Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Blow Presents Fanny and Jessy

Fanny and Jessy S/S 2012 by Diela Maharanie
Fanny and Jessy S/S 2012 by Diela Maharanie.

Fanny and Jessy have a great name that suits their cute, diagnosis fun clothing, ambulance worn by such luminaries as Lady Gaga, buy information pills Jessie J and Saint Saviour. The design duo hail from Somerset and graduated from the London College of Fashion in 2009 since when they have worked with designers such as PPQ and Jean Charles de Castelbajac before deciding to launch their own collection.

Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy S/S 2012 by Ellie Sutton
Fanny and Jessy S/S 2012 by Ellie Sutton.

The Fanny and Jessy S/S 2012 collection featured a strong cowboy influenced aesthetic, translated into a simple colour palette of cream, tomato red, beige and sea green. Pleated wide leg trousers and pencil skirts were worn beneath fringed jackets, with the occasional fringed face covering making an intriguing appearance. Flaps were a central theme throughout, appearing as bibs on tops and as exaggerated detailing on waists. A backless top followed one of the key trends this season, and delightful red suede platforms were worn with large gauge knitted ankle socks. A loose oversized backpack provided a nicely utilitarian feel.

Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
fanny and jessy S/S 2012 by Lisa Stannard
Fanny and Jessy S/S 2012 by Lisa Stannard.

Two wonderfully delicate print designs by illustrator Lynnie Zulu were used throughout the collection. On a matching trouser suit the symmetrical print, which looked like tribal faces, was featured across the shoulder flap and pocket detailing of a cowboy shirt. A swirling feathered design was repeated on shorts, a shirt dress and a flapping waxed fabric kagoule. I recommend you take a peek at Lynnie Zulu‘s website as it features some fabulous stuff.

Fanny and Jessy S/S 2012 by Rachel Higham
Fanny and Jessy S/S 2012 by Rachel Higham.

Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Fanny and Jessy S/S 2012. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

This was a wonderfully original yet wearable collection from a pair of designers to watch. Keep your eyes on Fanny and Jessy.

Categories ,Blow PR, ,Blow Presents, ,Cowboy, ,Diela Maharanie, ,Ellie Sutton, ,Fanny and Jessy, ,Fringing, ,Jean-Charles de Castelbajac, ,Jessie J, ,Lady Gaga, ,Lisa Stannard, ,London College of Fashion, ,LSO St Luke’s, ,Lynnie Zulu, ,ppq, ,print, ,Rachel Higham, ,Saint Saviour, ,somerset, ,The Kings Collection

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Blow Presents Jane Bowler

Jane Bowler S/S 2012 by Ellie Sutton
Jane Bowler S/S 2012 by Ellie Sutton.

Jane Bowler is a graduate of the Royal College of Art who works in innovative ways with inexpensive and mundane materials, store and she was the first designer to show at the Blow Presents showcase at London Fashion Week. For her S/S 2012 collection she worked in collaboration with knitwear designers Heather Orr, what is ed Victoria Campbell and Victoria Bulmer to create a stunning group of garments inspired by the story of Icarus. Using plastic and latex with soft block-coloured knitted tops and laddered leggings beneath, sale the collection was fearless and fun.

Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler S/S 2012 by Scarlett Tierney
Jane Bowler S/S 2012 by Scarlett Tierney.

Clothing featured fabulous swishing tassels, curled feather like patterns and tufts of feathers in translucent rainbow hues. Sunglasses came with cute coloured eyebrows attached like question marks, a collaboration with Studio Swine. Tight swimming cap hats and high t-bar platforms were also accessorised with rampant plastic additions, and as the show reached a crescendo we were treated to the most fully feathered piece of all: a huge cape worn by a delightfully curvaceous model.

Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane-bowler-SS12-by-Lisa-Stannard
Jane Bowler S/S 2012 by Lisa Stannard.

I loved the unabashed boldness of this thoroughly unique collection, which amongst the more fantastical elements featured some highly wearable pieces. I look forward to seeing what Jane Bowler does next.

Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jane Bowler S/S 2012 review. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

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Categories ,Blow PR, ,Blow Presents, ,Ellie Sutton, ,Feathers, ,Heather Orr, ,Icarus, ,Jane Bowler, ,knitwear, ,Latex, ,Lisa Stannard, ,LSO St Luke’s, ,Plastic, ,platforms, ,rainbow, ,Royal College of Art, ,Scarlett Tierney, ,Studio Swine, ,Sunglasses, ,Tassels, ,Translucent, ,Victoria Bulmer, ,Victoria Campbell

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Dans La Vie

Dans La Vie by Marta Spendowska
Dans La Vie S/S 2012 by Marta Spendowska.

On Sunday I attended my first ever Dans La Vie show with very little idea of what to expect, price but hey, viagra 100mg the invitation was a colourful mashup of imagery and in my book that’s generally a good sign. Dans La Vie is diminutive Japanese designer Rira Sugawara and began life in 1999 as a print collection, clearly her first love. Since 2005 she has been presenting a full clothing collection in Paris, Milan and Berlin – now it’s our turn in London.

Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie (SS 2012) by Barb Royal
Dans La Vie S/S 2012 by Barb Royal.

This seasons collection was titled My Pop Madonna (Clash Beauty), and her four signature print designs were inspired and sent down the catwalk to music by four iconic female musicians: Madonna (of course), Rihanna, Lady Gaga and the late lamented Amy Winehouse. According to the press release My Pop Madonna (Clash Beauty) was also a response to Rira Sugawara‘s feelings in the aftermath of the Japanese earthquake: it wasn’t exactly clear how these two seemingly unrelated strands of inspiration were intertwined, but the results were fun and refreshingly different.

Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW SS12 Dans La Vie by Kristina Vasiljeva
Dans La Vie S/S 2012 by Kristina Vasiljeva.

Rira Sugawara‘s Dan La Vie label specialises in a kind of glossy collaged look, which was manifested in the very first outfit to hit the catwalk: it featured a striking all over matching print on the blouse and a matching full shiny skirt that looked fit for the wettest of days. The collaged design included all sorts of intriguing elements: a Madonna face and florals mashed up into a striped pattern reminiscent of shifting ground. A cute shorts and blouse ensemble was followed by a wide belted trench that seemed more befitting of the patent fabric and was one of my favourite elements of this collection.

Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
dans la vie ellie sutton
Dans La Vie S/S 2012 by Ellie Sutton.

A giant floral print entwined with floating cherubs featured on more separates and this was then followed by a powerful pink roses and hearts combo that spread to holdalls and clutch bags. The collection then switched towards the biggest collage design yet, featuring apples, daffodils and what looked like skyscrapers. This was accompanied by some unfortunate pastel lips and then for some inexplicable reason a model appeared with her tits poking out of an otherwise demure beige blouse. Aside from these strange styling decisions there were lots of fun elements to the My Pop Madonna collection, and many of the Dans La Vie separates could easily find a place in the wardrobe of someone with a bold and colourful aesthetic.

Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie S/S 2012. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,amy winehouse, ,Barb Royal, ,Blow PR, ,catwalk, ,Clash Beauty, ,Clutch Bags, ,collage, ,Dans La Vie, ,Earthquake, ,Ellie Sutton, ,Fashion Scout, ,florals, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Glossy, ,hearts, ,japanese, ,kitsch, ,Kristina Vasiljeva, ,Lady Gaga, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Madonna, ,Marta Spendowska, ,My Pop Madonna, ,print, ,review, ,Rihanna, ,Rira Sugawara, ,S/S 2012, ,Separates, ,Trench Coat

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Peter Jensen

Peter Jensen S/S 2012 by Ellie Sutton
Peter Jensen S/S 2012 by Ellie Sutton.

For this season Peter Jensen was inspired by the force of nature that was Nina Simone, thumb picking on the many facets of her legendary life for inspiration, prescription including her overwhelming devil-may-care attitude. Presented in the Portico Rooms to a backdrop of classical music played live on a grand piano by Maria Marchant, this was a confident collection from a man who is assured of his place in the pantheon of established fashion designers.

Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter-Jensen SS-2012 by-Barb-Royal
Peter Jensen SS-2012 by Barb Royal.

Against the kitsch decor of a gold potted palm tree and signature neon bunny Peter Jensen sent out his girls in rabbit eared shades from Fabris Lane and elegant headscarfs by Bernstock Speirs: broderie anglaise, pan collars, pencil skirts with peplums, big hoop earrings by Erickson Beamon and ankle socks with t-bars all alluded to Nina Simone‘s early days as a good church going Southern girl.

Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen S/S 2012 by Rebecca Strickson
Peter Jensen S/S 2012 by Rebecca Strickson.

Then from the 70s Peter Jensen brought us relaxed gold lame jerseywear teamed with swinging gold clasp handbags and bow decorated clutches. Sexy figure hugging scribble leopard print pants were teamed with lightweight gold cable knit jumpers. A colourful block print safari on a slim trench coat and crop-legged suit was inspired by the flickering TV static of constant attention on Nina Simone, from both audience and media.

Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory

A cheeky bi colour repeat parrot print gave a modern edge to a bare-shouldered peplum dress. Flounces running down the shoulders of a denim blue bib dress and frills just below the waist of a full gingham skirt were indicative of the cheeky feel that ran throughout this collection and was equally matched in the relaxed glamour stakes – pure Peter Jensen in other words.

Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Peter Jensen S/S 2012. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Peter Jensen SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Spotted in the audience, a man with the most amazing twirly beard.

Categories ,79s, ,Barb Royal, ,Bernstock Speirs, ,Bunnies, ,Clutch Bags, ,Ellie Sutton, ,Erickson Beamon, ,Fabris Lane, ,Frills, ,Gold, ,Leopard Print, ,lfw, ,live music, ,London Fashion Week, ,Maria Marchant, ,Nina, ,Nina Simone, ,Pan Collars, ,pencil skirt, ,Peter Jensen, ,piano, ,Portico Rooms, ,Rabbit, ,Rebecca Strickson, ,Safari, ,Somerset House, ,Village press

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Mary Katrantzou

thumb MFP
Maria_Francesca_Pepe_Abby_Wright_LFW

MariaFrancescaPepe LFW A/W 2011. Illustration by Abby Wright.

It was extremely dark in that first room. Save for a few lamps casting red strips of a blood-like glow. Certain points were lit up on the model, discount the shining metal spikes, the dull sheen of black leather and the pointed hat. I will be honest now. I had to check that the model was in fact a mannequin. She was. But checking was interesting. The light was so low and I was terrified she would move suddenly. An intimidating mannequin.

red

Hels MFP 5

Hels MFP 1

I wasn’t sure whether the rest of the models would be mannequins too, but as we entered slightly more light filled rooms, it was obvious that these ones were real. But they were also a higher level of scary. Two looked like mermaids trapped on rocks. Occasionally shifting, they looked confident, bored and yet super vulnerable and TRAPPED. I felt myself want to look at them closer, but then one of them looked me in the eye. Which was a shock. These models, with their purposefully lank, long hair, dark eyes, glossy and pale skin, ghostlike sheer dresses, and fabulous golden accessories looked like aliens. Of course ridiculously beautiful aliens.

Hels MFP 5

Hels MFP 5

Photography Helen Martin

I have to say that I was mesmerised by the back of one model. She had a golden, Egyptian styled headpiece, in the shape of eyes. The three main headpieces were forged by hand in resin and carbon steel, then varnished in opalescent acrylics and hand studded with brass and Swarovski hexagonal studs. They are designed in the style of medieval shields and helmets. The tiara for me was my favourite however, it looked regal and yet delicate and pretty. Also empowering, I imagine a useful attribute for whichever land she/you/me might be in. In contrast, although also empowering, MariaFrancescaPepe‘s shoes looked like something you could definitely cause GBH with. Not pretty, pretty – fierce! In a more sultry way than Rihanna fierce. With enormous spikes at the top, their cream colour, did little to belie their extra ridiculous height and metal danger.

Hels MFP 3

Hels MFP 3

Photography Helen Martin

Like the tiara, the majority of the presentation focused on eyes. Earrings, rings and chains…. EYES. This was a small issue for me. Ever since my brother told me the details of his eye operation at five years old, and then watching Dali’s eye slitting scene – ugh- I’m feeling sick as I write, I have been afraid of anything touching eyes. Or just weird eyes. And in truth… Dali. Cue sweeping generalisation alert: In terms of films, books, art and what I have seen; the 30s, like the 70s, seem like the scariest decades to me. Thus, when the saddest and scariest looking model of them all, looked at me right in the eye, with her incredibly, INTENSELY mesmerising own eyes, I didn’t know what to do. Transfixing model.

