Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Menswear Day Catwalk Review: James Small


James Small S/S 2012 by Milly Jackson

I arrived at the James Small show pretty early – such is the bonkers London Fashion Week schedule that some shows overlap and then you’re left with huge gaps in your day. I joined the small but perfectly formed queue and waited for a pal to arrive. The show was delayed, prescription I was informed, because of the knock-on effect of late-runners throughout the day. The queue eventually began moving a mere 20 minutes late, and just as we were about to be let in, we were halted by an impossibly gorgeous PR girl. Her colleague came over and whispered ‘Kate’s imminent, we should hold the queue‘. Now, I don’t know if it was the pint I’d just enjoyed or the onset stir-crazy sensation I was experiencing after 6 days of shows, but I started sweating profusely. It couldn’t be, could it? ‘Calm down, Matt’ I internally repeated. It can’t be. She wouldn’t. It might be a code word. It might be Kate Adie.


Kate Moss by Antonia Parker

Eventually, after much discussion, it was decided that we should be allowed in because this mysterious Kate hadn’t yet arrived. We were escorted individually up the grand staircase of the Freemasons Hall, this Vauxhall Fashion Scout venue, and assigned seats on the front row. Seating was heavily policed, and I enjoyed the personal escort, but it was taking bloody ages and another show downstairs was set to take place pretty soon afterwards. Jaime Winstone, looking incredible with a silver grandma up-do and vertiginous heels, entered the room and was seated with little fuss. Now I love Jaime Winstone, but if ‘Kate’ was a codename for Jaime Winstone, I was about to go berserk.


Kate Moss by Claire Kearns


Kate Moss by Gilly Rochester

The personal escort service soon turned into a scrum; somebody had clearly realised that it just wasn’t practical. I let out a huge sigh as I said to my friend ‘Well, Kate clearly isn’t coming.’ ‘What?’ my friend replied, ‘she’s over there!’ I turned to my left to study the front row. Somehow I had missed the arrival of Meg Matthews, Sadie Frost, Annabelle Neilson, James Brown, Jamie Hince and… Kate Moss. Kate FREAKIN’ Moss!


All photography by Matt Bramford

There was little fuss as I struggled to fight the urge to jump out of my seat, leap across the catwalk, gather Kate up in my arms and force her to take my hand in marriage. It all happened so quickly, and of course, now Kate had arrived, the show must go on.


James Small S/S 2012 by Gabriel Ayala

It was tricky to concentrate on the show knowing that My Kate was mere feet away, but being the consummate professional that I am, I took up my camera and started to study the clothes, being carefully to take a picture of Kate in between each look. The fashion on offer was actually great, and I don’t know why I was thinking that it might not be. The secondary venue at Fashion Scout is actually much nicer – a dark wood arch divides the old stone room, dark wood lines the floor and majestic chandeliers hover above the revellers. Models appear almost out of nowhere. You do lose sight of the models as they bound through the arch, unfortunately, but this ensured enough time to snap Kate excessively.


James Small S/S 2012 by Sam Parr

Hysteria mounted thanks to the special guests: Kate and her entourage whooped and cheered every look and wolf-whistled translucent shirts, which sent roars of laughter through the room. Last season’s sharp tailoring continued this time around, but had been given a more casual feel for the discerning gentleman who manages to looking devastatingly cool without any real effort during the summer months.


James Small S/S 2012 by Milly Jackson

Small’s mainstay silk shirts had been jazzed up with the aforementioned translucency, and romantic florals with an air of Liberty were the most aesthetically appealing pieces in the collection, particularly a shirt/shorts combination with identical print. I’m not sure I’d get away with it, but the model did with aplomb.

Small‘s sharp tailoring was dressed down with white ankle-high sports socks and Vans in varying colours – when I read this on the press release I wasn’t so sure about it, but seeing it in the flesh allowed it to make sense. Rich colours: plum and royal blue, and luxe materials: silk and velvet, made this collection Small‘s most sophisticated yet. Retaining an edge above his competitors with leopard print and camouflage short shorts, it’s Small’s sharp cuts and sophisticated tailoring that really set him above the rest. That and his stellar front row, of course.

Categories ,Annabelle Neilson, ,Antonia Parker, ,catwalk, ,Claire Kearns, ,combat, ,fashion, ,Floral prints, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Front Row, ,Gabriel Ayala, ,Gilly Rochester, ,illustration, ,James Brown, ,James Small, ,Jamie Hince, ,Kate Moss, ,Leopard Print, ,liberty, ,London Fashion Week, ,Meg Matthews, ,menswear, ,MenswearSS12, ,Milly Jackson, ,review, ,S/S 2012, ,Sadie Frost, ,Sam Parr, ,Silks, ,tailoring, ,The Kills, ,Translucent, ,Vans, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Presentation Review: Craig Lawrence

Craig Lawrence S/S 2012 by Meagan Morrison

Craig Lawrence S/S 2012 by Meagan Morrison

I’m quite partial to a knitted design – one of my favourite designers is Mark Fast, order whose spun creations I yearn for, and I loved the A/W 2010 work of graduate student Phoebe Thirlwall. I’m also very fond of Craig Lawrence, whose work I have followed and celebrated, and so I was eagerly anticipating his intimate salon show at The Portico Rooms at Somerset House, the perfect surrounding for the debut of his S/S 2012 collection. An excitement it appeared that was shared by everyone else attending London Fashion Week… The queue for the presentation wound round the marble staircase of Somerset House, and snaked along the grand hall – a bit of a change from what Matt Bramford had seen the previous year.

Craig Lawrence S/S 2012

Craig Lawrence S/S 2012 – All photography courtesy of Ella Dror PR

Craig Lawrence is a London Fashion Week must-see. For six seasons, before he graduated from Central Saint Martins and set up his own label, Craig produced knitwear for the outlandish designer Gareth Pugh. He showed his debut collection for A/W 2009, which won him The British Fashion Council’s NEWGEN sponsorship. The Council’s faith and support continues, as this season sees Craig celebrating his sixth season under the sponsorship. As I was finally ushered into the room and asked to find myself a square inch of space, I spotted blogger Susie Bubble on the front row. I realised what a hot ticket this show was, and thought that maybe next year’s space should be rethought, regardless of the atmospheric surroundings. By the time the doors were closed, every seat in the room had been taken, but in this close setting, I couldn’t have asked for a better view of the clothes.

