Week is on a far larger scale – the catwalk and the space is set up a lot differently.  The raised runway, the models, the lighting – they are more professional I guess. But, I don’t know really. I enjoyed both immensely!
?
What’s your fashion history?
My Grandma was a tailoress, she taught me to sew and it went from there. I always wanted to study fashion. I was in primary school drawing cartoons of my friends, in secondary school drawing ball gowns and making business cards for my future self! And from textiles in school, I became fascinated by it all!

?Did you get the chance to work alongside anybody in the industry during your studies?
I’ve been very lucky and done a few placements, and no doubt I’ll be doing a few more! After 1st year, I worked for a month at Philip Treacy. I’ve always had a passion for hats! To be able to meet Philip and work there was amazing! I loved it! Then during our placement year I spent three months working with [friends of Amelia’s Magazine] Emilio de la Morena. Then I worked for The Collection, a sampling and textile company, Tatty Devine and Gareth Pugh. Now, I’m really hoping to get involved with another studio before fashion week in September. I’m a bit of a geek for pattern cutting and toiling so I’d like to get stuck in to that!

What inspires you, both for this collection and generally?
Inspiration can come from just about anywhere, but for my own work I am very concept led. There is something very exciting about capturing a meaning, telling a story, and watching it direct ideas. Imagination is a wonderful thing. Generally, it can be when I’m out and about, reading, having a coffee, chatting up with friends… endless possibilities! I love visiting museums and exhibitions… My collection captures the idea of being trapped in a kaleidoscope, which stemmed from considering how we see, travelling light, and light reflecting… I ended up eventually, asking lots of people how they’d feel if they were trapped in a kaleidoscope! I’d initially been focused on building lights into the garments, and it happened for the Newcastle show – sadly there wasn’t time for the London show, but this fusion with technology is something I’d like to further.
?
Your collection mixes masculine tailoring with feminine quirks. Why did you choose the cuts/techniques that you worked with?
Until recently I never really thought about it, but you’re right! It is a bit masculine; you’ve captured it well! I’m not sure really, I think that’s my own personal taste, I’m a bit boyish in my own dress. All the geometric shapes stemmed from cutting, and distorting the body, as though being looked upon inside that kaleidoscopic world. There were lots of triangles too! Kaleidoscopes are triangular mirrors, so the cutting used triangular inserts to push and pull the cloth, and then you put it on a body and you get a whole new dimension!


 
The colour palette is very simple – why didn’t you use colour? (This is a question, not a criticism!)
This was inspired by the concept as well. Since it was based on light, I avoided black – black absorbs light. I wear a lot of black, so I wanted to stay clear of it for this concept. White was too clinical, too bright, so everything was toned down. I wanted it to be soft and unobtrusive and to be honest colour stresses me out a bit! I’m learning to deal with it haha!
 
What did you like about Northumbria and Newcastle? How’s the fashion scene in the Toon?
Well, when I was looking to choose a University, Northumbria was the last place on my mind. I was set on getting far away from home, until I reluctantly came to the open day for Northumbria 5 years ago, and from that day it felt like home. I sat in the old design school and was inspired. I thought, ‘I actually quite like this place… can I stay?!’
I don’t know, is there a scene?!? I haven’t really left the studio much this year to know! Haha!


?
Which fashion designers do you look to for inspiration?
Years ago I started reading about ‘conceptual’ designers, and I have a fascination with Viktor & Rolf. I’d really like to meet them. I think we’d have nice chats! Haha! I’d really like to work for them! I also have admiration for Hussein Chalayan and Rei Kawakubo. Heroes I guess! I’d like to work for both of these as well. I’m a bit of a dreamer!

Did your collection receive positive attention at GFW?
Well I’ve had some lovely blogs and feedback at GFW. On a different occasion I’d been able to present it to a small panel at the BFC and they gave me some really good advice and said some really lovely things.  I was flattered they liked my cutting, and I’ve had feedback from other names from industry with similar comments and interest.

?What do the next few months hold for Stephanie Jayne Price?
At the minute I’m looking into undertaking an MA at the University of Kingston. I met the course leader the other day and she is wonderful! I’m really hoping to continue with the integration of lights and technology fused with this style of cutting and silhouette I’ve developed over the year. Fingers crossed for that! Hopefully I’ll also get involved with some studios to get some more experience – doing some cutting for them, maybe some freelance work. There are a few things to consider really. The world is my oyster!