Hels MFP 5

Model looking at me… Photography Helen Martin

It’s not surprising that MariaFrancescaPepe has been heavily influenced by Dali’s surrealism for this collection. As I read: ‘Objects of magical meaning and of inner strength. A mask hides and reveals at the same time. Eyes are a mirror for the soul. Dali’s surrealism lesson has been learnt.’ The presentation was tribal and punky, but also ethereal and ghost-like. Almost like facing your own deep reality, that of the soul’s and our desires. The ‘ahhhhhhhhhhh’ music added to these fearful and reflective thoughts. It was as if MariaFrancescaPepe had gone through Indiana Jones’s chest of treasure, added in some Alien, X Files, lots of Dali and then Marilyn Manson on top. Sounds odd, is odd – but also very interesting. It comes as no surprise that Lady GaGa apparently ‘embodies’ MariaFrancescaPepe’s accessories.

Maria_Francesca_Pepe_Abby_Wright_LFW

MariaFrancescaPepe LFW A/W 2011. Illustration by Abby Wright.

It was extremely dark in that first room. Save for a few lamps casting red strips of a blood-like glow. Certain points were lit up on the model, prescription the shining metal spikes, cialis 40mg the dull sheen of black leather and the pointed hat. I will be honest now. I had to check that the model was in fact a mannequin. She was. But checking was interesting. The light was so low and I was terrified she would move suddenly. An intimidating mannequin.

red

Hels MFP 5

Hels MFP 1

I wasn’t sure whether the rest of the models would be mannequins too, see but as we entered slightly more light filled rooms, it was obvious that these ones were real. But they were also a higher level of scary. Two looked like mermaids trapped on rocks. Occasionally shifting, they looked confident, bored and yet super vulnerable and TRAPPED. I felt myself want to look at them closer, but then one of them looked me in the eye. Which was a shock. These models, with their purposefully lank, long hair, dark eyes, glossy and pale skin, ghostlike sheer dresses, and fabulous golden accessories looked like aliens. Of course ridiculously beautiful aliens.

Hels MFP 5

Hels MFP 5

Photography Helen Martin

I have to say that I was mesmerised by the back of one model. She had a golden, Egyptian styled headpiece, in the shape of eyes. The three main headpieces were forged by hand in resin and carbon steel, then varnished in opalescent acrylics and hand studded with brass and Swarovski hexagonal studs. They are designed in the style of medieval shields and helmets. The tiara for me was my favourite however, it looked regal and yet delicate and pretty. Also empowering, I imagine a useful attribute for whichever land she/you/me might be in. In contrast, although also empowering, MariaFrancescaPepe‘s shoes looked like something you could definitely cause GBH with. Not pretty, pretty – fierce! In a more sultry way than Rihanna fierce. With enormous spikes at the top, their cream colour, did little to belie their extra ridiculous height and metal danger.

Hels MFP 3

Hels MFP 3

Photography Helen Martin

Like the tiara, the majority of the presentation focused on eyes. Earrings, rings and chains…. EYES. This was a small issue for me. Ever since my brother told me the details of his eye operation at five years old, and then watching Dali’s eye slitting scene – ugh- I’m feeling sick as I write, I have been afraid of anything touching eyes. Or just weird eyes. And in truth… Dali. Cue sweeping generalisation alert: In terms of films, books, art and what I have seen; the 30s, like the 70s, seem like the scariest decades to me. Thus, when the saddest and scariest looking model of them all, looked at me right in the eye, with her incredibly, INTENSELY mesmerising own eyes, I didn’t know what to do. Transfixing model.

Hels MFP 5

Model looking at me… Photography Helen Martin

It’s not surprising that MariaFrancescaPepe has been heavily influenced by Dali’s surrealism for this collection. As I read: ‘Objects of magical meaning and of inner strength. A mask hides and reveals at the same time. Eyes are a mirror for the soul. Dali’s surrealism lesson has been learnt.’ The presentation was tribal and punky, but also ethereal and ghost-like. Almost like facing your own deep reality, that of the soul’s and our desires. The ‘ahhhhhhhhhhh’ music added to these fearful and reflective thoughts. It was as if MariaFrancescaPepe had gone through Indiana Jones’s chest of treasure, added in some Alien, X Files, lots of Dali and then Marilyn Manson on top. Sounds odd, is odd – but also very interesting. It comes as no surprise that Lady GaGa apparently ‘embodies’ MariaFrancescaPepe’s accessories.

Carlotta_Actis_Barone_Abby_Wright_LFW

LFW A/W Carlotta Actis Barone Collection. Illustration by Abby Wright

Well the third of Fashion Mode’s designers this Sunday was simply put: stunningly pretty and explosive. Frosted make up, abortion backcombed and massive hair, nurse beige skyscraper heels and icy pouts – all complimented utterly beautiful pieces from the designer. Carlotta Actis Barone drew gasps and ‘ooohs’ as her models sashayed down the catwalk. These girls were ice princesses. With enormous hoods, viagra fluffy shrugs, pom poms, exposed zips, extravagant fishtail dresses, flamboyant netting and super sleek, pencil skirts; they all had a heavenly, intense, snowy fairytale vibe.

Gemma Milly-Carlotta Actis Barone-Fashion Mode-A-W11

LFW A/W Carlotta Actis Barone Collection. Illustration by Gemma Milly

Reading about the designer, her artistic training has been life -long. Carlotta Actis Barone is the daughter of Italian visual artist Manuela Corti and writer Gianni Actis Barone. Although she discovered her true passion for fashion at the age of 24. During her study at Central St. Martin’s College of Art and Design for a BA in Fashion Print, she went on a gap year, working with Korean designer Moon Young Hee, B.C.B.G Max Azria Manoukian and Balmain.. Explaining the bold colour use in her collection, we discover that Carlotta’s pieces are based around strong, feminine women. She often also has a political edge to her designs, and is extremely passionate about the ethical issues surrounding fashion. These ethical opinions are often reflected in her designs, this season being no exception. The Autumn/Winter 2011 collection focuses on cruelty against animals, with particular focus on fur, and seals. We all know fur is wrong, our animals should be celebrated, not worn. We at Amelia’s feel very fiercely about this. See Amelia’s own ethical fashion book, here.

Gareth A Hopkins Carlotta Fashion Mode AW11

LFW A/W Carlotta Actis Barone Collection. Illustration by Gareth A Hopkins

Hence for Carlotta, the frosted lipped models, beige faux fur and red, white and navy blue palette. The seals being the beige faux fur, the blue the cold sea, and the white symbolic of the snow and ice. Red is obviously the horrendous slaughter of the seals, shown in the underskirts and showpieces.

Carlotta Actis Barone

LFW A/W Carlotta Actis Barone Collection. Illustration by Matilde Sazio

The enormous, white eyelashes, iced lips and enormous hair, paired with fitted 50s influenced dresses, short knitted, luxurious, hooded pieces… faux fur shrugs, hand muffs, sleeves and collar details… were so strong and and almost, beautifully angry. Carlotta also referenced Inuit people in her designs, each of the skirted models wore transparent leggings and geometric patterns ran through the collection, similar to their attire. The whole collection represents how I’m sure many girls would love to look in the winter time. It’s so feminine, heavenly and bold. A mixture of prom dresses, Narnia and Victorian fashion – a fantasy, a drama – and of course in terms of the seals; a harsh reality.

LFW Kayleigh Bluck

LFW A/W Carlotta Actis Barone Collection. Illustration by Kayleigh Bluck

I adored the pronounced peplum dress, the fitted black coat, with full skirt from the waist. The blue, white and red mixed beautifully, if slightly shocking. Which of course, is part of the message Carlotta is making with her show. Without doubt the finale piece, a red fishtail, strapless dress, with a faux fur beige, large shrug, was just INCREDIBLE. I was in love with that dress. I still am in love with that dress. It was the perfect ending to a show that inspired, amazed and informed. This fabulous collection, left me in awe.

Carlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia GregoryCarlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia GregoryCarlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia GregoryCarlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia GregoryCarlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia GregoryCarlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia GregoryCarlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia GregoryCarlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia GregoryCarlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia GregoryCarlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia Gregory

LFW A/W Carlotta Actis Barone Collection. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Buy Amelia’s Book on Ethical Fashion: here. You will also find illustrations by Abby Wright, Gemma Milly and Gareth A. Hopkins in the book.

Oscars - Georgia Coote
Illustration by Georgia Coote

So Colin and Helena have already won their BAFTA awards. Now all eyes are on them for the Oscars. Particularly Colin Firth, treat who has been vigorously doing the rounds as it were, no rx on chat shows such as Ellen. I believe in the aforementioned show, Colin was given some Oscar worthy tuxedo pants. Personally I think Colin should have got an Oscar for A Single Man, one of my favourite films…in the world ever. This article is a small run down of 13 films nominated in the Oscars. Lucky 13…

Abby_Wright_Oscars_Natalie_Portman
Natalie Portman Illustration by Abby Wright

Black Swan revolves around Nataliie Portman’s character winning the lead to Swan Lake, leading to madness and obsession. Driven by perfection, she loses grip of reality entirely as you are taken on a heady journey. I accept it is a genre piece, thus obvious and over the top for a reason, but controversially I didn’t love it. Natalie Portman has been nominated for Best Actress, among five other nominations for the film.

Inception is a fantasy thriller with Leo at the forefront. Christopher Nolan produced some incedible scenes for our eyes to devour and the twists and turns were a thrill to behold. It has eight nominations, including Leonardo DiCaprio for Best Actor.

Helena Bonham Carter by Matilde Sazio
Helena Bonham Carter Illustration by Matilde Sazio

The King’s Speech had people applauding in the cinemas. Everyone has gone mad for this film. And what with Will and Kate getting hitched this year, the Royal family are enjoying a thrust of positive publicity. Colin Firth’s character is a George VI and Helena Bonham Carter, his wife, the Queen Mother have both been nominated for their performances. The film has been nominated for 12 in total.

Colin Firth by Karina Yarv
Colin Firth Illustration by Karina Yarv

Rabbit Hole is about a couple’s life is affected after their young son dies in an accident. Nicole Kidman has been nominated for Best Actress for her role.

The Social Network
David Fincher’s account on the origins of Facebook…

The Kids Are All Right is the story of a lesbian couple whose sperm donor returns into their lives, has four nominations and stars Annette Bening and Julianne Moore.

Toy Story 3 was a sad film in many ways, because it reflected time’s passing and the end of childhood. But Toy Story (1) brings back wonderful memories and has been overplayed to death without inducing even the remotest hatred. Same with Toy Story 2. Toy Story 3 was held in high hopes and it delivered. The film has five nominations, including Best Picture.

Gemma Milly-True Grit
True Grit Illustration by Gemma Milly

True Grit
Joel and Ethan Coen make quite scary, but brilliant films. This remake of the 1969 John Wayne western has received ten nominations in total, these include Jeff Bridges for Best Actor and Hailee Steinfeld for Best Supporting Actress.

Alice In Wonderland sees Alice return to the world of magic and chattering objects, as a 19 year old. She learns of her destiny and meets her old chums. The film, which stars Johnny Depp, has been nominated for three Oscars.

Exit Through the Gift Shop saw Bristol’s Banksy nominated for Best Documenary Feature. The story is about an eccentric French amateur film maker and shop owner trying to befriend Banksy.

127 Hours
Ewww. But also amazing story of overcoming the odds, directed by Danny Boyle. This is a real life story about a climber forced to take extreme action to survive. You all know what I’m talking about I’m sure. James Franco has been nominated for his role as the protagonist and indeed, only character in the film. The film has also been nominated for Best Picture.

Michelle Williams by Russty Brazil
Michelle Williams Illustration by Russty Brazil

Blue Valentine is a stunning and devastating film about falling out of love. Michelle Williams has become numb to her life and husband, whilst Ryan Gosling flails around, trying to save the marriage. Making it all worse. The flashbacks to their falling in love are touching, and the soundtrack by Grizzly Bear made me cry. Michelle Williams has been nominated for Best Actress.

Winter’s Bone
An independent film, Debra Granik’s tale is about a young woman living in a rural community, trying to find her missing father. The film has been nominated for three awards.

Now bring on the pizazz and dresses, quaff, quaff!
Gemma Milly_Nicholas Stevenson
Illustration by Gemma Milly

Nicholas sent me his CD and tape, more about accompanied by a lovely letter about living and musing about in Bristol. One of my favourite pastimes – we may have been staring into the same middle distance…! Like a quill pen into my heart, I am a sucker for a personal letter. Especially on such nice paper. After reading his scribe, I listened to Nicholas’s album: Phantom Sweetheart, available now on Hilldrop Records.

phantom sweetheart cover by nicholas stevenson
Album Cover, Phantom Sweetheart, Illustration by Nicholas Stevenson

It’s a splendid listen. Thoughtful and wistful. It’s like a less brash Spectrals. It has a Californian, surf sound, mixed with a smattering of New York – and the mighty UK. This mixture of locations is perhaps a reflection of Nicholas’s various home locations from birth. Since my initial listen, I now enjoy playing the album when I’m in my own little zone, cleaning. Because you could be anywhere. And if you don’t overly want to be where you are right now, there’s your ride. This interesting, sentimental man will take you away. Or indeed in my present case, scrub that flat ‘til in shines like the summer sun reflecting in my – prematurely purchased, cat eyed – sunnies. I miss you sun. I’d like to meet him to discuss travel, home, love and art. Oh yes, he’s an illustrator too. As Nicholas was so eloquent in his letter, I thought an interview would be perfect. So here it follows:

Nicholas Stevenson with phantom

Could you introduce yourself for us Nicholas…?
Hi there, my name is Nicholas Stevenson and I’m a songwriter and illustrator.