Craig Lawrence S/S 2012 - All photography courtesy of Ella Dror PR

Craig’s primary inspiration for the collection was the seaside photo sets of British documentary photographer Martin Parr. Parr is known for projects that explore modern life in England, and for his sense of humour that runs through his photos. He claims that the seaside is one of the most fascinating places for people watching, where we lose our inhibitions and where true personalities are unveiled. As the first looks of Craig’s collection were presented, the influence of the British seaside towns was clear, but rather from the depths of the sea, instead of the beach and its holiday makers. The models were enchanting sea creatures. Adorned in the metallic threads of a fisherman’s net or wrapped seaweed, in the colours of the ocean and washed up treasures and sun baked sand, with headpieces like sea coral reefs. Craig presented a rich and textured collection of knitwear in a palette of pastel and muted hues, run with metallic details.

Craig Lawrence S/S 2012

Last season’s moody palette of dark metallic blues, purples and black was replaced with a lighter, gentler combination of creams, pale mint greens and pinks. As the models swayed down the short catwalk they glistened with every step. Craig Lawrence collaborated with Swarovski Elements for this collection which gave a sparkle of luxury to his intricately knitted designs. Swarovski Pale Crystal yarns and fibres had been woven into individual pieces, which caught the bright lights of The Portico Rooms as the models revolved to face each wall of the room. The Swarovski crystals were also sewn in to other designs as pure embellishment.

Craig Lawrence S/S 2012 by Megan Thomas

Craig Lawrence S/S 2012 by Megan Thomas

It was apparently the idea of the Essex phenomenon ‘vajazzling’ that inspired Lawrence’s use of Swarovski crystal fibres for this season, but with this influence aside, it was a sophisticated and refined concept that pushed the collection to another level. Craig’s material of choice, unique Kyototex metallic yarns, keeping to the sea-theme in cream and shell colours, were woven into the designs, adding to the luxuriance and feminine appeal of each look.

Craig Lawrence S/S 2012 - All photography courtesy of Ella Dror PR

Layering was an important detail across the whole collection. The dresses and skirts were flowing, with knitted bralets, metallic leggings and tights worn underneath. There was also a mix of body-con wrap pieces, worn over designs such as a flowing lace-hole knitted maxi skirt, or tank top dress, and super wearable raglan-sleeved tops with elasticated vests which would add a perfect metallic shimmer for day or night. The Swarovski crystal embellishments added texture, and luxuriance. The draped designs left the body effortlessly, as the narrator explained how the pieces were knitted without elastic to create a looser, relaxed fit.

Craig Lawrence S/S 2012 - All photography courtesy of Ella Dror PR

One of the best things about a salon show is the chance to gain a greater understanding of the make up of the collection. For each of the 18 looks, a very well spoken narrator took the audience through the individual components, and explained the techniques undertaken. This replaced the usual upbeat modern song, and was a welcome point of difference. Through this, the salon show to me felt like a proper couture show, harking back to old fashion houses and buying appointments. There was a real sense of charm and nostalgia to this which I know is also an influence that Craig cites from his childhood in the countryside town of Ipswich.

Craig Lawrence S/S 2012

It was great – the audience was able to learn so much from the commentary. The narrator gave away details of craftsmanship that made you study Craig’s work as it came out one by one. We learnt that many of the pieces were created from a single thread to maintain the weightlessness. Indeed some of the designs looked like finely spun gold fisherman’s nets, and the models were beautiful sea creatures that had been caught in the webbing. The narration really helped to emphasise the level of work that had gone into creating this collection.

Craig Lawrence S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester

Craig Lawrence S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester

This was not the only aspect of the salon show that ensured it achieved a polished finish – the show was also styled by Dazed and Confused’s fashion editor Kate Shillingford, who has been a strong support of Craig’s career from the start, and oversees the creative direction of the label. Her expertise was really evident – no hanging yarn was out of place, the handmade shoes from Natacha Marro shoes fitted with the otherworldly air, and the delicate woven headpieces made by Steven Doherty were a superior finish acting as sparkling coral reefs, encased around the models heads.

I was mesmerized by Craig Lawrence’s embellished and shimmering sea-bed inspired offering. The pastel tones, metallic yarns and crystal details were subtle, serene and luxuriant. It was a fantastic collection that fully demonstrated his ability for producing knitwear that is challenging yet wearable, and significantly as a young designer, constantly pushing forward.

Categories ,british fashion council, ,Craig Lawrence, ,Crystals, ,Ella Dror PR, ,fashion, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Katie Shillingford, ,knitting, ,knitwear, ,lfw, ,Mark Fast, ,Martin Parr, ,Matt Bramford, ,Meagan Morrison, ,Megan Thomas, ,Metallic, ,Miranda Williams, ,Newgen, ,Phoebe Thirlwall, ,Presentation, ,S/S 2012, ,Salon Show, ,Somerset House, ,Swarovski, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Pam Hogg: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Catwalk Review

Pam Hogg A/W 2012 by Mitika Chohan
Pam Hogg A/W 2012 by Mitika Chohan.

We have sadly not been invited to a Pam Hogg show for two years now, and boy have I missed them: they are an incredibly hot ticket, so when I arrived late I was only able to secure a good position with the magic addition of a fold up chair. Only when I checked twitter later did I discover that the front row had been the usual celeb fest – I missed Nick Rhodes, Alexandra Burke, Janice Dickinson, Jo Wood and no doubt a host of others. Some of them can be found in this Fashion Scout blog post, as can I, in a lesson on how not to be caught on camera during LFW: looking like a giant warthog (I am HEAVILY PREGNANT) and desperately hoping to escape the photo. Note to self: if in doubt, smile.