Stephanie Jayne Price‘s slick, buy futuristic collection at Northumbria University‘s Graduate Fashion Week show was a real winner – combining masculine tailoring with feminine quirks. I loved the lines that the creations formed, and the sophistication of each of the pieces – so much so that I couldn’t wait to have a chat with Miss Price and find out what is was all about.

What are the benefits of showing at Graduate Fashion Week?
GFW is an excellent platform for young designers to exhibit work to the industry. It’s a great opportunity to see what the other schools have been up to and ultimately the future of British fashion. For the individual it provides a chance to show your collection to a much wider audience. After spending a year putting your heart and soul into your work, GFW offers a prestigious and professional setting to exhibit your work. It’s a real honour!


Photographs by Matt Bramford

?Northumbria students put on a show at the Baltic in Newcastle before heading for Earl’s Court – how did the two venues compare?
Oh the Baltic is a wonderful space! I have such a soft spot for it! It was our first fashion show, and it was the entire year; only 25 show at GFW, so it was a really nice way to see all the collections together. After seeing bits and bobs around the studio it is so exciting to see everything and everyone come together! We were really fortunate to have such a good location in Newcastle and it was done really well.
On the other hand, Graduate Fashion Week is on a far larger scale – the catwalk and the space is set up a lot differently.  The raised runway, the models, the lighting – they are more professional I guess. But, I don’t know really. I enjoyed both immensely!
?
What’s your fashion history?
My Grandma was a tailoress, she taught me to sew and it went from there. I always wanted to study fashion. I was in primary school drawing cartoons of my friends, in secondary school drawing ball gowns and making business cards for my future self! And from textiles in school, I became fascinated by it all!

?Did you get the chance to work alongside anybody in the industry during your studies?
I’ve been very lucky and done a few placements, and no doubt I’ll be doing a few more! After 1st year, I worked for a month at Philip Treacy. I’ve always had a passion for hats! To be able to meet Philip and work there was amazing! I loved it! Then during our placement year I spent three months working with [friends of Amelia’s Magazine] Emilio de la Morena. Then I worked for The Collection, a sampling and textile company, Tatty Devine and Gareth Pugh. Now, I’m really hoping to get involved with another studio before fashion week in September. I’m a bit of a geek for pattern cutting and toiling so I’d like to get stuck in to that!

What inspires you, both for this collection and generally?
Inspiration can come from just about anywhere, but for my own work I am very concept led. There is something very exciting about capturing a meaning, telling a story, and watching it direct ideas. Imagination is a wonderful thing. Generally, it can be when I’m out and about, reading, having a coffee, chatting up with friends… endless possibilities! I love visiting museums and exhibitions… My collection captures the idea of being trapped in a kaleidoscope, which stemmed from considering how we see, travelling light, and light reflecting… I ended up eventually, asking lots of people how they’d feel if they were trapped in a kaleidoscope! I’d initially been focused on building lights into the garments, and it happened for the Newcastle show – sadly there wasn’t time for the London show, but this fusion with technology is something I’d like to further.
?
Your collection mixes masculine tailoring with feminine quirks. Why did you choose the cuts/techniques that you worked with?
Until recently I never really thought about it, but you’re right! It is a bit masculine; you’ve captured it well! I’m not sure really, I think that’s my own personal taste, I’m a bit boyish in my own dress. All the geometric shapes stemmed from cutting, and distorting the body, as though being looked upon inside that kaleidoscopic world. There were lots of triangles too! Kaleidoscopes are triangular mirrors, so the cutting used triangular inserts to push and pull the cloth, and then you put it on a body and you get a whole new dimension!


 
The colour palette is very simple – why didn’t you use colour? (This is a question, not a criticism!)
This was inspired by the concept as well. Since it was based on light, I avoided black – black absorbs light. I wear a lot of black, so I wanted to stay clear of it for this concept. White was too clinical, too bright, so everything was toned down. I wanted it to be soft and unobtrusive and to be honest colour stresses me out a bit! I’m learning to deal with it haha!
 
What did you like about Northumbria and Newcastle? How’s the fashion scene in the Toon?
Well, when I was looking to choose a University, Northumbria was the last place on my mind. I was set on getting far away from home, until I reluctantly came to the open day for Northumbria 5 years ago, and from that day it felt like home. I sat in the old design school and was inspired. I thought, ‘I actually quite like this place… can I stay?!’
I don’t know, is there a scene?!? I haven’t really left the studio much this year to know! Haha!