Where are you from originally and where do you reside now?
I currently reside in Cambridgeshire, but I was born in Scotland, lived on an island in the Seychelles for a while, and then moved back to England. I’m also half American so I sometimes have a confusing accent; it’s all a bit confusing actually. I usually give people fake biographies about growing up in the North Pole or being found in the wilderness to avoid explaining the complicated truth…

The Aeroplane Darling cover by Nicholas Stevenson
EP Cover, The Aeroplane Darling, Illustration by Nicholas Stevenson

How long have you been playing music? Could you describe it?
It would be hard to say when I started making music, but I found a tape of myself shouting a song I made about giraffes aged four the other day. The music in the shape it is now probably started about three years ago when I moved away to go to Art College. I had a band in high school that made fuzzy alt rock like the Smashing Pumpkins, but when we went our separate ways I started recording songs on my own in my room. It’s a sort of alt folk sound, with lots of layers, and a big emphasis on melodies.

How long have you been illustrating? Could you describe your style?
I’ve been drawing a lot longer than I’ve been making music, but I don’t think I could ever have considered myself an illustrator up until the last couple of years. I try to make work that’s fun, mysterious and occasionally a bit unsettling where possible.

chase in a sketchbook by Nicholas Stevenson
Chase In A Sketchbook, Illustration by Nicholas Stevenson

Do you use your illustration and music to compliment/influence each other?
Most definitely. I think both of these activities really boil down to an urge for me to be story telling. Both my music and illustration usually revolves around some sort of implied narrative and it’s pretty common for a drawing to influence a lyric or vice versa.

What inspires your creativity, both re: music and illustration?
Cosmography, polar exploration, time travel, childhood, memory, feral children, miniature painting, amateurs and outsiders; a lot of things that I read about or places I visit. I try not to rule anything out as potential fodder for making stories and art about.

bayonets album sleeve
Bayonets Album Sleeve, Illustration by Nicholas Stevenson

Have you ever had a ‘phantom’ sweetheart?
Well not a sweetheart per-se, but in the Seychelles I had two childhood ghost friends called Coco and Silent. Coco lived in a palm tree, and Silent lived on an abandoned ship. They were both only a foot tall, and wore white sheets with eyeholes, although I think Silent wore a baseball cap. The name ‘Phantom Sweetheart’ came about partly because all of my records have had terms of endearment in the name (Dearest Monstrous, The Aeroplane Darling) and I wanted this album to be really ghostly and spectral. Phantom Sweetheart just seemed to be the perfect title.

And what do you think about love and ‘being in love’ ? 
I think it’s a really nice special thing, I’m probably a bit of a softy and a romantic. It might seem like I’ve written a few songs from an anti-love position, but as Harvey Danger once said: “Happiness writes white”.

Have you been in love?
Oh yes mam.

hilldrop business card blank small
Hilldrop Business Cards, Illustration by Nicholas Stevenson

Who else is in your band?
Dan Lewis plays the drums, Tom Harrington plays the bass guitar and glockenspiel whilst Oliver Wilde plays lead guitar.

When/how did you get together?
I met Dan and Tom in Hereford where I was studying at Art College. My manager Joe introduced us and we started arranging my songs and got performing almost straight away as a three piece. Oliver joined the band just last autumn. He not only signed me to his label Hilldrop Records, but he also produced and recorded the album with me in his house in Bristol. We worked really closely together on Phantom Sweetheart and Oliver had a big impact on the way those songs turned out. Of course by the end he knew how to play them all back to front and it seemed like a no-brainer that he should come out on tour with us.

And who is your record label, and how did you get signed?
Hilldrop Records are my label. I think they requested I send them some of my demos in the mail over a year ago. They liked what they heard and I played some gigs for them and we hit it off pretty fast, I started making posters for their shows too. We were all coming from a similar direction and they were interested in promoting art and building it in to the performances. We’d got to know each other reasonably well by the time we decided to sign a contract and make the album.

hilldrop cult 1300_1300
Illustration by Nicholas Stevenson

What was it like going on tour? Did you get inspired?
It was a blast, definitely not glamorous, but great fun. Our car broke down on the way to a sold out show in Bakewell and we had to jettison half the gear and get a taxi. We arrived just in the nick of time with no drums or drummer, and played entirely unplugged to a wonderfully attentive packed room. We spent the night in a big old house; there were teddy bears in the beds. Bakewell is such an old fashioned and charming town (home to the bakewell tart) everyone was so kind and interesting there, it sort of inspired us to play more small places on tour. It doesn’t seem fair that the big cities get all the tour dates, where people can sometimes be so jaded towards the barrage of live music anyway.

Nick25

Where do you see yourself in ten years?
Hopefully doing the same things I’m doing now, but more masterfully. I’m fully aware I have a long way to go and lots of room to grow before I’m satisfied… I just hope I’m fortunate enough to find time for it all.

What about now, what is coming up for you?
At the moment I’m working on a sort of audio zine project called ‘Dead Arm’. It’s going to be a series of cassette tapes, each with a different set of new songs and sounds. Its quite fun telling myself to sit down and make a continuous twenty-minute tape, rather than getting too hung up on individual songs; it makes me less precious and hopefully more inventive. I’m quite excited to see where it goes… 
You can buy Phantom Sweetheart, on Hilldrop Records, here.

Maria_Francesca_Pepe_Abby_Wright_LFW

MariaFrancescaPepe LFW A/W 2011. Illustration by Abby Wright.

It was extremely dark in that first room. Save for a few lamps casting red strips of a blood-like glow. Certain points were lit up on the model, click the shining metal spikes, generic the dull sheen of black leather and the pointed hat. I will be honest now. I had to check that the model was in fact a mannequin. She was. But checking was interesting. The light was so low and I was terrified she would move suddenly. An intimidating mannequin.

red

Hels MFP 5

Hels MFP 1

I wasn’t sure whether the rest of the models would be mannequins too, but as we entered slightly more light filled rooms, it was obvious that these ones were real. But they were also a higher level of scary. Two looked like mermaids trapped on rocks. Occasionally shifting, they looked confident, bored and yet super vulnerable and TRAPPED. I felt myself want to look at them closer, but then one of them looked me in the eye. Which was a shock. These models, with their purposefully lank, long hair, dark eyes, glossy and pale skin, ghostlike sheer dresses, and fabulous golden accessories looked like aliens. Of course ridiculously beautiful aliens.

Hels MFP 5

Hels MFP 5

Photography Helen Martin

I have to say that I was mesmerised by the back of one model. She had a golden, Egyptian styled headpiece, in the shape of eyes. The three main headpieces were forged by hand in resin and carbon steel, then varnished in opalescent acrylics and hand studded with brass and Swarovski hexagonal studs. They are designed in the style of medieval shields and helmets. The tiara for me was my favourite however, it looked regal and yet delicate and pretty. Also empowering, I imagine a useful attribute for whichever land she/you/me might be in. In contrast, although also empowering, MariaFrancescaPepe‘s shoes looked like something you could definitely cause GBH with. Not pretty, pretty – fierce! In a more sultry way than Rihanna fierce. With enormous spikes at the top, their cream colour, did little to belie their extra ridiculous height and metal danger.

Hels MFP 3

Hels MFP 3

Photography Helen Martin

Like the tiara, the majority of the presentation focused on eyes. Earrings, rings and chains…. EYES. This was a small issue for me. Ever since my brother told me the details of his eye operation at five years old, and then watching Dali’s eye slitting scene – ugh- I’m feeling sick as I write, I have been afraid of anything touching eyes. Or just weird eyes. And in truth… Dali. Cue sweeping generalisation alert: In terms of films, books, art and what I have seen; the 30s, like the 70s, seem like the scariest decades to me. Thus, when the saddest and scariest looking model of them all, looked at me right in the eye, with her incredibly, INTENSELY mesmerising own eyes, I didn’t know what to do. Transfixing model.

Hels MFP 5

Model looking at me… Photography Helen Martin

It’s not surprising that MariaFrancescaPepe has been heavily influenced by Dali’s surrealism for this collection. As I read: ‘Objects of magical meaning and of inner strength. A mask hides and reveals at the same time. Eyes are a mirror for the soul. Dali’s surrealism lesson has been learnt.’ The presentation was tribal and punky, but also ethereal and ghost-like. Almost like facing your own deep reality, that of the soul’s and our desires. The ‘ahhhhhhhhhhh’ music added to these fearful and reflective thoughts. It was as if MariaFrancescaPepe had gone through Indiana Jones’s chest of treasure, added in some Alien, X Files, lots of Dali and then Marilyn Manson on top. Sounds odd, is odd – but also very interesting. It comes as no surprise that Lady GaGa apparently ‘embodies’ MariaFrancescaPepe’s accessories.

Oscars - Georgia Coote
Illustration by Georgia Coote

So Colin and Helena have already won their BAFTA awards. Now all eyes are on them for the Oscars. Particularly Colin Firth, generic who has been vigorously doing the rounds as it were, rx on chat shows such as Ellen. I believe in the aforementioned show, pilule Colin was given some Oscar worthy tuxedo pants. Personally I think Colin should have got an Oscar for A Single Man, one of my favourite films…in the world ever. This article is a small run down of 13 films nominated in the Oscars. Lucky 13…

Abby_Wright_Oscars_Natalie_Portman
Natalie Portman Illustration by Abby Wright

Black Swan revolves around Nataliie Portman’s character winning the lead to Swan Lake, leading to madness and obsession. Driven by perfection, she loses grip of reality entirely as you are taken on a heady journey. I accept it is a genre piece, thus obvious and over the top for a reason, but controversially I didn’t love it. Natalie Portman has been nominated for Best Actress, among five other nominations for the film.

Inception is a fantasy thriller with Leo at the forefront. Christopher Nolan produced some incedible scenes for our eyes to devour and the twists and turns were a thrill to behold. It has eight nominations, including Leonardo DiCaprio for Best Actor.

Helena Bonham Carter by Matilde Sazio
Helena Bonham Carter Illustration by Matilde Sazio

The King’s Speech had people applauding in the cinemas. Everyone has gone mad for this film. And what with Will and Kate getting hitched this year, the Royal family are enjoying a thrust of positive publicity. Colin Firth’s character is a George VI and Helena Bonham Carter, his wife, the Queen Mother have both been nominated for their performances. The film has been nominated for 12 in total.

Colin Firth by Karina Yarv
Colin Firth Illustration by Karina Yarv

Rabbit Hole is about a couple’s life is affected after their young son dies in an accident. Nicole Kidman has been nominated for Best Actress for her role.

The Social Network
David Fincher’s account on the origins of Facebook…

The Kids Are All Right is the story of a lesbian couple whose sperm donor returns into their lives, has four nominations and stars Annette Bening and Julianne Moore.

Toy Story 3 was a sad film in many ways, because it reflected time’s passing and the end of childhood. But Toy Story (1) brings back wonderful memories and has been overplayed to death without inducing even the remotest hatred. Same with Toy Story 2. Toy Story 3 was held in high hopes and it delivered. The film has five nominations, including Best Picture.

Gemma Milly-True Grit
True Grit Illustration by Gemma Milly

True Grit
Joel and Ethan Coen make quite scary, but brilliant films. This remake of the 1969 John Wayne western has received ten nominations in total, these include Jeff Bridges for Best Actor and Hailee Steinfeld for Best Supporting Actress.

Alice In Wonderland sees Alice return to the world of magic and chattering objects, as a 19 year old. She learns of her destiny and meets her old chums. The film, which stars Johnny Depp, has been nominated for three Oscars.

Exit Through the Gift Shop saw Bristol’s Banksy nominated for Best Documenary Feature. The story is about an eccentric French amateur film maker and shop owner trying to befriend Banksy.

127 Hours
Ewww. But also amazing story of overcoming the odds, directed by Danny Boyle. This is a real life story about a climber forced to take extreme action to survive. You all know what I’m talking about I’m sure. James Franco has been nominated for his role as the protagonist and indeed, only character in the film. The film has also been nominated for Best Picture.

Michelle Williams by Russty Brazil
Michelle Williams Illustration by Russty Brazil

Blue Valentine is a stunning and devastating film about falling out of love. Michelle Williams has become numb to her life and husband, whilst Ryan Gosling flails around, trying to save the marriage. Making it all worse. The flashbacks to their falling in love are touching, and the soundtrack by Grizzly Bear made me cry. Michelle Williams has been nominated for Best Actress.

Winter’s Bone
An independent film, Debra Granik’s tale is about a young woman living in a rural community, trying to find her missing father. The film has been nominated for three awards.