Pam Hogg A/W 2012 by Faye West
Pam Hogg A/W 2012 by Faye West.

Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
The Pam Hogg A/W 2012 catwalk show WILD life began in stately fashion, with a sawing Appalachian violin to accompany the sedate steps of a model in towering ribboned heels. She wore a swinging latex dirndl skirt adorned with Hogg’s trademark geometric shapes in red, black, white and grey that were reminiscent of smaller knitted folk patterns, whilst a huge matching bonnet swallowed her head. Make-up was similarly bold: monobrows met sharply in the middle and accompanied Geisha-like dots above and beneath the eyes.

Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg A/W 2012 by Lo Parkin
Pam Hogg A/W 2012 by Lo Parkin.

Jaime Winstone was next to stride out with a bouncy swagger, stopping briefly for a languid barndancing turn with a fellow model in the middle of the catwalk. Then it was on to Pam Hogg‘s inimitable skintight catsuits – this time in an array of geometric, mesh and beribboned combinations.

Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
As more and more flesh was revealed the models retained a demure demeanour more befitting the previous wide skirts, even as they struggled to stay upright on crippling heels. Well, I say heels: what would have been heels were angled impossibly towards the platformed soles so that the girls appeared to balance on thin air.

Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg A/W 2012 by Veronica Rowlands
Pam Hogg A/W 2012 by Veronica Rowlands.

Red lace, silver lame, and furry merkins… it’s not a mixture I would ever have considered putting together myself, but Pam Hogg somehow combined incongruous materials to extravagant effect. Some of my favourite bodysuits featured carefully placed panels of rucking that puffed out sexily to emphasise womanly curves on buttocks and bosom.

Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Geometrics in copper, gold and silver created a futuristic effect as the music segued into something more modern, albeit with violins still at the forefront of the brilliant soundtrack – a testament to Pam’s love of music. Tight fitting dresses and culottes that swung just on the knee were beautifully sexy, especially in mesh with black arrow patterns – proving that these body hugging wonders suit more voluptuous creatures too.

Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
The show finished with a trio of stunning pieces: a sequinned full length dress in lilac, rose and gold, a dolly like mesh culotte dress with strategically placed lace cascading down the buttocks, and the denouement: a boudoir influenced outfit constructed entirely from red bows, complete with red ribbon garter. For the finale Pam Hogg – sporting cartoon bright yellow hair – was dragged down the catwalk by Jaime Winstone to whoops and hollers from the crowd.

Pam Hogg A/W 2012 by Faye West
Pam Hogg A/W 2012 by Faye West.

Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
No one can beat Pam Hogg when it comes to reinventing the catsuit – and this show proved that she can cut a mean skirt and bonnet too. In a 2009 interview she spoke honestly of the financial difficulty in creating such avante garde designs and her reliance on friends to sponsor her comeback fashion show: one wonders how she continues to survive, creating such uncommercial but fantastical outfits without which London Fashion Week would be a poorer place.

Pam Hogg A/W 2012 by Gilly Rochester
Pam Hogg A/W 2012 by Gilly Rochester.

Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
Pam Hogg AW 2012 -photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,A/W 2012, ,Alexandra Burke, ,Appalachian, ,Catsuits, ,Dirndl Skirts, ,Fashion Scout, ,folk, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,geometric, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Jaime Winstone, ,Janice Dickinson, ,Jo Wood, ,Latex, ,lfw, ,Lo Parkin, ,London Fashion Week, ,Merkins, ,Mesh, ,metallics, ,Mitika Chohan, ,Nick Rhodes, ,Pam Hogg, ,Ribbons, ,Veronica Rowlands, ,WILD life

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Amelia’s Magazine | Prophetik: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Catwalk Review


Prophetik A/W 2012 by Faye West

My fashion week hadn’t got off to the best of starts this season. I skipped day one, and arrived on day two rather worse for wear. I’d been out boozing the night before and hadn’t predicted to feel quite so dreadful the next morning. I managed the Spijkers show, but on my way to see my faces, Teatum Jones, I was spinning out so badly that I just had to return home. Spending the day on the sofa sorted me out, and so I leapt out of bed on a bright, Spring-like morning on Sunday (day three) to catch Prophetik, back after a hiatus last season, to see what Jeff Gardner could offer fashion fans at 10.30am.


Prophetik A/W 2012 by Claire Kearns

Seating was easy peasy thanks to the glorious gals at Forward PR, and the show began only a few minutes late. This season, Jeff’s charity of choice is the Lawrence Anthony Foundation, committed to protecting endangered rhinos. Well, I certainly didn’t expect to see photographs of rhinos mutilated at such an early hour, but the provocative images hit home the crisis the species face. It costs £30,000 to protect one rhino for a year – a terrifying amount of money – because the only way to keep them alive is by guarding them 24 hours a day. You can read more about the cause here.


All photography by Matt Bramford

So it was on with the show. True to form, a vibrant violinist opened the proceedings, galavanting up and down the catwalk as she played. A live band then accompanied music that blasted from the sound system and the first model appeared.

This collection was called ‘Courtly Love‘, which for a brief moment made me imagine Prophetik‘s staple frocks with Courtney Love-esque make-up. Alas, this wasn’t the case. The theme was more of a reference to Princess Grace, archetypal dandies and an age-old way of dressing reinvented with a surge of modernity. The collection brought Prophetik‘s inimitable style back to the catwalk – romance, drama and sophistication neatly packaged into one collection.


Prophetik A/W 2012 by Gilly Rochester

Layers of lace were built up on dresses, blouson sleeves met with tight cuffs, swooping necklines were decorated with ruffled trims and sashes around waists provided flattering silhouettes.

This season saw a shorter hemline on some pieces that came as a bit of a surprise; I’m used to Jeff’s floor-sweeping numbers but cuter frocks cut above the knee made the collection seem more wearable and playful.