?
Which fashion designers do you look to for inspiration?
Years ago I started reading about ‘conceptual’ designers, and I have a fascination with Viktor & Rolf. I’d really like to meet them. I think we’d have nice chats! Haha! I’d really like to work for them! I also have admiration for Hussein Chalayan and Rei Kawakubo. Heroes I guess! I’d like to work for both of these as well. I’m a bit of a dreamer!

Did your collection receive positive attention at GFW?
Well I’ve had some lovely blogs and feedback at GFW. On a different occasion I’d been able to present it to a small panel at the BFC and they gave me some really good advice and said some really lovely things.  I was flattered they liked my cutting, and I’ve had feedback from other names from industry with similar comments and interest.

?What do the next few months hold for Stephanie Jayne Price?
At the minute I’m looking into undertaking an MA at the University of Kingston. I met the course leader the other day and she is wonderful! I’m really hoping to continue with the integration of lights and technology fused with this style of cutting and silhouette I’ve developed over the year. Fingers crossed for that! Hopefully I’ll also get involved with some studios to get some more experience – doing some cutting for them, maybe some freelance work. There are a few things to consider really. The world is my oyster!

Illustrator Johan Björkegren talks to Amelia’s Magazine about his relationship to Robert Crumb and the organic nature of drawing landscapes. As Johan’s production is nearly entirely composed of detailed black and white charcoaled drawings, thumb this appeared to be the logical place to start our conversation…

Do you mainly draw with a black and white colour scheme?

Yes I almost always only work in black and white. The use of lines and textures to describe the form and expressions are the things I am interested in and not so much the colours. A few months ago I bought some oilcolors and started to paint, cheap which I have not done in years. I think working with colours is really hard.

What do you find harder about working with colours than in black and white?

I think Colours are harder becouse its another choice to make. Its a whole other thing to consider when describing form, side effects expression or a texture with lines. And I really have not found the right material that I like. I have worked with colours, but I dont think I have really found the right way to use them yet.

How did the series of portraitse develop?

As I worked with people and their expressions in some of my landscape drawings, I began to find it interesting to focus only on their faces.

Are these characters based on people from life?

Both yes and no. The faces are not portraits of a real life person, but they are inspired by people I know or have seen. I like how you fantasise about pictures of people you never have or will meet. You make their personality up yourself. I make them and their personalities out while i work. I am also fascinated by hair and and the structure of it and how to draw it. I also like the way it expresses ones idea of your personality.

What is it that interests you about populated and unpopulated landscapes?

Faces and landscapes are the same I think. Even when I draw pictures from my mind, its something all can relate to. In the populated landscapes I work with the people in the drawings and their relation to the landscape. In the unpopulated it is more of yourself going into the landscape and another dimension. Now I work more with the unfinished picture as a way to also step into the picture and make the drawing process more alive in the picture.

Which artists or illustrators inspire you?

Many people say that my work reminds about Robert Crumb, and thats right. Im a big fan of him and his technique. I also like Henry Darger and Edward Kienholz. I also get a lot of inpiration from film makers such as Werner Herzog. People who live tough for their works and for whom its a question about life and death.

Could you talk a little bit about Robert Crumb’s Techniques and your own?

Yes, its hard to talk about your idols, I think you can see that I am influenced by the underground comics of the 60s and 70s. Robert is one of the most skilled artists I think. I’m more in to his style than the stories. I like the way he describes forms and the way he works with faces and expressions. It was when I saw the movie “Crumb” that I really got to like his work. I think that my own technique is most like his in the way to describe forms and that its all a little ugly.

What first interested you about working with charcoal? How did you come to use this material?

When I started as a illustrator, I worked only with with ink, but I grew tired of it quite fast, I think that you can get much more expression with charcoal, ink is too sharp I think, charcoal makes a much more living drawing. However I still use ink for some things I draw, typography and in my smaller sketchy works, but not for the bigger drawings.

You have had numerous commissions do you see yourself solely as an illustrator who experiments with Graphic Design?