Now bring on the pizazz and dresses, quaff, quaff!
Oscars - Georgia Coote
Illustration by Georgia Coote

So Colin and Helena have already won their BAFTA awards. Now all eyes are on them for the Oscars. Particularly Colin Firth, prostate who has been vigorously doing the rounds as it were, visit this on chat shows such as Ellen. I believe in the aforementioned show, Colin was given some Oscar worthy tuxedo pants. Personally I think Colin should have got an Oscar for A Single Man, one of my favourite films…in the world ever. This article is a small run down of 13 films nominated in the Oscars. Lucky 13…

Abby_Wright_Oscars_Natalie_Portman
Natalie Portman Illustration by Abby Wright

Black Swan revolves around Nataliie Portman’s character winning the lead to Swan Lake, leading to madness and obsession. Driven by perfection, she loses grip of reality entirely as you are taken on a heady journey. I accept it is a genre piece, thus obvious and over the top for a reason, but controversially I didn’t love it. Natalie Portman has been nominated for Best Actress, among five other nominations for the film.

Inception is a fantasy thriller with Leo at the forefront. Christopher Nolan produced some incedible scenes for our eyes to devour and the twists and turns were a thrill to behold. It has eight nominations, including Leonardo DiCaprio for Best Actor.

Helena Bonham Carter by Matilde Sazio
Helena Bonham Carter Illustration by Matilde Sazio

The King’s Speech had people applauding in the cinemas. Everyone has gone mad for this film. And what with Will and Kate getting hitched this year, the Royal family are enjoying a thrust of positive publicity. Colin Firth’s character is a George VI and Helena Bonham Carter, his wife, the Queen Mother have both been nominated for their performances. The film has been nominated for 12 in total.

Colin Firth by Karina Yarv
Colin Firth Illustration by Karina Yarv

Rabbit Hole is about a couple’s life is affected after their young son dies in an accident. Nicole Kidman has been nominated for Best Actress for her role.

The Social Network
David Fincher’s account on the origins of Facebook…

The Kids Are All Right is the story of a lesbian couple whose sperm donor returns into their lives, has four nominations and stars Annette Bening and Julianne Moore.

Toy Story 3 was a sad film in many ways, because it reflected time’s passing and the end of childhood. But Toy Story (1) brings back wonderful memories and has been overplayed to death without inducing even the remotest hatred. Same with Toy Story 2. Toy Story 3 was held in high hopes and it delivered. The film has five nominations, including Best Picture.

Gemma Milly-True Grit
True Grit Illustration by Gemma Milly

True Grit
Joel and Ethan Coen make quite scary, but brilliant films. This remake of the 1969 John Wayne western has received ten nominations in total, these include Jeff Bridges for Best Actor and Hailee Steinfeld for Best Supporting Actress.

Alice In Wonderland sees Alice return to the world of magic and chattering objects, as a 19 year old. She learns of her destiny and meets her old chums. The film, which stars Johnny Depp, has been nominated for three Oscars.

Exit Through the Gift Shop saw Bristol’s Banksy nominated for Best Documenary Feature. The story is about an eccentric French amateur film maker and shop owner trying to befriend Banksy.

127 Hours
Ewww. But also amazing story of overcoming the odds, directed by Danny Boyle. This is a real life story about a climber forced to take extreme action to survive. You all know what I’m talking about I’m sure. James Franco has been nominated for his role as the protagonist and indeed, only character in the film. The film has also been nominated for Best Picture.

Michelle Williams by Russty Brazil
Michelle Williams Illustration by Russty Brazil

Blue Valentine is a stunning and devastating film about falling out of love. Michelle Williams has become numb to her life and husband, whilst Ryan Gosling flails around, trying to save the marriage. Making it all worse. The flashbacks to their falling in love are touching, and the soundtrack by Grizzly Bear made me cry. Michelle Williams has been nominated for Best Actress.

Winter’s Bone
An independent film, Debra Granik’s tale is about a young woman living in a rural community, trying to find her missing father. The film has been nominated for three awards.

Now bring on the pizazz and dresses, quaff, quaff!
Oscars - Georgia Coote
Illustration by Georgia Coote

So Colin and Helena have already won their BAFTA awards. Now all eyes are on them for the Oscars. Particularly Colin Firth, medical who has been vigorously doing the rounds as it were, on chat shows such as Ellen. I believe in the aforementioned show, Colin was given some Oscar worthy tuxedo pants. Personally I think Colin should have got an Oscar for A Single Man, one of my favourite films…in the world ever. This article is a small run down of 13 films nominated in the Oscars. Lucky 13…

Abby_Wright_Oscars_Natalie_Portman
Natalie Portman Illustration by Abby Wright

Black Swan revolves around Nataliie Portman’s character winning the lead to Swan Lake, leading to madness and obsession. Driven by perfection, she loses grip of reality entirely as you are taken on a heady journey. I accept it is a genre piece, thus obvious and over the top for a reason, but controversially I didn’t love it. Natalie Portman was fantastic though, and has been nominated for Best Actress, among five other nominations for the film.

Inception is a fantasy thriller with Leo at the forefront. Christopher Nolan produced some incedible scenes for our eyes to devour and the twists and turns were a thrill to behold. It has eight nominations, including Leonardo DiCaprio for Best Actor.

Helena Bonham Carter by Matilde Sazio
Helena Bonham Carter Illustration by Matilde Sazio

The King’s Speech had people applauding in the cinemas. Everyone has gone mad for this film. And what with Will and Kate getting hitched this year, the Royal family are enjoying a thrust of positive publicity. Colin Firth’s character is a George VI and Helena Bonham Carter, his wife, the Queen Mother have both been nominated for their performances. The film has been nominated for 12 in total.

Colin Firth by Karina Yarv
Colin Firth Illustration by Karina Yarv

Rabbit Hole is about a couple’s life is affected after their young son dies in an accident. Nicole Kidman has been nominated for Best Actress for her role.

The Social Network
David Fincher’s account on the origins of Facebook…

The Kids Are All Right is the story of a lesbian couple whose sperm donor returns into their lives, has four nominations and stars Annette Bening and Julianne Moore.

Toy Story 3 was a sad film in many ways, because it reflected time’s passing and the end of childhood. But Toy Story (1) brings back wonderful memories and has been overplayed to death without inducing even the remotest hatred. Same with Toy Story 2. Toy Story 3 was held in high hopes and it delivered. The film has five nominations, including Best Picture.

Gemma Milly-True Grit
True Grit Illustration by Gemma Milly

True Grit:Joel and Ethan Coen make quite scary, but brilliant films. This remake of the 1969 John Wayne western has received ten nominations in total, these include Jeff Bridges for Best Actor and Hailee Steinfeld for Best Supporting Actress.

Alice In Wonderland sees Alice return to the world of magic and chattering objects, as a 19 year old. She learns of her destiny and meets her old chums. The film, which stars Johnny Depp, has been nominated for three Oscars.

Exit Through the Gift Shop saw Bristol’s Banksy nominated for Best Documenary Feature. The story is about an eccentric French amateur film maker and shop owner trying to befriend Banksy.

127 Hours
Ewww. But also amazing story of overcoming the odds, directed by Danny Boyle. This is a real life story about a climber forced to take extreme action to survive. You all know what I’m talking about I’m sure. James Franco has been nominated for his role as the protagonist and indeed, only character in the film. The film has also been nominated for Best Picture.

Michelle Williams by Russty Brazil
Michelle Williams Illustration by Russty Brazil

Blue Valentine is a stunning and devastating film about falling out of love. Michelle Williams has become numb to her life and husband, whilst Ryan Gosling flails around, trying to save the marriage. Making it all worse. The flashbacks to their falling in love are touching, and the soundtrack by Grizzly Bear made me cry. Michelle Williams has been nominated for Best Actress.

Winter’s Bone:An independent film, Debra Granik’s tale is about a young woman living in a rural community, trying to find her missing father. The film has been nominated for three awards.

Now bring on the pizazz and dresses, quaff, quaff!
Oscars - Georgia Coote
Illustration by Georgia Coote

So Colin and Helena have already won their BAFTA awards. Now all eyes are on them for the Oscars. Particularly Colin Firth, page who has been vigorously doing the rounds as it were, ailment on chat shows such as Ellen. I believe in the aforementioned show, Colin was given some Oscar worthy tuxedo pants. Personally I think Colin should have got an Oscar for A Single Man, one of my favourite films…in the world ever. This article is a small run down of 13 films nominated in the Oscars. Lucky 13…

Abby_Wright_Oscars_Natalie_Portman
Natalie Portman Illustration by Abby Wright

Black Swan revolves around Nataliie Portman’s character winning the lead to Swan Lake, leading to madness and obsession. Driven by perfection, she loses grip of reality entirely as you are taken on a heady journey. I accept it is a genre piece, thus obvious and over the top for a reason, but controversially I didn’t love it. Natalie Portman was fantastic though, and has been nominated for Best Actress, among five other nominations for the film.

Inception is a fantasy thriller with Leo at the forefront. Christopher Nolan produced some incedible scenes for our eyes to devour and the twists and turns were a thrill to behold. It has eight nominations, including Leonardo DiCaprio for Best Actor.

Helena Bonham Carter by Matilde Sazio
Helena Bonham Carter Illustration by Matilde Sazio

The King’s Speech had people applauding in the cinemas. Everyone has gone mad for this film. And what with Will and Kate getting hitched this year, the Royal family are enjoying a thrust of positive publicity. Colin Firth’s character is a George VI and Helena Bonham Carter, his wife, the Queen Mother have both been nominated for their performances. The film has been nominated for 12 in total.

Colin Firth by Karina Yarv
Colin Firth Illustration by Karina Yarv

Rabbit Hole is about a couple’s life is affected after their young son dies in an accident. Nicole Kidman has been nominated for Best Actress for her role.

The Social Network: David Fincher’s account on the origins of Facebook…

The Kids Are All Right is the story of a lesbian couple whose sperm donor returns into their lives, has four nominations and stars Annette Bening and Julianne Moore.

Toy Story 3 was a sad film in many ways, because it reflected time’s passing and the end of childhood. But Toy Story (1) brings back wonderful memories and has been overplayed to death without inducing even the remotest hatred. Same with Toy Story 2. Toy Story 3 was held in high hopes and it delivered. The film has five nominations, including Best Picture.

Gemma Milly-True Grit
True Grit Illustration by Gemma Milly

True Grit:Joel and Ethan Coen make quite scary, but brilliant films. This remake of the 1969 John Wayne western has received ten nominations in total, these include Jeff Bridges for Best Actor and Hailee Steinfeld for Best Supporting Actress.

Alice In Wonderland sees Alice return to the world of magic and chattering objects, as a 19 year old. She learns of her destiny and meets her old chums. The film, which stars Johnny Depp, has been nominated for three Oscars.

Exit Through the Gift Shop saw Bristol’s Banksy nominated for Best Documenary Feature. The story is about an eccentric French amateur film maker and shop owner trying to befriend Banksy.

127 Hours: Ewww. But also amazing story of overcoming the odds, directed by Danny Boyle. This is a real life story about a climber forced to take extreme action to survive. You all know what I’m talking about I’m sure. James Franco has been nominated for his role as the protagonist and indeed, only character in the film. The film has also been nominated for Best Picture.

Michelle Williams by Russty Brazil
Michelle Williams Illustration by Russty Brazil

Blue Valentine is a stunning and devastating film about falling out of love. Michelle Williams has become numb to her life and husband, whilst Ryan Gosling flails around, trying to save the marriage. Making it all worse. The flashbacks to their falling in love are touching, and the soundtrack by Grizzly Bear made me cry. Michelle Williams has been nominated for Best Actress.

Winter’s Bone:An independent film, Debra Granik’s tale is about a young woman living in a rural community, trying to find her missing father. The film has been nominated for three awards.

Now bring on the pizazz and dresses, quaff, quaff!
Oscars - Georgia Coote
Illustration by Georgia Coote

So Colin and Helena have already won their BAFTA awards. Now all eyes are on them for the Oscars. Particularly Colin Firth, patient who has been vigorously doing the rounds as it were, buy on chat shows such as Ellen. I believe in the aforementioned show, Colin was given some Oscar worthy tuxedo pants. Personally I think Colin should have got an Oscar for A Single Man, one of my favourite films…in the world ever. This article is a small run down of 13 films nominated in the Oscars. Lucky 13…

Abby_Wright_Oscars_Natalie_Portman
Natalie Portman Illustration by Abby Wright

Black Swan revolves around Nataliie Portman’s character winning the lead to Swan Lake, leading to madness and obsession. Driven by perfection, she loses grip of reality entirely as you are taken on a heady journey. I accept it is a genre piece, thus obvious and over the top for a reason, but controversially I didn’t love it. Natalie Portman was fantastic though, and has been nominated for Best Actress, among five other nominations for the film.

Inception is a fantasy thriller with Leo at the forefront. Christopher Nolan produced some incedible scenes for our eyes to devour and the twists and turns were a thrill to behold. It has eight nominations, including Leonardo DiCaprio for Best Actor.