Menswear was exemplary as per: this season brought cropped tuxedos with jazzy gold buttons and baggy knits; pillow-shaped sleeves appeared on shirts. I spent more time than was necessary fancying two frock coats, the first with beautiful embroidery that looked like a V&A exhibit, the second made from luxurious velvet with heavy brocade detailing.

I don’t see myself hanging around Bethnal Green in either, but I’ve since fantasised about wearing the latter around the house, pretending I’m from another era.


Prophetik A/W 2012 by Gabriel Ayala

The finale created gasps across the room: a dress, black on bottom, white on top, featured one of Jeff’s grandmother’s original blankets (he must be running out) covered in black feathers – a real red carpet number if ever I saw one; one that will likely have Livia Firth on the phone faster than you can say green carpet. Gasps of another kind came when Whitney Houston’s ‘I Wanna Dance With Somebody’ emerged from the speakers – an unorthadox choice at a Prophetik show, but one that had guests bouncing up and down in their seats.


Finale at Prophetik A/W 2012 by Faye West

While Prophetik isn’t my favourite type of fashion – I prefer the more contemporary, print-based designers – I’m never disappointed, as I’m sure the hopeless romantics won’t be either.

Categories ,A/W 2012, ,AW12, ,catwalk, ,Claire Kearns, ,Courtly Love, ,Dandy, ,fashion, ,Faye West, ,Forward PR, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Gabriel Ayala, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Jeff Garner, ,Lawrence, ,London Fashion Week, ,Matt Bramford, ,menswear, ,Prophetik, ,review, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Whitney Houston, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Inbar Spector

Inbar Spector SS12 by Gilly Rochester
Inbar Spector S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester.

I was entirely new to Inbar Spector this London Fashion Week, advice having heard of the Israeli born designer from devotee Gabby Young just a day before the show. Gabby frequently wears Inbar Spector on stage and was of course in attendance on the front row.

Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 by Jane Young
Inbar Spector S/S 2012 by Jane Young.

The fabulously named Inbar Spector has become well known for complex constructions and rich fabrics, and this seasons collection was no different. It featured a strong gothic 80s feel in favoured materials such as zips, chains, lace and faux leather (in line with her strict vegetarian beliefs). For her S/S 2012 collection Inbar Spector was inspired by a great fire which destroyed the majority of her home town in Israel: visions of violence, fire and terrifying medical situations were all fed into the mix. She writes on the press release about the anticipation and excitement that is tinged with fear when Israelis go to any big public event or party in Israel. Hence a certain spikiness in the styling.

Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory

The show opened with a lacy garment over which was worn a loose patchwork metallic embossed jacket. Models were styled with scary haystack hair, a line of grips stacking up behind their ears. It was certainly a break with current hair styling trends.

Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW Inbar Spector S/S 2012 by Celine Choo
Inbar Spector S/S 2012 by Celine Choo.

Severe catwalk lighting meant that models gained a beautiful backlit halo as they neared the photographers’ pit, with every contour highlighted. Luckily the models also stopped right in front of me to allow the audience a closer look at the garments. An oversized silvery coat was my favourite of the outerwear but the faux leather worked just as well in a short golden dress. Delicate materials wrapped around the body in tangled layers, melding with the metallics.

Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory

Then out strode a model wearing the most breath-taking bubble dress made out of gossamer light material as if to resemble a wonky christmas fold out paper decoration. Another shorter tutu style dress in palest peach was paired with gold leather and yet another version entirely encased the body in intricate folds. I have no idea how Inbar Spector achieved these looks but they were quite staggering. The final two dresses were even more spectacular – the first in heaped tiers of frothy cream that wrapped around the model’s neck. The second showstopper would have been fit to dress a fairy atop the christmas tree – a vast concertina-ed dress made entirely in laser cut gold fabric. Astonishing and very unique.

Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Inbar Spector S/S 2012. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Inbar Spector SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory gabby young
The beautiful Gabby Young.

Categories ,80s, ,Celine Choo, ,Fashion Scout, ,Faux Leather, ,gabby young, ,Gilly Rochester, ,gothic, ,Inbar Spector, ,Israel, ,Jane Young, ,lace, ,leather, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,London Kills Me, ,review, ,S/S 2012, ,Task PR, ,vegetarian, ,Violence

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Jayne Pierson (featuring Pierson Lawlor)


Jayne Pierson S/S 2012, order illustrated by Gareth A Hopkins

Oof, visit this site I love a new fashion week site. I took a Boris from the action at Somerset House all the way to Old Street to see Jayne Pierson‘s show at the LSO St Luke’s venue. This historic Anglican church is almost three hundred years old, buy information pills and was rescued by the LSO when controversial plans to turn the beauty into offices were proposed. Thank heavens.


Jayne Pierson S/S 2012, illustrated by Tina Reidy

The church is set in a beautiful garden, and as I sweated my way through it, I thought what a romantic setting for a fashion show. These are thoughts I only have when suffering from sleep deprivation and RFSI (Repetitive Fashion Show Injury). Inside, some of the former glory has gone to make way for inevitable modernisations, but the imposing ceiling and cold stone walls still exist. A catwalk had been temporarily constructed where the aisle would once have been, and a film played on loop at the end of a photography shoot starring a rather dishy ballet dancer. It was all very exciting.


Photography by Amelia Gregory

The show eventually started after the mandatory bunfight for seats and flashbulb shower for Pandemonia. A man whose name I didn’t have a chance to write down explained that, this season, Jayne Pierson had worked with the ballet and we were in for a treat. The models were to be ballet dancers. I almost audibly ‘whooped’ at how refreshing it all was.


Jayne Pierson S/S 2012, illustrated by Gabriel Ayala

Models appeared cheekily from behind a partition, moving gracefully down the catwalk en pointe. I know this is one of life’s wonders and people train for years to get this right, but it doesn’t half make me cringe (perhaps that’s Black Swan‘s influence, too). I imagine the agony you put your body through to achieve such a graceful poise.