I see myself as an artist that does comissions, rather than an illustrator sometimes doing free work. I like working with commissions becouse it is a whole other thing than free work. The free work is more meditative – you dont have to think about an assignment. Whereas with commissions you have to relate to the project and the “uppdragsgivare” which I think is fun and challenging, you have to relate to something else than yourself.

I have a bachelors degree in Graphic design from Beckmans college of design, and I’m really interested in graphic design and typography. I like commissions where I can work with both.

Do the landscapes come from your imagination or do you use photographs of places you have or have not travelled to?

I make them out as I draw. Landscapes are so organic, you can build up the structures as you draw out of your idea. I never use photos for the landscapes, some become inspired from memories of pictures I have seen and memories from my travels.

What is your process for deciding what type of landscape to draw?

If I get an idea that I think works, I start to draw, and if it is a good idea, you can get it down on paper quite fast. Otherwise I tear the paper to pieces and start all over again.

Is everything hand-drawn or do you occasionally use the computer?

Most is hand drawn, in my free works I never edit the pictures. In the illustrations I use the computer to make a good and working composition, sometimes but not often I use it for typography and graphic elements.

What interests you about typography?

Communication and how the letterforms can change the meaning of words. With illustrated text it is more abstract than my other drawings, its interesting to work with forms. I like the decorative side and the forms of more functional typefaces. The function and aesthetics of the text body itself is also interesting.

Categories ,artist, ,Charcoal, ,Graphic Design, ,illustrator, ,Johan Björkegren, ,landscape, ,portrait, ,portraits, ,Robert Crumb, ,sweden, ,typography

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Amelia’s Magazine | Cambridge School of Art Cut Grass BA Photography Graduate Show 2011 Review

Cambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Cut Grass logo

The invigilators of the Cambridge School of Art show (part of Anglia Ruskin University) were very eager to deliver an explanation for the artwork on display and thrust a lovely screenprinted paper bag with the Cut Grass logo into my hands. Nothing like being proactive! I was also very taken with their bold Cut Grass poster designs.

Cambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Ben WilsonCambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Ben WilsonCambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Ben WilsonCambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Ben Wilson
Ben Wilson had layered some spooky faces in acetate below some much less successful manipulated photography.

Mary Humphrey Roma families
Mary Humphrey Roma
There were nice portraits of Roma families from Mary Humphrey – shot in Transylvania.

Cambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Mate Dobray's Starchild
Cambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-005
I was quite transfixed by Mate Dobray‘s Starchild diptych – two huge faces manipulated to highlight the features that we respond to as attractive, this but done so in a way that they arouse a slight feeling of repulsion. Overly large eyes, salve it seems, can look freaky.

Cambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Mark Box's Castles
Cambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Mark Box's Castles
I’ll always be a sucker for a bit of suburban documentary, so I liked Mark Box‘s Castles, 2011 – a series putting trees firmly in the forefront of suburbia.

Cambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Tracey Jones
Tracey Jones is clearly a fan of photo manipulation – her weird treasure boxes featured giant god-like hands hovering over game pieces.

Cambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Stephen Bonser
Stephen Bonser went for panoramic views of Cambridge streets on his long sheet of landscape photography.

Cambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Jessica GibbonCambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Jessica GibbonCambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Jessica Gibbon
Jessica Gibbon had found a new use for discarded family photographs – reappropriating them to create a new history for herself, one in which her childhood was much happier than the reality.

Categories ,2011, ,Anglia Ruskin University, ,Ben Wilson, ,Cambridge School of Art, ,Castles, ,CGI, ,collage, ,Cut Grass, ,Free Range, ,Jessica Gibbon, ,landscape, ,Mark Box, ,Mary Humphrey, ,Mate Dobray, ,photography, ,review, ,Roma, ,Starchild, ,Stephen Bonser, ,Tracey Jones, ,Transylvania

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Amelia’s Magazine | Cambridge School of Art Cut Grass BA Photography Graduate Show 2011 Review

Cambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Cut Grass logo

The invigilators of the Cambridge School of Art show (part of Anglia Ruskin University) were very eager to deliver an explanation for the artwork on display and thrust a lovely screenprinted paper bag with the Cut Grass logo into my hands. Nothing like being proactive! I was also very taken with their bold Cut Grass poster designs.

Cambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Ben WilsonCambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Ben WilsonCambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Ben WilsonCambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Ben Wilson
Ben Wilson had layered some spooky faces in acetate below some much less successful manipulated photography.