Helena Bonham Carter by Matilde Sazio
Helena Bonham Carter Illustration by Matilde Sazio

The King’s Speech had people applauding in the cinemas. Everyone has gone mad for this film. And what with Will and Kate getting hitched this year, the Royal family are enjoying a thrust of positive publicity. Colin Firth’s character is a George VI and Helena Bonham Carter, his wife, the Queen Mother have both been nominated for their performances. The film has been nominated for 12 awards in total.

Colin Firth by Karina Yarv
Colin Firth Illustration by Karina Yarv

Rabbit Hole is about a couple’s life is affected after their young son dies in an accident. Nicole Kidman has been nominated for Best Actress for her role.

The Social Network: David Fincher’s account on the origins of Facebook…

The Kids Are All Right is the story of a lesbian couple whose sperm donor returns into their lives, has four nominations and stars Annette Bening and Julianne Moore.

Toy Story 3 was a sad film in many ways, because it reflected time’s passing and the end of childhood. But Toy Story (1) brings back wonderful memories and has been overplayed to death without inducing even the remotest hatred. Same with Toy Story 2. Toy Story 3 was held in high hopes and it delivered. The film has five nominations, including Best Picture.

Gemma Milly-True Grit
True Grit Illustration by Gemma Milly

True Grit:Joel and Ethan Coen make quite scary, but brilliant films. This remake of the 1969 John Wayne western has received ten nominations in total, these include Jeff Bridges for Best Actor and Hailee Steinfeld for Best Supporting Actress.

Alice In Wonderland sees Alice return to the world of magic and chattering objects, as a 19 year old. She learns of her destiny and meets her old chums. The film, which stars Johnny Depp, has been nominated for three Oscars.

Exit Through the Gift Shop saw Bristol’s Banksy nominated for Best Documenary Feature. The story is about an eccentric French amateur film maker and shop owner trying to befriend Banksy.

127 Hours: Ewww. But also amazing story of overcoming the odds, directed by Danny Boyle. This is a real life story about a climber forced to take extreme action to survive. You all know what I’m talking about I’m sure. James Franco has been nominated for his role as the protagonist and indeed, only character in the film. The film has also been nominated for Best Picture.

Michelle Williams by Russty Brazil
Michelle Williams Illustration by Russty Brazil

Blue Valentine is a stunning and devastating film about falling out of love. Michelle Williams has become numb to her life and husband, whilst Ryan Gosling flails around, trying to save the marriage. Making it all worse. The flashbacks to their falling in love are touching, and the soundtrack by Grizzly Bear made me cry. Michelle Williams has been nominated for Best Actress.

Winter’s Bone:An independent film, Debra Granik’s tale is about a young woman living in a rural community, trying to find her missing father. The film has been nominated for three awards.

Now bring on the pizazz and dresses, quaff, quaff!
Eugon_Choi2_by_Karolina_Burdon
Eudon Choi LFW A/W 2011 Collection, pills illustration by Karolina Burdon

I’m going to say saddles. And horses. It’s not just because there was a saddle on the invite to the show. You couldn’t escape the leather straps at Eudon Choi. I wasn’t entirely sure what they were all for, stuff but they were clearly beautifully soft and of the highest quality. One of the outfits a model wore, pills involved an all in one – I think, I’d have to study it at closer range – contraption, that worked like braces and a belt. The braces went down to the top of the thighs and featured gold loops and studs. Worn with a white shirt and beige skirt, it was very old English, equestrian. Open toe wedge boots were worn with short black dresses. Navy, orangey browns, tans, greys and rusty colours were prominent. Nothing too artificial, or over the top. You could imagine wearing these to work. The funnel neck coats, a line skirts, three quarter length sleeves and loose shouldered pieces, were all positively clean and sharp. I personally liked a long sleeved floaty dress, with a wide diagonal off white stripe across the body, from the neck to the hemline. It had a very high waisted leather belt, almost making it empire lined, and looked feminine and understated.

Eudon_Choi_BY_Avril_Kelly
Eudon Choi LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Avril Kelly

The skirts got shorter and then wider as the show continued. A wide grey/cream, short coat, made an appearance. It featured two strips of brown leather towards its hem, and was tailored to perfection. The floatier dressses hit midi length and full length, with slits to the thigh. These were looser, most strapless or with a single knotted strap, over the shoulder. The look was very together. Like the women who carry small tubes of expensive moisturiser and have ipad covers made from baby goat leather. And an actual ipad, or four.

Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1575
Andy Bumpus sketching in his ACOFI Moleskine notebook for Fashion Scout.

Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1574Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1637Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1597
Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1631Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1625Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1607Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1585Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1643
Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1640

Eudon Choi LFW A/W 2011 Collection, photography by Amelia Gregory

Everything felt very structured, slightly confined and purposeful. Asked how he would describe an Eudon Choi woman, the designer said: “She likes to stand out from the crowd yet look stylish and sophisticated. She looks individual, with an edge.” That’s perfectly achieved. Organised and controlled, a wearer of Chanel’s Red No.5 lipstick. She positively thrives over a bit of hard business with her espresso. Not a second to spare, she doesn’t even have time to look you up and down darling. Too busy looking ahead. Nice show.
Maria_Francesca_Pepe_Abby_Wright_LFW

MariaFrancescaPepe LFW A/W 2011. Illustration by Abby Wright.

It was extremely dark in that first room. Save for a few lamps casting red strips of a blood-like glow. Certain points were lit up on the model, view the shining metal spikes, ed the dull sheen of black leather and the pointed hat. I will be honest now. I had to check that the model was in fact a mannequin. She was. But checking was interesting. The light was so low and I was terrified she would move suddenly. An intimidating mannequin.

red

Hels MFP 5

Hels MFP 1

I wasn’t sure whether the rest of the models would be mannequins too, but as we entered slightly more light filled rooms, it was obvious that these ones were real. But they were also a higher level of scary. Two looked like mermaids trapped on rocks. Occasionally shifting, they looked confident, bored and yet super vulnerable and TRAPPED. I felt myself want to look at them closer, but then one of them looked me in the eye. Which was a shock. These models, with their purposefully lank, long hair, dark eyes, glossy and pale skin, ghostlike sheer dresses, and fabulous golden accessories looked like aliens. Of course ridiculously beautiful aliens.

Hels MFP 5

Hels MFP 5

Photography Helen Martin

I have to say that I was mesmerised by the back of one model. She had a golden, Egyptian styled headpiece, in the shape of eyes. The three main headpieces were forged by hand in resin and carbon steel, then varnished in opalescent acrylics and hand studded with brass and Swarovski hexagonal studs. They are designed in the style of medieval shields and helmets. The tiara for me was my favourite however, it looked regal and yet delicate and pretty. Also empowering, I imagine a useful attribute for whichever land she/you/me might be in. In contrast, although also empowering, MariaFrancescaPepe‘s shoes looked like something you could definitely cause GBH with. Not pretty, pretty – fierce! In a more sultry way than Rihanna fierce. With enormous spikes at the top, their cream colour, did little to belie their extra ridiculous height and metal danger.

Hels MFP 3

Hels MFP 3

Photography Helen Martin

Like the tiara, the majority of the presentation focused on eyes. Earrings, rings and chains…. EYES. This was a small issue for me. Ever since my brother told me the details of his eye operation at five years old, and then watching Dali’s eye slitting scene – ugh- I’m feeling sick as I write, I have been afraid of anything touching eyes. Or just weird eyes. And in truth… Dali. Cue sweeping generalisation alert: In terms of films, books, art and what I have seen; the 30s, like the 70s, seem like the scariest decades to me. Thus, when the saddest and scariest looking model of them all, looked at me right in the eye, with her incredibly, INTENSELY mesmerising own eyes, I didn’t know what to do. Transfixing model.

Hels MFP 5

Model looking at me… Photography Helen Martin

It’s not surprising that MariaFrancescaPepe has been heavily influenced by Dali’s surrealism for this collection. As I read: ‘Objects of magical meaning and of inner strength. A mask hides and reveals at the same time. Eyes are a mirror for the soul. Dali’s surrealism lesson has been learnt.’ The presentation was tribal and punky, but also ethereal and ghost-like. Almost like facing your own deep reality, that of the soul’s and our desires. The ‘ahhhhhhhhhhh’ music added to these fearful and reflective thoughts. It was as if MariaFrancescaPepe had gone through Indiana Jones’s chest of treasure, added in some Alien, X Files, lots of Dali and then Marilyn Manson on top. Sounds odd, is odd – but also very interesting. It comes as no surprise that Lady GaGa apparently ‘embodies’ MariaFrancescaPepe’s accessories.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Lesley Barnes
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Lesley Barnes.

On arrival at the Topshop space in Billingsgate for Mary Katrantzou I pulled up my Pashley beneath a phalanx of official LFW cars and blacked out big name magazine people carriers. I usually find it takes me approximately the same amount of time to race between venues on my bike alongside said official cars, viagra dosage no doubt being looked down upon by wealthy magazines’ fashion editors from behind those blacked out panes, but maybe I should post an ode to my preferred transport, in much the same vein that Susie Bubble has been posting about her sponsored Orla Kiely car?

Pashley
My Pashley locked up outside Somerset House.

I love cycling but it was a struggle – as usual – to lock my bike against a post without it, me and my cycling pannier capsizing in an (un)attractive pile. At times like these I very much hope I’m not being watched by those who are able to elegantly descend from their car in vertiginous heels.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

We were only granted one ticket to Mary Katrantzou, beautifully pearlised and colourfully printed on heavy card. Clearly then, there was no chance that anyone else was going to lay their hands on it. Having scoped the layout during Michael Van Der Ham the day before I headed straight for what I considered the best position in the cavernous hall and discovered that I was sitting next to the proud mother of Mary’s right hand man, one Alexander Giantsis, also of Greek extraction… she quickly voiced her motherly worries about her son’s lack of sleep. That would be none then, the night before.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Mira Tazkia
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Mira Tazkia.

My spot proved the perfect place to capture the models as they swung around to face the bank of cameras right at the end of the looong catwalk. Mum Stephanie kept up a running commentary as I tried to concentrate on capturing the clothes whirring past me at the hyper fast pace that has characterised the catwalk shows this season.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh.

Despite her own concerns that she’s pushing the parameters of what people will wear Mary Katrantzou has quickly built up a glowing reputation for her clashing prints and clever architectural constructions. Last season she took architecture as her starting point but this time she looked to interiors, quoting the Marchesa Luisa Casati in her press release: “I want to be a living work of art.”

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon.

Clever hooping was attached at waist level to create a kind of riser inspired by the shape of vases, Fabergé eggs and porcelain bowls – beautiful, but the kind of thing that only the thinnest of girls can get away with wearing. More successful for bigger girls would be the wide hipped dresses, curved shoulders and over skirts that stood proud from the figure. Clashing prints inspired by “priceless objets d’art” were cut and merged to create a profusion of pattern and colour in print, embroidery and intarsia knits.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana FariaMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana FariaMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana Faria
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana Faria.

One dress featured an extraordinary skirt covered in three dimensional roses in a diagonal pattern – certainly not for the faint hearted… or those who would like to be comfortable when sitting down. Towards the end a series of chiffon skirts swept onto the catwalk, billowing dramatically around the figure.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Sarah Matthews
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Sarah Matthews.

This A/W show was everything I had hoped for: Mary Katrantzou, a fashion designer after my own maximalist heart. I’m so glad that someone out there is confident enough to translate my type of design onto clothing.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can see more fashion illustration by Lesley Barnes in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,Alexander Giantsis, ,Billingsgate, ,Ellie Sutton, ,Fabergé, ,Jessica Singh, ,Joana Faria, ,Karolina Burdon, ,Lesley Barnes, ,Marchesa Luisa Casati, ,Mary Katrantzou, ,Michael van der Ham, ,Mira Tazkia, ,New Gen, ,Orla Kiely, ,print, ,Sarah Matthews, ,Susie Bubble, ,topshop

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Mary Katrantzou

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Lesley Barnes
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Lesley Barnes.

On arrival at the Topshop space in Billingsgate for Mary Katrantzou I pulled up my Pashley beneath a phalanx of official LFW cars and blacked out big name magazine people carriers. I usually find it takes me approximately the same amount of time to race between venues on my bike alongside said official cars, no doubt being looked down upon by wealthy magazines’ fashion editors from behind those blacked out panes, but maybe I should post an ode to my preferred transport, in much the same vein that Susie Bubble has been posting about her sponsored Orla Kiely car?

Pashley
My Pashley locked up outside Somerset House.

I love cycling but it was a struggle – as usual – to lock my bike against a post without it, me and my cycling pannier capsizing in an (un)attractive pile. At times like these I very much hope I’m not being watched by those who are able to elegantly descend from their car in vertiginous heels.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

We were only granted one ticket to Mary Katrantzou, beautifully pearlised and colourfully printed on heavy card. Clearly then, there was no chance that anyone else was going to lay their hands on it. Having scoped the layout during Michael Van Der Ham the day before I headed straight for what I considered the best position in the cavernous hall and discovered that I was sitting next to the proud mother of Mary’s right hand man, one Alexander Giantsis, also of Greek extraction… she quickly voiced her motherly worries about her son’s lack of sleep. That would be none then, the night before.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Mira Tazkia
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Mira Tazkia.