Photography by Matt Bramford

A mixture of male and female models appeared, wearing Jayne Piersons S/S 2012 collection. This was clearly a collection influenced by dance and drama of all kind. They floated past, some faster than others, some acting a little like they might have been drinking, but nonetheless looking equally as beautiful. The theatrics, as splendid as they were, did distract a little from the clothes, and it’s only since I’ve reviewed my pictures that I’ve got a real flavour for what Jayne Pierson has produced this season.


Jayne Pierson S/S 2012, illustrated by Gilly Rochester

Jayne Pierson‘s now statement shapes flooded the catwalk; exaggerated shoulders, tight waists. Corsets in high-gloss leather were playfully applied to looser garments in similar colours. Micro shorts were leather. A muted graphic print was used on a dangerous bikini and a halterneck onesie. Modest pastel vests had been sexed up with black pom-pom like shoulder details. A bodycon dress carried theatrical orange fringing; sophistication, glamour and exquisite craftsmanship evident in every piece.


Jayne Pierson S/S 2012, illustrated by Gareth A Hopkins

Jayne Pierson‘s clever use of material and colour was as evident as it has been during her five fashion week outings. Leathers, suedes and silks all flow organically throughout this cohesive collection, helped along by a colour palette of stone, taupe, grey, champagne and sand.


Photography by Amelia Gregory

I’m not sure if it was the Royal Ballet dancing element having an influence, but the clothes were very dramatic, and I did wonder what they might look like modelled in the usual fashion. But a finale that brought the dancers pairing up to perform some dramatic lifts really raised eyebrows and audible gasps echoed around St Luke’s. Sitting across from me, it was clear Caryn Franklin loved it. And I did too.


Photography by Matt Bramford

Categories ,Amelia, ,ballet, ,Black Swan, ,Caryn Franklin, ,catwalk, ,dance, ,Derek Lawlor, ,drama, ,En Pointe, ,Front Row, ,Gabriel Ayala, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Jayne Pierson, ,leather, ,LSO St Luke’s, ,Matt Bramford, ,Onesie, ,Pandemonia, ,review, ,RFSI, ,Royal Ballet, ,S/S 2012, ,Suede, ,Tina Reidy, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Paul Costelloe

Paul Costello 3_by Gilly Rochester LFW SS 2012
Paul Costelloe S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester

Butterflies doing cartwheels in my tummy and the feeling that my consciousness has surreptitiously tiptoed away, adiposity wanting to take in everything… right now; it can only be the start of London Fashion Week.

Paul Costelloe  by Amber Cassidy, <a target=order London Fashion Week, mind SS 2012″ title=”Paul Costelloe by Amber Cassidy, London Fashion Week, SS 2012″ width=”480″ height=”680″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-49295″ />
Paul Costelloe S/S 2012 by Amber Cassidy

Paul Costelloe SS 2012 review London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory
Paul Costello SS 2012 London Fashion Week Akeela Bhattay
Paul Costello London Fashion Week SS 2012 Akeela Bhattay
All photography by Amelia Gregory, Akeela Bhattay and Matt Bramford

It’s the first show of the day and there’s a rush of excitement bustling through Somerset House. I wait impatiently in the queue for the Paul Costelloe show, surrounded by familiar press talk and the occasional exclamation of ‘Darling!‘ kiss kiss – a scene which will be re-enacted many times during the this week.

Paul Costelloe SS 2012 review London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory
LFW London Fashion Week SS2012 PaulCostelloe by Matt Bramford
LFW London Fashion Week SS2012 PaulCostelloe by Matt Bramford
Paul costello Joana Faria SS 12 London Fashion Week
Paul Costelloe S/S 2012 Joana Faria

Once inside, I find my seat at the front, secure my goody bag, retrieve my camera from my exhausted looking satchel and decide that taking notes and photographs at the same time is not achievable (for me, that is), so do away with my notebook. There’s a flurry of photographers suddenly surrounding guests further down the row and I want to see what all the fuss is about; It’s Jimmy Choo and Autumn Philips. A quick ‘snap snap’ with my decrepit camera and back to my seat before the show starts.

Jimmy Choo at Paul Costelloe SS 2012 London Fashion Week Akeela Bhattay
Paul Costelloe SS 2011 review-Autumn Philips
Jimmy Choo and Autumn Philips.

Paul Costelloe SS 2012 review London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory
LFW London Fashion Week SS2012 PaulCostelloe by Matt Bramford
LFW London Fashion Week SS2012 PaulCostelloe by Matt Bramford
Paul Costello 2_by Gilly Rochester LFW SS 2012
Paul Costelloe S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester

Out glides the first model, her hair in large messy but firm pin curls and knots pinned close to the head with eye-make up in pea green (one of my favourite colours) that jumps out at you. She wears a tailored suit in café au lait, with the jacket in a 1940’s inspired style; slightly puffed sleeves, tapered collar and a slim belt accentuating the waist. The skirt however conforms more to the style of the mini-skirt and with loose pleats the outfit looks effortlessly chic.

Paul Costelloe SS 2012 review London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory
Paul Costello London Fashion Week SS 2012 Akeela Bhattay
Paul Costello SS 2012 London Fashion Week Akeela Bhattay
Paul Costello SS 2012 London Fashion Week Akeela Bhattay
Paul Costelloe SS 2012 review London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory
Paul Costelloe  by Amber Cassidy SS 2012 London Fashion Week
Paul Costelloe S/S 2012 by Amber Cassidy

Hues of cream, grey and monochrome forge ahead; structured suits with pleated detail and baby doll dresses with flouncy sleeves and cap sleeves, high collars and ruff collars, and high waists, distinctive of the 1960s mod fashion. The 60’s influence continues through most of the collection, with sailor collars, high waists and short hemlines. Billowing sleeves meanwhile, and wide neck collars hint of the medieval.