Mary Humphrey Roma families
Mary Humphrey Roma
There were nice portraits of Roma families from Mary Humphrey – shot in Transylvania.

Cambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Mate Dobray's Starchild
Cambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-005
I was quite transfixed by Mate Dobray‘s Starchild diptych – two huge faces manipulated to highlight the features that we respond to as attractive, this but done so in a way that they arouse a slight feeling of repulsion. Overly large eyes, salve it seems, can look freaky.

Cambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Mark Box's Castles
Cambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Mark Box's Castles
I’ll always be a sucker for a bit of suburban documentary, so I liked Mark Box‘s Castles, 2011 – a series putting trees firmly in the forefront of suburbia.

Cambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Tracey Jones
Tracey Jones is clearly a fan of photo manipulation – her weird treasure boxes featured giant god-like hands hovering over game pieces.

Cambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Stephen Bonser
Stephen Bonser went for panoramic views of Cambridge streets on his long sheet of landscape photography.

Cambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Jessica GibbonCambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Jessica GibbonCambridge College of Art degree show Free Range 2011-Jessica Gibbon
Jessica Gibbon had found a new use for discarded family photographs – reappropriating them to create a new history for herself, one in which her childhood was much happier than the reality.

Categories ,2011, ,Anglia Ruskin University, ,Ben Wilson, ,Cambridge School of Art, ,Castles, ,CGI, ,collage, ,Cut Grass, ,Free Range, ,Jessica Gibbon, ,landscape, ,Mark Box, ,Mary Humphrey, ,Mate Dobray, ,photography, ,review, ,Roma, ,Starchild, ,Stephen Bonser, ,Tracey Jones, ,Transylvania

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Amelia’s Magazine | Art Listings

Time and Place

Bridget Macdonal
New paintings and drawings from the artist’s new figurative and landscape work.

Art First, online abortion 1st Floor, 9 Cork St, W1S 3LL
Apr 28 – May 21, 2009

27a.jpg


Where Eagles Tremble

Vic Reeves
TV comedian Vic Reeve’s art work mixes the surreal and the mundane in an amusing way,
the exhibition features a new series of paintings that focus on aviation.

Mews of Mayfair
, 10-11 Lancashire Court, New Bond Street, Mayfair W1S 1EY
2nd April – 29th April 2009
Weekdays 10am – 6pm

reeves1.jpg


Optimistic Immigrants

Performances and films from a group of London based immigrants as Part of the East End Film Festival 2009.

Vibe Live and V Gallery, The Vibe Bar, The Truman Brewery. 91 Brick Lane, London, E1 6QL
Main event: Tuesday 28th April 7-11pm

Tickets £7. £5.50 concessions.

oim.jpg


Avoision

Dan Mort
This is the artist’s first solo exhibition with Museum 52 gallery.

Museum 52, 52 Redchurch Street, London E2 7DP
20th March – 30th April 2009, Wednesday – Saturday 11am – 6 pm or by appointment

t1.jpg


Still Life

Robin Conway
An exhibition of stunning underwater photography.

Red Gate Gallery
, 209a Coldharbour Lane, Brixton, London SW9 8RU
24th- 30th Apr 09, Monday – Saturday: 2.30 pm – 6.30 pm
Free

photographer.jpg


Swedish Fashion: Exploring A New Identity

This exhibition showcases fashion and jewellery from a group of Swedish designers.

Fashion and Textile Museum, 83 Bermondsey Street, Tower Bridge, SE1 3XF
6 February 2009 – 17 May 2009, from 11am – 6pm
How Much: £5 tickets, £3 Concessions

111.jpg

Categories ,Art First, ,Aviation, ,Avoision, ,Brick Lane, ,Bridget Macdonal, ,Dan Mort, ,Drawings, ,East End Film Festival, ,Fashion, ,films, ,Identity, ,Jwellery, ,Landscape, ,London, ,Mews of Mayfair, ,Museum 52, ,New Paintings, ,Optimistic Immigrants, ,Performances, ,Red Gate Gallery, ,Robin Conway, ,Still Life, ,Surreal, ,Swedish Designers, ,Swedish Fashion, ,Textile, ,The Truman Brewery, ,The Vibe Bar, ,TV comedian, ,Underwater Photography, ,V Gallery, ,Vic Reeves, ,Work

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