My spot proved the perfect place to capture the models as they swung around to face the bank of cameras right at the end of the looong catwalk. Mum Stephanie kept up a running commentary as I tried to concentrate on capturing the clothes whirring past me at the hyper fast pace that has characterised the catwalk shows this season.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh.

Despite her own concerns that she’s pushing the parameters of what people will wear Mary Katrantzou has quickly built up a glowing reputation for her clashing prints and clever architectural constructions. Last season she took architecture as her starting point but this time she looked to interiors, quoting the Marchesa Luisa Casati in her press release: “I want to be a living work of art.”

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon.

Clever hooping was attached at waist level to create a kind of riser inspired by the shape of vases, Fabergé eggs and porcelain bowls – beautiful, but the kind of thing that only the thinnest of girls can get away with wearing. More successful for bigger girls would be the wide hipped dresses, curved shoulders and over skirts that stood proud from the figure. Clashing prints inspired by “priceless objets d’art” were cut and merged to create a profusion of pattern and colour in print, embroidery and intarsia knits.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana FariaMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana FariaMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana Faria
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana Faria.

One dress featured an extraordinary skirt covered in three dimensional roses in a diagonal pattern – certainly not for the faint hearted… or those who would like to be comfortable when sitting down. Towards the end a series of chiffon skirts swept onto the catwalk, billowing dramatically around the figure.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Sarah Matthews
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Sarah Matthews.

This A/W show was everything I had hoped for: Mary Katrantzou, a fashion designer after my own maximalist heart. I’m so glad that someone out there is confident enough to translate my type of design onto clothing.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can see more fashion illustration by Lesley Barnes in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,Alexander Giantsis, ,Billingsgate, ,Ellie Sutton, ,Fabergé, ,Jessica Singh, ,Joana Faria, ,Karolina Burdon, ,Lesley Barnes, ,Marchesa Luisa Casati, ,Mary Katrantzou, ,Michael van der Ham, ,Mira Tazkia, ,New Gen, ,Orla Kiely, ,print, ,Sarah Matthews, ,Susie Bubble, ,topshop

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Osman (by Amelia)

Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

Osman. Not a name that I’m overly familiar with, story cheapest although we have frequently written about designer Osman Yousefzada. He’s trained the likes of the super talented Henrietta Ludgate and when he showed as part of Fashion in Motion at the V&A we were there to admire his work.

Osman. Photography by Tim Adey
Osman. Photography by Tim Adey.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger
Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger.

So it was that with enthusiasm I went to my first Osman show, drug dosage settling on the front row to much amusement as another contributor befriended the head buyer of Browns. Next along some buyers threw a hissy fit when asked to move in favour of Liberty, at which they threatened to leave the show and what’s worse, cancel their Osman orders. I do find these insights into the actual trade part of LFW most intriguing – buyers are massively important at the shows where large orders from key retailers really matter… namely the shows in the BFC tent. And it’s the Liberty and Browns of this world which are Gods, something which lesser shop buyers may discover the embarrassing way. Needless to say I kept my head down and stuck to admiring the ink splodge catwalk, protected the entire length by guards.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
How much do I love this dress?!

Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

The Afghan designer is fabled for his clean, regal lines and this was much in evidence as the show opened with a stunning white and royal blue dress that mirrored the catwalk design, which in turn was inspired by a series of lightbox installations by the artist Catherine Yass. Satu Fox wrote in 2009 of Osman’s refusal to follow current trends and this still felt very true in a beautifully elegant show where pared down tailoring was absolutely the order of the day.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger
Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger.

Wide legged trousers, A-line maxi-dresses, a caped dress underscored with a splash of orange, beautiful marled grey boucle wool fabrics… and an intriguing gold apron outfit which opened at the back. I could imagine almost every outfit being worn and admired… there was no filler here. The show ended with a return to the royal blue splotch theme, this time across the breast area of a searing fuchsia maxi-dress. This was an extremely confident collection that explained to me precisely why Osman has the buyers salivating. Absolutely gorgeous. If only he hadn’t ruined it with that one piece of what I presume was fur… entirely unnecessary.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Fur? Or an interesting use of alpaca wool? We’re not sure, and nor is anyone else… I really do hope the latter.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can read Naomi Law’s equally admiring review here.

Categories ,Afghan, ,BFC Tent, ,Browns, ,Buyers, ,Catherine Yass, ,Decommissioned, ,Ellie Sutton, ,Fur, ,Henrietta Ludgate, ,Holly Monger, ,lfw, ,liberty, ,London Fashion Week, ,Naomi Law, ,Osman, ,Osman Yousefzada, ,Satu Fox, ,Somerset House, ,Tim Adey

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Osman (by Amelia)

Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

Osman. Not a name that I’m overly familiar with, story cheapest although we have frequently written about designer Osman Yousefzada. He’s trained the likes of the super talented Henrietta Ludgate and when he showed as part of Fashion in Motion at the V&A we were there to admire his work.

Osman. Photography by Tim Adey
Osman. Photography by Tim Adey.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger
Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger.

So it was that with enthusiasm I went to my first Osman show, drug dosage settling on the front row to much amusement as another contributor befriended the head buyer of Browns. Next along some buyers threw a hissy fit when asked to move in favour of Liberty, at which they threatened to leave the show and what’s worse, cancel their Osman orders. I do find these insights into the actual trade part of LFW most intriguing – buyers are massively important at the shows where large orders from key retailers really matter… namely the shows in the BFC tent. And it’s the Liberty and Browns of this world which are Gods, something which lesser shop buyers may discover the embarrassing way. Needless to say I kept my head down and stuck to admiring the ink splodge catwalk, protected the entire length by guards.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
How much do I love this dress?!

Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

The Afghan designer is fabled for his clean, regal lines and this was much in evidence as the show opened with a stunning white and royal blue dress that mirrored the catwalk design, which in turn was inspired by a series of lightbox installations by the artist Catherine Yass. Satu Fox wrote in 2009 of Osman’s refusal to follow current trends and this still felt very true in a beautifully elegant show where pared down tailoring was absolutely the order of the day.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger
Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger.

Wide legged trousers, A-line maxi-dresses, a caped dress underscored with a splash of orange, beautiful marled grey boucle wool fabrics… and an intriguing gold apron outfit which opened at the back. I could imagine almost every outfit being worn and admired… there was no filler here. The show ended with a return to the royal blue splotch theme, this time across the breast area of a searing fuchsia maxi-dress. This was an extremely confident collection that explained to me precisely why Osman has the buyers salivating. Absolutely gorgeous. If only he hadn’t ruined it with that one piece of what I presume was fur… entirely unnecessary.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Fur? Or an interesting use of alpaca wool? We’re not sure, and nor is anyone else… I really do hope the latter.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can read Naomi Law’s equally admiring review here.

Categories ,Afghan, ,BFC Tent, ,Browns, ,Buyers, ,Catherine Yass, ,Decommissioned, ,Ellie Sutton, ,Fur, ,Henrietta Ludgate, ,Holly Monger, ,lfw, ,liberty, ,London Fashion Week, ,Naomi Law, ,Osman, ,Osman Yousefzada, ,Satu Fox, ,Somerset House, ,Tim Adey

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011: Paul Costelloe (by Amelia)


Illustration by Artist Andrea

This is my first front row show at London Fashion Week, viagra sale so I’m terribly excited. So far I’ve been stomped on, there pushed and poked in my attempt to view the catwalk, so this good fortune is very much welcomed. A photographer makes his way down the catwalk before the main event starts and snaps the front row. I’m not sure I should be here, but I smile like I own my seat. And as the lights dim, then brilliantly alight once more, my camera is swiftly awakened; lens cap off, switch flicked on, pointing to shoot. Queue the music and it begins.


Illustrations by Fritha Strickland

Monochrome trails the catwalk with authority and chic; a combination of dark strong leather shorts and skirts and light flowing chiffon shirts. Military tailoring softened with fluidity. They’re embellished with a bullet detailing, which, I later learn, is inspired by the Georgian National Ballets costume worn by male ballet dancers. The Georgian National Ballet costumes have also been the source of inspiration for a variety of designers. Did you know that writer Terry Nation’s creation of the Daleks in Doctor Who was inspired by costumes of the Georgian National Ballet too?


The hair compliments the theme. Long Heidi style plaits, careful topknots and intricately braided updos. Clean, neat, confident. And what of the shoes?! I’m tempted to pull a pair of Lako Bukia stunning signature (Mary Jane-esque) heels right off the pretty feet of an unassuming model.

The catwalk changes colour, as the black and whites retreat and the wines, dusky pinks and pearly greys glide in. Colours are good. Colours make me happy. Beautiful swirling chiffon skirts accompanying softly draping silk shirts, then leather trousers and leather skirts and leather shouldered chiffon shirts.


Illustrations by Avril Kelly

On float dreamy wispy dresses. Criss-crossing leather straps add a touch of the urban, reigning in the wearer, back to the city, whilst shoulders of golden coins encourage indulgence and a retreat into the sublime.


Live illustration by Jenny Robins

But it’s the finale that really causes ooohing and aaahing and eyes to widen. A deep blood red dress, its upper half blanketed in golden coins and a skirt that sweeps the floor and ripples as the model moves. It’s obviously the piece the designer is most proud of, as she captures the stage accompanied by her final piece.

More applause and then it’s over and the audience is rushing to get to their next show. A guest sitting in the row behind me is trying to get a hold of something under my seat, so I turn to help her. She jumps back.

“Erm… Can I have your goodie bag,” she asks coyly. Oh my! She had just tried to steal my goodie bag and I had almost let her, I realise. I smile and decline her request. I should probably thank her for alerting me. I’m feeling almost guilty for refusing her now, but hey, this is my first London Fashion Week goody bag and I’m taking it!

All photography by Akeela Bhattay


Illustration by Artist Andrea

This is my first front row show at London Fashion Week, sick so I’m terribly excited. So far I’ve been stomped on, pushed and poked in my attempt to view the catwalk, so this good fortune is very much welcomed. A photographer makes his way down the catwalk before the main event starts and snaps the front row. I’m not sure I should be here, but I smile like I own my seat. And as the lights dim, then brilliantly alight once more, my camera is swiftly awakened; lens cap off, switch flicked on, pointing to shoot. Queue the music and it begins.


Illustrations by Fritha Strickland

Monochrome trails the catwalk with authority and chic; a combination of dark strong leather shorts and skirts and light flowing chiffon shirts. Military tailoring softened with fluidity. They’re embellished with a bullet detailing, which, I later learn, is inspired by the Georgian National Ballets costume worn by male ballet dancers. The Georgian National Ballet costumes have also been the source of inspiration for a variety of designers. Did you know that writer Terry Nation’s creation of the Daleks in Doctor Who was inspired by costumes of the Georgian National Ballet too?


The hair compliments the theme. Long Heidi style plaits, careful topknots and intricately braided updos. Clean, neat, confident. And what of the shoes?! I’m tempted to pull a pair of Lako Bukia stunning signature (Mary Jane-esque) heels right off the pretty feet of an unassuming model.

The catwalk changes colour, as the black and whites retreat and the wines, dusky pinks and pearly greys glide in. Colours are good. Colours make me happy. Beautiful swirling chiffon skirts accompanying softly draping silk shirts, then leather trousers and leather skirts and leather shouldered chiffon shirts.


Illustrations by Avril Kelly

On float dreamy wispy dresses. Criss-crossing leather straps add a touch of the urban, reigning in the wearer, back to the city, whilst shoulders of golden coins encourage indulgence and a retreat into the sublime.


Live illustration by Jenny Robins

But it’s the finale that really causes ooohing and aaahing and eyes to widen. A deep blood red dress, its upper half blanketed in golden coins and a skirt that sweeps the floor and ripples as the model moves. It’s obviously the piece the designer is most proud of, as she captures the stage accompanied by her final piece.

More applause and then it’s over and the audience is rushing to get to their next show. A guest sitting in the row behind me is trying to get a hold of something under my seat, so I turn to help her. She jumps back.

“Erm… Can I have your goodie bag,” she asks coyly. Oh my! She had just tried to steal my goodie bag and I had almost let her, I realise. I smile and decline her request. I should probably thank her for alerting me. I’m feeling almost guilty for refusing her now, but hey, this is my first London Fashion Week goody bag and I’m taking it!

All photography by Akeela Bhattay

See more of Artist Andrea and Jenny Robins’ illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Anja Maklar by Madi

Ones to Watch is always one of my favourite parts of London Fashion Week, more about four fresh designers, drug one after another and always packed to the rafters it’s a really nice way to see contrasting styles. Generally it’s a mixed bag, ambulance read our preview here and last year’s review here. Famous spots in the audience were Susie Bubble and Laura Santamaria.

Anja Maklar

The designer presented a collection of pastels, with cut out and overlap details. In answer to Matt’s pondering in his write up of the designer, she has indeed developed some of the key styles which were seen in her SS11 show, in particular the laser cut detail and the triangle shape of her dresses.