LFW London Fashion Week SS2012 PaulCostelloe by Matt Bramford
LFW London Fashion Week SS2012 PaulCostelloe by Matt Bramford
Paul costello Joana Faria SS 2012 London Fashion Week
Paul Costelloe S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

The muted colours bloom into a concoction of pastels that remind me of a box of Parisian macaroons, in candy floss pink, bittersweet peach and mint ice-cream green. The rich brocade fabrics in these delectable colours ooze femininity and an inhibited playfulness, a characteristic synonymous with the 1960’s. The tailored jackets and shift dresses , evocative of Jackie Kennedy and Mad Men, too celebrate femininity.

Paul Costello SS 2012 London Fashion Week Akeela Bhattay
LFW London Fashion Week SS2012 Paul Costelloe by Matt Bramford
Paul Costello 1 by Gilly Rochester LFW SS 2012
Paul Costelloe S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester

LFW London Fashion Week SS2012 Paul Costelloe by Matt Bramford

The menswear collection harks to an era much further away with, Edwardian austerity pleasantly combined with the coquettishness of the New Romantics and a becoming bow to the seventies. Like the womenswear, the tailoring is excellent but never restrictive and is softened by rhythmic pleats, ruffles and capacious gauze and linen shirts. The colours adhere the relaxed and almost playful demeanour of the collection, from soft neautrals and intense indigo to colours of candy.

Paul Costelloe SS 2012 review London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

I especially love the way each outfit moves, simply and fluently and functionally! The pleats which seem to feature in many of the outfits are mesmerising to watch and sit beautifully on each piece. Paul Costelloe asserts his view on sandals and socks; a resounding yes to sandals with socks.

Paul Costelloe SS 2012 review London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory
Paul Costello SS 2012 London Fashion Week Akeela Bhattay
Paul Costelloe set out to produce a collection that combines the signature Costelloe style together with elements of vintage Parisian chic – I do believe he has succeeded.

Paul Costello SS 2012 London Fashion Week Akeela Bhattay

If the consistent creativity and quality of Paul Costelloe’s collections are signs of things to come, I cannot wait to see his take on Autumn Winter 2012.


Play the video and watch the show.

Categories ,1940s, ,1960s, ,1970s, ,Akeela Bhattay, ,Amber Cassidy, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Amelia’s Magazine, ,Autumn Philips, ,Baby Doll dress, ,british fashion council, ,Brocade, ,Chase PR, ,Coral, ,designer, ,Edwardian, ,Feminine, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Hilary Alexander, ,Jackie Kennedy, ,Jimmy Choo, ,Joana Faria, ,LFW TV, ,Live Show, ,London Fashion Week, ,Mad Men, ,Matt Bramford, ,medieval, ,menswear, ,Mint, ,Mod, ,Parisian, ,Paul Costelloe, ,pink, ,S/S 2012, ,Shift Dress, ,Somerset House, ,spring, ,summer, ,Swing Coat, ,video, ,vintage, ,Watch Online, ,Womanswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Spijkers en Spijkers

Spijkers en Spijkers S/S 2012 by Emmi Ojala

Spijkers en Spijkers S/S 2012 by Emmi Ojala

I’d found myself in unfamiliar surroundings for this show, drug over in West London at the Show Space on Grosvenor Place. The queue outside had been pleasantly short, and I was ushered smoothly into the building, with none of the usual cattle herding behaviour experienced at other London Fashion Week shows. The room was grand, with decorative white walls and high ceilings. I read from the press release that the inspiration was the Middle Eastern tale One Thousand and One Nights – a story about a young girl who uses her wits to enchant and win over a King. I wasn’t overly familiar with the Spijkers sister’s work, but had previously read Sally Mumby-Croft’s review of the sisters’ S/S 2011 collection, and was excited at the prospect of some opulent Persian splendour on a Saturday afternoon.

Spijkers en Spijkers photo by Tim Adey
Photography by Tim Adey.

The show was running late, by about 10 minutes, and I got chatting to the girl next to me, an illustrator from Access Fashion, about the rush to get over here from Somerset House from the Ashish show. This down time was ruined by a chirpy PR girl, who perhaps could sense I was slightly hungover, and playing on this vulnerable state, kept asking me and my new illustrator friend to shuffle up and down on the very wobbly bench. She tried joking and laughing, but on the 4th move, with no new people to be seated, it wasn’t amusing anymore, and I scared her off with a look, and a fierce rattle of the bag of popcorn I’d found in my goody bag.

Spijkers en Spijkers S/S 2012 by Miranda Williams
Spijkers en Spijkers S/S 2012 by Miranda Williams
All photography by Miranda Williams

The lights finally dimmed, and I was surprised. The first look was an ivory and black star panelled dress with a fringed hem. It was completed with a wide head scarf, which also had the heavy black fringe. This look emanted the style of early 1930′s flappers, not a Persian Queen as I had expected. Nevermind I thought, as the next look pleased – a tapered leg pantsuit with an oversized silk satin blazer, again in ivory and black, which had a sort of Katherine Hepburn feel to it.

Spijkers En Spijkers S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester
Spijkers en Spijkers S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester

As the looks continued, I understood that the collection was deeply dress focussed, and alot of the intricately panelled dresses looked like sophisticated underwear to me. With an added tease, cheeky hemlines were split right up to the top of the thigh, and the silk twill and satins of the bias cut dresses clung neatly to the models bodies. This was definitely more F. Scott Fitzgerald, but it didn’t matter, I was enchanted by the glamorous flapper girls walking before me. The models were also completely gorgeous – and the romantic styling helped. Their hair was tousled, and they were made up with a slick of lime green eye shadow, glossy bronze cheeks and neutral lips. Perfect.

Spijkers en Spijkers S/S 2012 by Miranda Williams
Spijkers en Spijkers S/S 2012 by Miranda Williams

One of the first looks that I really liked was a beautiful deep cut satin dress, in cream and ivory. It was made up from diamond shaped panels, and didn’t cling to the body, but held against it, showing chest, but just the right amount. This was also featured with one of the heavily tasselled headscarves, which became a real addition to each outfit. Creatively draped around the models head’s, I did understand some reference to the exotic Middle East with these accessories. Pop colours were also brought in as the palette developed on from the base of black and ivory, with the addition of coral and lime green.

Spijkers en Spijkers photo by Tim Adey

Star panels emblazoned the front and sides of most of the looks, in neutral creams and ivories, but also in black and silver. I much preferred this detail when the star panels were in the muted colours, across some of the simpler silk dresses. As I felt there was a sort of costume effect in some of the looks that had the bright silver stars splashed across the chest. The metal chains on the back of the dresses were a clever and fine detail, acting as both the construction and decoration of each. This reminded me of the costumes of exotic dancers, with gold chains wound around their bodies and limbs, attached to their clothes, and doubling as ornamentation.

Spijkers en Spijkers photo by Tim Adey

Vibrant colours filtered through towards the end of the run – pink, and also a colour that seems to be very on trend for S/S 2012, purple. One of the signature looks was a purple silk satin dress, with thin straps, lime green panels and a pink star on the right side of the chest. Worlds apart from my usual choice of black, and more black, I thought it was simple, super pretty, but importantly, fun. Another detail that the Spijkers sisters used in excess, and which has appeared across other catwalks this year was tassels. They were heavy and stitched onto to the bottom of hems. They added great movement to the dresses, with the addition of one or two splits running up the front legs of dresses, helping the fringing to sway with every pace.

Spijkers en Spijkers S/S 2012 by Miranda Williams

What I felt really worked in the collection were the loose fitting jumpsuits with crinkle silk satin blazers, and simple cut dresses with fewer panels. These were classic shapes that were sleek and sophisticated. I wasn’t so keen on the last couple of looks – which introduced brown linen, in a blazer jacket and a pair of ¾ length trousers. It felt out of place in the collection – was it a last minute addition for another fabric or element? Bit of an odd choice I thought. However, the shoes were great – high platforms with black or metallic star panels that screamed 1970′s glamour!

Although the show had lacked the richness of the Persian fairy tale I had read about, it certainly brought a taste of the compelling and hedonistic 1930’s. Since the labels conception in 2000, the sisters have become known for their use of graphic prints and colours, and they certainly delivered on that level. They have not strayed from their ‘signature’ style – which worked in its own charming way. Truus and Riet Spijkers showed a S/S 2012 collection that was feminine and fluid, wearable and well designed pieces, which looked as beautiful from the back as it did from the front.

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Categories ,1930s, ,1970s, ,Emmi Ojala, ,fashion, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Glamour, ,Grosvenor Place, ,Katherine Hepburn, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,London Fashion Week S/S 2012, ,One Thousand and One Nights, ,Persian, ,Persian Queen, ,Popcorn, ,S/S 2012, ,Sally Mumby-Croft, ,Show Space, ,Somerset House, ,Spijkers en Spijkers, ,The Show Space

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Toni & Guy – Hair Meets Wardrobe


Naomi Campbell, salve illustrated by Phoebe Kirk

So fashion week (unofficially) kicked off early this S/S 2012 season with a Thursday night show-cum-product launch from purveyors of the faukhawk, Toni & Guy. I had no idea what to expect from this. Well, clearly I imagined there’d be a fair few hair dos on display – but would it take the form of a normal runway show? What would the fashion be like? Would I leave desperate to dash to my nearest T&G salon? I was soon to find out.


Toni & Guy, illustrated by Gareth A Hopkins

Inside the uninspiring BFC tent within the awe-inspiring Somerset House, we were treated to champagne, Pimm’s and traumatic canapés that make it entirely impossible to look attractive whilst throwing them in your gob. I was starving though, so I did my best ‘I-don’t-even-care-about-looking-attractive’ face whilst hoovering them up. Inside the tent we were rewarded with pretty decent seats, an enormous goodie bag featuring the new Toni & Guy Hair Meets Wardrobe range, and a crisp A4 sheet detailing what was about to happen. I scanned down it and thought I read ‘with an introduction by Naomi Campbell’. I read through it again. I hadn’t been mistaken; ‘with an introduction by NAOMI CAMPBELL‘. There it was, in black and white. Really? The Naomi Campbell? Yikes.


Naomi Campbell, illustrated by Sally Jane Thompson

A scrum ensued when Olivia Palermo took her Frow seat right in front of us: flash after flash left a permanent glare on my eyeballs. She was joined by Matthew Williamson in a rather stylish hat, with yet more flashbulbs going off at record speed.


Olivia Palermo, illustrated by The Lovely Wars

The lights dimmed and an X-Factor-style voiceover requested we welcome NAOMI CAMPBELL. Not much of an ask, let’s face it. Out she sashayed to huge cheers, and I could actually feel one of my legs wobbling. I write the next sentence with caution and hide behind my screen to avoid any airborne mobile phones, but our Naomi isn’t the best public speaker. I can’t imagine she’d spent much time rehearsing, but she fluffed her way through it, referring to Hair Meets Wardrobe as ‘Meet the Wardrobe’, at which I chuckled. Having said that, a woman like Naomi could read the Yellow Pages aloud and I’d still be completely mesmerised.


All photography by Matt Bramford

On with the show, and a video popped up on the big screen showing some of nature’s finest matches: fish ‘n’ chips, gin and tonic and so on – I think they were getting at that hair and wardrobe are quiet important together – a concept not brand new to fashion. The show was then divided into four sections (the four components of the new Toni & Guy brand): classic, casual, glamour and creative.

Classic


Illustration by Gilly Rochester

The classic section featured 1960s-esque natural beauties with slick hair styles. Croydon facelifts were popular – a hairstyle that will never go out of fashion.

Casual
I loved the ‘casual’ section, and can’t wait to mess up my locks with the sea salt spray we were given. Sexy bedroom hair, that I’ve since seen on numerous catwalks, was presented in a variety of ways, from backcombed scruffy heaps piled atop models’ heads, to long natural styles with uneven plaits.

Glamour


Illustration by Gilly Rochester

T&G cranked up the glamour for what was by far my favourite portion of the show. 1920s tight waves walked alongside big, big backcombed locks and modern interpretations of the pompadour. Sexy, smokey eye make-up and flowing frocks brought the looks together perfectly.