This was a fun, pleasantly pastel, colourful collection with plenty to keep the audience interested.

Kirsty Ward

Kirsty Ward by Anne N’Toko

This is definitely a designer to keep your eye on. Part of a growing crop of young graduates who really bring jewellery into their collections, her AW11 offering was brimming with sparkly adornments and beautiful cut clothes. In particular, the use of cut out panels throughout, was very effective.

A palette with gold, bronze and brown, the autumnal colours were accented with sudden all-in-white outfits and stunning oversized necklaces. A favourite for me was the mesh bronze dress, which caught the light beautifully as the model walked down the catwalk.

Sara Bro Jorgensen

Definitely my favourite collection out of the four, Jorgensen has a hint of Mark Fast and Laura Theiss about her designs but has added an edgier, rocky feel to knitted yarns.

Sara Bro Jorgensen by Maria Papadimitriou

Mostly black, her collection showcased knitted dresses with lots of hanging threads and beads. There were also some highly covetable leggings with shiny black slivers of PVC running down the middle of the leg.

My favourite part of the collection, however, was the cute headgear sported by all the models. Little knitted caps in black and dark blue were worn with nearly every single look.

As well as the black, white knitted cardigans and dresses were worn with grey, splatter print swingy trousers and shorts. The black versus white theme was continued with trompe l’oeil printed dresses complete with tuxedo jacket, waistcoat, shirt and bow tiees.

Tze Gogh

Tze Gogh by Joe Turvey

The last of our Ones to Watch is Tze Gogh who graduated from Parsons in New York and then completed his masters at Central Saint Martins.

Gogh’s collection was understated, with clean simple lines in block colours of midnight blue, husky grey and black. The structured coats, dresses and jackets cleverly retained their shape as the models walked and I would love to know what material he uses, but I couldn’t help feeling that more could have been done to make the collection stand out.

However, I do applaud how he has retained from over designing his clothes and has kept a minimal aesthetic.

Anja Maklar by Madi

Ones to Watch is always one of my favourite parts of London Fashion Week, for sale four fresh designers, view one after another and always packed to the rafters, medications it’s a really nice way to see contrasting styles. Generally it’s a mixed bag, read our preview here and last year’s review here. Famous spots in the audience include infamous blogger Susie Bubble and ethical fashion editor Laura Santamaria. The four young designers were profiled ahead of London Fashion Week by Matt, you can read a bit more about their background, influences and style here.

Anja Maklar

The designer presented a collection of pastels, with cut out and overlap details. In answer to Matt’s pondering in his write up of the designer, she has indeed developed some of the key styles which were seen in her SS11 show, in particular the laser cut detail and the triangle shape of her dresses.

This was a fun, pleasantly pastel, colourful collection with plenty to keep the audience interested.

Kirsty Ward

Kirsty Ward by Anne N’Toko

This is definitely a designer to keep your eye on. Part of a growing crop of young graduates who really bring jewellery into their collections, her AW11 offering was brimming with sparkly adornments and beautiful cut clothes. In particular, the use of cut out panels throughout, was very effective.

A palette with gold, bronze and brown, the autumnal colours were accented with sudden all-in-white outfits and stunning oversized necklaces. A favourite for me was the mesh bronze dress, which caught the light beautifully as the model walked down the catwalk.

Sara Bro Jorgensen

Definitely my favourite collection out of the four, Jorgensen has a hint of Mark Fast and Laura Theiss about her designs but has added an edgier, rocky feel to knitted yarns.

Sara Bro Jorgensen by Maria Papadimitriou

Mostly black, her collection showcased knitted dresses with lots of hanging threads and beads. There were also some highly covetable leggings with shiny black slivers of PVC running down the middle of the leg.

My favourite part of the collection, however, was the cute headgear sported by all the models. Little knitted caps in black and dark blue were worn with nearly every single look.

As well as the black, white knitted cardigans and dresses were worn with grey, splatter print swingy trousers and shorts. The black versus white theme was continued with trompe l’oeil printed dresses complete with tuxedo jacket, waistcoat, shirt and bow tiees.

Tze Gogh

Tze Gogh by Joe Turvey

The last of our Ones to Watch is Tze Gogh who graduated from Parsons in New York and then completed his masters at Central Saint Martins.

Gogh’s collection was understated, with clean simple lines in block colours of midnight blue, husky grey and black. The structured coats, dresses and jackets cleverly retained their shape as the models walked and I would love to know what material he uses, but I couldn’t help feeling that more could have been done to make the collection stand out.

However, I do applaud how he has retained from over designing his clothes and has kept a minimal aesthetic.

Anja Maklar by Madi

Ones to Watch is always one of my favourite parts of London Fashion Week, stuff four fresh designers, discount one after another and always packed to the rafters, sales it’s a really nice way to see contrasting styles. Generally it’s a mixed bag, read our preview here and last year’s review here. Famous spots in the audience include infamous blogger Susie Bubble and ethical fashion editor Laura Santamaria. The four young designers were profiled ahead of London Fashion Week by Matt, you can read a bit more about their background, influences and style here.

Anja Maklar

The designer presented a collection of pastels, with cut out and overlap details. In answer to Matt’s pondering in his write up of the designer, she has indeed developed some of the key styles which were seen in her SS11 show, in particular the laser cut detail and the triangle shape of her dresses.

This was a fun, pleasantly pastel, colourful collection with plenty to keep the audience interested.

Kirsty Ward

Kirsty Ward by Anne N’Toko

This is definitely a designer to keep your eye on. Part of a growing crop of young graduates who really bring jewellery into their collections, her AW11 offering was brimming with sparkly adornments and beautiful cut clothes. In particular, the use of cut out panels throughout, was very effective.

A palette with gold, bronze and brown, the autumnal colours were accented with sudden all-in-white outfits and stunning oversized necklaces. A favourite for me was the mesh bronze dress, which caught the light beautifully as the model walked down the catwalk.

Sara Bro Jorgensen

Definitely my favourite collection out of the four, Jorgensen has a hint of Mark Fast and Laura Theiss about her designs but has added an edgier, rocky feel to knitted yarns.

Sara Bro Jorgensen by Maria Papadimitriou

Mostly black, her collection showcased knitted dresses with lots of hanging threads and beads. There were also some highly covetable leggings with shiny black slivers of PVC running down the middle of the leg.

My favourite part of the collection, however, was the cute headgear sported by all the models. Little knitted caps in black and dark blue were worn with nearly every single look.

As well as the black, white knitted cardigans and dresses were worn with grey, splatter print swingy trousers and shorts. The black versus white theme was continued with trompe l’oeil printed dresses complete with tuxedo jacket, waistcoat, shirt and bow tiees.

Tze Gogh

Tze Gogh by Joe Turvey

The last of our Ones to Watch is Tze Gogh who graduated from Parsons in New York and then completed his masters at Central Saint Martins.

Gogh’s collection was understated, with clean simple lines in block colours of midnight blue, husky grey and black. The structured coats, dresses and jackets cleverly retained their shape as the models walked and I would love to know what material he uses, but I couldn’t help feeling that more could have been done to make the collection stand out.

However, I do applaud how he has retained from over designing his clothes and has kept a minimal aesthetic.

Anja Maklar by Madi

Ones to Watch is always one of my favourite parts of London Fashion Week, viagra sale four fresh designers, one after another and always packed to the rafters, it’s a really nice way to see contrasting styles. Generally it’s a mixed bag, read our preview here and last year’s review here. Famous spots in the audience include infamous blogger Susie Bubble and ethical fashion editor Laura Santamaria. The four young designers were profiled ahead of London Fashion Week by Matt, you can read a bit more about their background, influences and style here.

Anja Maklar

The designer presented a collection of pastels, with cut out and overlap details. In answer to Matt’s pondering in his write up of the designer, she has indeed developed some of the key styles which were seen in her SS11 show, in particular the laser cut detail and the triangle shape of her dresses.

This was a fun, pleasantly pastel, colourful collection with plenty to keep the audience interested.

Kirsty Ward

Kirsty Ward by Anne N’Toko

This is definitely a designer to keep your eye on. Part of a growing crop of young graduates who really bring jewellery into their collections, her AW11 offering was brimming with sparkly adornments and beautiful cut clothes. In particular, the use of cut out panels throughout, was very effective.

A palette with gold, bronze and brown, the autumnal colours were accented with sudden all-in-white outfits and stunning oversized necklaces. A favourite for me was the mesh bronze dress, which caught the light beautifully as the model walked down the catwalk.

Sara Bro Jorgensen

Definitely my favourite collection out of the four, Jorgensen has a hint of Mark Fast and Laura Theiss about her designs but has added an edgier, rocky feel to knitted yarns.

Sara Bro Jorgensen by Maria Papadimitriou

Mostly black, her collection showcased knitted dresses with lots of hanging threads and beads. There were also some highly covetable leggings with shiny black slivers of PVC running down the middle of the leg.

My favourite part of the collection, however, was the cute headgear sported by all the models. Little knitted caps in black and dark blue were worn with nearly every single look.

As well as the black, white knitted cardigans and dresses were worn with grey, splatter print swingy trousers and shorts. The black versus white theme was continued with trompe l’oeil printed dresses complete with tuxedo jacket, waistcoat, shirt and bow tiees.

Tze Gogh

Tze Gogh by Joe Turvey

The last of our Ones to Watch is Tze Gogh who graduated from Parsons in New York and then completed his masters at Central Saint Martins.

Gogh’s collection was understated, with clean simple lines in block colours of midnight blue, husky grey and black. The structured coats, dresses and jackets cleverly retained their shape as the models walked and I would love to know what material he uses, but I couldn’t help feeling that more could have been done to make the collection stand out.

However, I do applaud how he has retained from over designing his clothes and has kept a minimal aesthetic.

Anja Maklar by Madi

Ones to Watch is always one of my favourite parts of London Fashion Week, information pills four fresh designers, one after another and always packed to the rafters, it’s a really nice way to see contrasting styles. Generally it’s a mixed bag, read our preview here and last year’s review here. Famous spots in the audience include infamous blogger Susie Bubble and ethical fashion editor Laura Santamaria. The four young designers were profiled ahead of London Fashion Week by Matt, you can read a bit more about their background, influences and style here.

Anja Maklar

The designer presented a collection of pastels, with cut out and overlap details. In answer to Matt’s pondering in his write up of the designer, she has indeed developed some of the key styles which were seen in her SS11 show, in particular the laser cut detail and the triangle shape of her dresses.

This was a fun, pleasantly pastel, colourful collection with plenty to keep the audience interested.

Kirsty Ward

Kirsty Ward by Anne N’Toko

This is definitely a designer to keep your eye on. Part of a growing crop of young graduates who really bring jewellery into their collections, her AW11 offering was brimming with sparkly adornments and beautiful cut clothes. In particular, the use of cut out panels throughout, was very effective.

A palette with gold, bronze and brown, the autumnal colours were accented with sudden all-in-white outfits and stunning oversized necklaces. A favourite for me was the mesh bronze dress, which caught the light beautifully as the model walked down the catwalk.

Sara Bro Jorgensen

Definitely my favourite collection out of the four, Jorgensen has a hint of Mark Fast and Laura Theiss about her designs but has added an edgier, rocky feel to knitted yarns.

Sara Bro Jorgensen by Maria Papadimitriou

Mostly black, her collection showcased knitted dresses with lots of hanging threads and beads. There were also some highly covetable leggings with shiny black slivers of PVC running down the middle of the leg.

My favourite part of the collection, however, was the cute headgear sported by all the models. Little knitted caps in black and dark blue were worn with nearly every single look.

As well as the black, white knitted cardigans and dresses were worn with grey, splatter print swingy trousers and shorts. The black versus white theme was continued with trompe l’oeil printed dresses complete with tuxedo jacket, waistcoat, shirt and bow tiees.

Tze Gogh

Tze Gogh by Joe Turvey

The last of our Ones to Watch is Tze Gogh who graduated from Parsons in New York and then completed his masters at Central Saint Martins.

Gogh’s collection was understated, with clean simple lines in block colours of midnight blue, husky grey and black. The structured coats, dresses and jackets cleverly retained their shape as the models walked and I would love to know what material he uses, but I couldn’t help feeling that more could have been done to make the collection stand out.

However, I do applaud how he has retained from over designing his clothes and has kept a minimal aesthetic.

Anja Maklar by Madi

Ones to Watch is always one of my favourite parts of London Fashion Week, online four fresh designers, pharmacy one after another and always packed to the rafters, visit this it’s a really nice way to see contrasting styles. Generally it’s a mixed bag, read our preview here and last year’s review here. Famous spots in the audience include infamous blogger Susie Bubble and ethical fashion editor Laura Santamaria. The four young designers were profiled ahead of London Fashion Week by Matt, you can read a bit more about their background, influences and style here.

Anja Maklar

The designer presented a collection of pastels, with cut out and overlap details. In answer to Matt’s pondering in his write up of the designer, she has indeed developed some of the key styles which were seen in her SS11 show, in particular the laser cut detail and the triangle shape of her dresses.