Creative

Illustration by Gareth A Hopkins

This is praps what Toni&Guy are essentially known for – and I have to admit that I was expecting much more of this from the show. Y’know – the kind of hairstyle popular with Diesel-clad punters from Leeds. A couple of spiked coloured numbers felt a bit dated in the mix of all that glamour and sophistication, but a Louise Brooks-esque severe bob soon turned things around. A few cartoonish styles at the end brought a welcomed bit of fun.

Previous fashion editor of Tatler, Charlie Anderson, had styled the show and had married striking outfits with each of the hairstyles. it’s difficult to focus on hair alone when you’re used to watching models parade backwards and forwards, but the clothes (apart from the final pieces) were cool enough to bring the barnets to life without stealing the show. These were my final thoughts as another pap scrum formed where Naomi had taken her seat.

All photography by Matt Bramford

Categories ,BFC, ,Casual, ,Charlie Anderson, ,Classic, ,Creative, ,fashion, ,Fauxhawk, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Glamour, ,Hair, ,Hair Meets Wardrobe, ,London Fashion Week, ,Louise Brooks, ,Naomi Campbell, ,Phoebe Kirk, ,Pimm’s, ,S/S 2012, ,Sally Jane Thompson, ,Somerset House, ,The X Factor Voice Over Man, ,Toni & Guy

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Toni & Guy – Hair Meets Wardrobe


Naomi Campbell, salve illustrated by Phoebe Kirk

So fashion week (unofficially) kicked off early this S/S 2012 season with a Thursday night show-cum-product launch from purveyors of the faukhawk, Toni & Guy. I had no idea what to expect from this. Well, clearly I imagined there’d be a fair few hair dos on display – but would it take the form of a normal runway show? What would the fashion be like? Would I leave desperate to dash to my nearest T&G salon? I was soon to find out.


Toni & Guy, illustrated by Gareth A Hopkins

Inside the uninspiring BFC tent within the awe-inspiring Somerset House, we were treated to champagne, Pimm’s and traumatic canapés that make it entirely impossible to look attractive whilst throwing them in your gob. I was starving though, so I did my best ‘I-don’t-even-care-about-looking-attractive’ face whilst hoovering them up. Inside the tent we were rewarded with pretty decent seats, an enormous goodie bag featuring the new Toni & Guy Hair Meets Wardrobe range, and a crisp A4 sheet detailing what was about to happen. I scanned down it and thought I read ‘with an introduction by Naomi Campbell’. I read through it again. I hadn’t been mistaken; ‘with an introduction by NAOMI CAMPBELL‘. There it was, in black and white. Really? The Naomi Campbell? Yikes.


Naomi Campbell, illustrated by Sally Jane Thompson

A scrum ensued when Olivia Palermo took her Frow seat right in front of us: flash after flash left a permanent glare on my eyeballs. She was joined by Matthew Williamson in a rather stylish hat, with yet more flashbulbs going off at record speed.


Olivia Palermo, illustrated by The Lovely Wars

The lights dimmed and an X-Factor-style voiceover requested we welcome NAOMI CAMPBELL. Not much of an ask, let’s face it. Out she sashayed to huge cheers, and I could actually feel one of my legs wobbling. I write the next sentence with caution and hide behind my screen to avoid any airborne mobile phones, but our Naomi isn’t the best public speaker. I can’t imagine she’d spent much time rehearsing, but she fluffed her way through it, referring to Hair Meets Wardrobe as ‘Meet the Wardrobe’, at which I chuckled. Having said that, a woman like Naomi could read the Yellow Pages aloud and I’d still be completely mesmerised.


All photography by Matt Bramford

On with the show, and a video popped up on the big screen showing some of nature’s finest matches: fish ‘n’ chips, gin and tonic and so on – I think they were getting at that hair and wardrobe are quiet important together – a concept not brand new to fashion. The show was then divided into four sections (the four components of the new Toni & Guy brand): classic, casual, glamour and creative.

Classic


Illustration by Gilly Rochester

The classic section featured 1960s-esque natural beauties with slick hair styles. Croydon facelifts were popular – a hairstyle that will never go out of fashion.

Casual
I loved the ‘casual’ section, and can’t wait to mess up my locks with the sea salt spray we were given. Sexy bedroom hair, that I’ve since seen on numerous catwalks, was presented in a variety of ways, from backcombed scruffy heaps piled atop models’ heads, to long natural styles with uneven plaits.

Glamour


Illustration by Gilly Rochester

T&G cranked up the glamour for what was by far my favourite portion of the show. 1920s tight waves walked alongside big, big backcombed locks and modern interpretations of the pompadour. Sexy, smokey eye make-up and flowing frocks brought the looks together perfectly.

Creative

Illustration by Gareth A Hopkins

This is praps what Toni&Guy are essentially known for – and I have to admit that I was expecting much more of this from the show. Y’know – the kind of hairstyle popular with Diesel-clad punters from Leeds. A couple of spiked coloured numbers felt a bit dated in the mix of all that glamour and sophistication, but a Louise Brooks-esque severe bob soon turned things around. A few cartoonish styles at the end brought a welcomed bit of fun.

Previous fashion editor of Tatler, Charlie Anderson, had styled the show and had married striking outfits with each of the hairstyles. it’s difficult to focus on hair alone when you’re used to watching models parade backwards and forwards, but the clothes (apart from the final pieces) were cool enough to bring the barnets to life without stealing the show. These were my final thoughts as another pap scrum formed where Naomi had taken her seat.

All photography by Matt Bramford

Categories ,BFC, ,Casual, ,Charlie Anderson, ,Classic, ,Creative, ,fashion, ,Fauxhawk, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Glamour, ,Hair, ,Hair Meets Wardrobe, ,London Fashion Week, ,Louise Brooks, ,Naomi Campbell, ,Phoebe Kirk, ,Pimm’s, ,S/S 2012, ,Sally Jane Thompson, ,Somerset House, ,The X Factor Voice Over Man, ,Toni & Guy

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