This was a fun, pleasantly pastel, colourful collection with plenty to keep the audience interested.

Kirsty Ward

Kirsty Ward by Anne N’Toko

This is definitely a designer to keep your eye on. Part of a growing crop of young graduates who really bring jewellery into their collections, her AW11 offering was brimming with sparkly adornments and beautiful cut clothes. In particular, the use of cut out panels throughout, was very effective.

A palette with gold, bronze and brown, the autumnal colours were accented with sudden all-in-white outfits and stunning oversized necklaces. A favourite for me was the mesh bronze dress, which caught the light beautifully as the model walked down the catwalk.

Sara Bro Jorgensen

Definitely my favourite collection out of the four, Jorgensen has a hint of Mark Fast and Laura Theiss about her designs but has added an edgier, rocky feel to knitted yarns.

Sara Bro Jorgensen by Maria Papadimitriou

Mostly black, her collection showcased knitted dresses with lots of hanging threads and beads. There were also some highly covetable leggings with shiny black slivers of PVC running down the middle of the leg.

My favourite part of the collection, however, was the cute headgear sported by all the models. Little knitted caps in black and dark blue were worn with nearly every single look.

As well as the black, white knitted cardigans and dresses were worn with grey, splatter print swingy trousers and shorts. The black versus white theme was continued with trompe l’oeil printed dresses complete with tuxedo jacket, waistcoat, shirt and bow tiees.

Tze Gogh

Tze Gogh by Joe Turvey

The last of our Ones to Watch is Tze Gogh who graduated from Parsons in New York and then completed his masters at Central Saint Martins.

Gogh’s collection was understated, with clean simple lines in block colours of midnight blue, husky grey and black. The structured coats, dresses and jackets cleverly retained their shape as the models walked and I would love to know what material he uses, but I couldn’t help feeling that more could have been done to make the collection stand out.

However, I do applaud how he has retained from over designing his clothes and has kept a minimal aesthetic.

Anja Maklar by Madi

Ones to Watch is always one of my favourite parts of London Fashion Week, sildenafil four fresh designers, doctor one after another and always packed to the rafters, dosage it’s a really nice way to see contrasting styles. Generally it’s a mixed bag, read our preview here and last year’s review here. Famous spots in the audience include infamous blogger Susie Bubble and ethical fashion editor Laura Santamaria. The four young designers were profiled ahead of London Fashion Week by Matt, you can read a bit more about their background, influences and style here.

Anja Maklar

The designer presented a collection of pastels, with cut out and overlap details. In answer to Matt’s pondering in his write up of the designer, she has indeed developed some of the key styles which were seen in her SS11 show, in particular the laser cut detail and the triangle shape of her dresses.

This was a fun, pleasantly pastel, colourful collection with plenty to keep the audience interested.

Kirsty Ward

Kirsty Ward by Anne N’Toko

This is definitely a designer to keep your eye on. Part of a growing crop of young graduates who really bring jewellery into their collections, her AW11 offering was brimming with sparkly adornments and beautiful cut clothes. In particular, the use of cut out panels throughout, was very effective.

A palette with gold, bronze and brown, the autumnal colours were accented with sudden all-in-white outfits and stunning oversized necklaces. A favourite for me was the mesh bronze dress, which caught the light beautifully as the model walked down the catwalk.

Sara Bro Jorgensen

Definitely my favourite collection out of the four, Jorgensen has a hint of Mark Fast and Laura Theiss about her designs but has added an edgier, rocky feel to knitted yarns.

Sara Bro Jorgensen by Maria Papadimitriou

Mostly black, her collection showcased knitted dresses with lots of hanging threads and beads. There were also some highly covetable leggings with shiny black slivers of PVC running down the middle of the leg.

My favourite part of the collection, however, was the cute headgear sported by all the models. Little knitted caps in black and dark blue were worn with nearly every single look.

As well as the black, white knitted cardigans and dresses were worn with grey, splatter print swingy trousers and shorts. The black versus white theme was continued with trompe l’oeil printed dresses complete with tuxedo jacket, waistcoat, shirt and bow tiees.

Tze Gogh

Tze Gogh by Joe Turvey

The last of our Ones to Watch is Tze Gogh who graduated from Parsons in New York and then completed his masters at Central Saint Martins.

Gogh’s collection was understated, with clean simple lines in block colours of midnight blue, husky grey and black. The structured coats, dresses and jackets cleverly retained their shape as the models walked and I would love to know what material he uses, but I couldn’t help feeling that more could have been done to make the collection stand out.

However, I do applaud how he has retained from over designing his clothes and has kept a minimal aesthetic.

Paul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Paul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

Those in the business know that I took quite a few years off from attending the shows, check but I’ve been gradually creeping back into LFW and this season Amelia’s Magazine really has been out in force. I’ve attended a record number of catwalk shows and presentations, approved leaving me very little time to actually write or edit photos and commission illustrations. Meanwhile, side effects my wonderful team of contributors have been working their collective butt off. With the result that this is our third blog post about Paul Costelloe… and only my first. And it’s a WEEK since the shows started. Tut tut.

Paul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Antonia ParkerAntonia-Parker-A-W-2011-Paul-Costelloe-A
Paul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker.

Last season Paul really cemented his comeback with a well received opener to S/S LFW – which would explain why this show seemed so much better attended than the last… good words can spread like wildfire in fashion land. This season he did it again, despite rumours swirling around on the day that the label went into receivership recently – a quick google search revealing that a new backer in the form of Calvelex was unveiled on the same day of his A/W show. This time it was not his sons but his towering opera singing flame-haired daughter that Paul sent down the catwalk. Does he have anymore offspring squirrelled around somewhere? If not, who the hell will do the familial duty next season?

Paul Costelloe A-W 2011-daughter Jessica
Paul’s daughter Jessica opened the show. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Once Amazonian daughter Jessica had left centre stage with a cocky little smile it was down to business as four pink pyramid-haired ladies strode onto the catwalk en masse, resplendent in emerald and fern green boucle tweed and textured metallic silks swinging coat dresses.

Paul Costelloe A/W 2011 by jenny robins
Paul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Jenny Robins.

Paul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Karla Pérez Manrique
Paul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Karla Pérez Manrique.

The collection swiftly moved through a spectrum of mustards, oranges and red checks on big collared dresses, boxy crop jackets and mini skater skirts, interspersed by the odd splash of luxurious menswear – my favourite being a sumptuous deep red velvet jacket. Swing shapes, splashy flower prints, cowl necks and big collars were the order of the day. Extremely delish, and very more-ish.

Paul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryPaul Costelloe A/W 2011 by Amelia Gregory

Paul Costelloe A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.LFW A-W 2011-Paul Costelloe family
I managed to sneak a quick photo of Paul Costelloe as he was leaving Somerset House with his massive brood; Paul resplendent in a pair of sparkling new white pumps.

Read Matt Bramford’s review of the show here, and Jemma Crow’s review here. You can see more of Antonia Parker and Jenny Robins’ illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amazonian, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Antonia Parker, ,Calvelex, ,Ellie Sutton, ,Flower prints, ,Jemma Crow, ,Jenny Robins, ,Karla Pérez Manrique, ,Matt Bramford, ,Paul Costelloe, ,Velvet

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Jayne Pierson

Jaeger A/W 2011 by Joana Faria
Jaeger, information pills I’m afraid, diagnosis is one of those shows for which I lost the press release several weeks ago. But who needs a blurb anyway? Surely the clothes should be able to do the talking…

Jaeger, information pills a traditional fashion brand that has managed to up the fashion style stakes with in house design team shake ups. The current creative director is Stuart Stockdale, who formerly worked for Pringle of Scotland amongst others. He’s been with Jaeger for several years now, and has succeeded in reinvigorating the brand. What is it with British heritage fashion brands? They’re just so very good at reinventing themselves.

It was under the clean lights of the BFC tent that Jaeger hit the catwalk, itself all clean lines and considered tailoring. Sharp, beautifully crisp well fitting garments ploughed out to meet the photographers. I think this is what’s known as an autumnal colour range. Blocks of cinnamon, caramel, fallen leaf orange, paprika, mustard and moss gathered around punctual navy blues and sensible chocolate brown. Capacious leather bags swung or handheld clutches were the accessory of choice and the shoes were simply divine, cleverly styled with stripy woollen socks. Present and correct was the colour du jour – sharp bursts of orange red. Or on dazzling silky blouses a lip-smacking deep fuchsia pink. Yum.

This is what I would wear if I were a different kind of person: one who always looks immaculately turned out, whatever the occasion. And of course one who has a very nice steady stream of income. Working women in a certain type of job would do well to look to Jaeger for fabulous style and quality.
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Madi
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Madi.

Jaeger, viagra I’m afraid, sales is one of those shows for which I lost the press release several weeks ago. But who needs a blurb anyway? Surely the clothes should be able to do the talking…

Jaeger, a traditional fashion brand that has managed to up the fashion style stakes with in house design team shake ups. The current creative director is Stuart Stockdale, who formerly worked for Pringle of Scotland amongst others. He’s been with Jaeger for several years now, and has succeeded in reinvigorating the brand. What is it with British heritage fashion brands? They’re just so very good at reinventing themselves.

Jaeger A/W 2011 by Joana FariaJaeger A/W 2011 by Joana Faria
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Joana Faria.

It was under the clean lights of the BFC tent that Jaeger hit the catwalk, itself all clean lines and considered tailoring. Sharp, beautifully crisp well fitting garments ploughed out to meet the photographers. I think this is what’s known as an autumnal colour range. Blocks of cinnamon, caramel, fallen leaf orange, paprika, mustard and moss gathered around punctual navy blues and sensible chocolate brown. Capacious leather bags swung or handheld clutches were the accessory of choice and the shoes were simply divine, cleverly styled with stripy woollen socks. Present and correct was the colour du jour – sharp bursts of orange red. Or on dazzling silky blouses a lip-smacking deep fuchsia pink. Yum.

This is what I would wear if I were a different kind of person: one who always looks immaculately turned out, whatever the occasion. And of course one who has a very nice steady stream of income. Working women in a certain type of job would do well to look to Jaeger for fabulous style and quality.
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Madi
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Madi.

Jaeger, cure I’m afraid, about it is one of those shows for which I lost the press release several weeks ago. But who needs a blurb anyway? Surely the clothes should be able to do the talking…

Jaeger, a traditional fashion brand that has managed to up the fashion style stakes with in house design team shake ups. The current creative director is Stuart Stockdale, who formerly worked for Pringle of Scotland amongst others. He’s been with Jaeger for several years now, and has succeeded in reinvigorating the brand. What is it with British heritage fashion brands? They’re just so very good at reinventing themselves.

Jaeger A/W 2011 by Joana FariaJaeger A/W 2011 by Joana Faria
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Joana Faria.

It was under the clean lights of the BFC tent that Jaeger hit the catwalk, itself all clean lines and considered tailoring. Sharp, beautifully crisp well fitting garments ploughed out to meet the photographers. I think this is what’s known as an autumnal colour range. Blocks of cinnamon, caramel, fallen leaf orange, paprika, mustard and moss gathered around punctual navy blues and sensible chocolate brown. Capacious leather bags swung or handheld clutches were the accessory of choice and the shoes were simply divine, cleverly styled with stripy woollen socks. Present and correct was the colour du jour – sharp bursts of orange red. Or on dazzling silky blouses a lip-smacking deep fuchsia pink. Yum.

This is what I would wear if I were a different kind of person: one who always looks immaculately turned out, whatever the occasion. And of course one who has a very nice steady stream of income. Working women in a certain type of job would do well to look to Jaeger for fabulous style and quality.
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Madi
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Madi.

Jaeger, shop I’m afraid, medications is one of those shows for which I lost the press release several weeks ago. But who needs a blurb anyway? Surely the clothes should be able to do the talking…

Jaeger is a traditional brand that has managed to up the fashion style stakes with in house design team shake ups. The current creative director is Stuart Stockdale, who formerly worked for Pringle of Scotland amongst others. He’s been with Jaeger for several years now and after a prolonged period in the doldrums he has succeeded in reinvigorating the brand. What is it with British heritage fashion brands? They’re just so very good at reinventing themselves.

Jaeger A/W 2011 by Joana FariaJaeger A/W 2011 by Joana Faria
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Joana Faria.

It was under the clean lights of the BFC tent that Jaeger hit the catwalk, itself all clean lines and considered tailoring. Sharp, beautifully crisp well fitting garments ploughed out to meet the photographers. The collection was a delicious mix of autumnal colours: blocks of cinnamon, caramel, fallen leaf orange, paprika, mustard and moss gathering around punctual navy blues and sensible chocolate brown. Capacious leather bags swung or handheld clutches were the accessory of choice and the shoes were simply divine, cleverly styled with stripy woollen socks. Present and correct was the colour du jour – sharp bursts of orange red. Or on dazzling silky blouses a lip-smacking deep fuchsia pink. Yum.

This is what I would wear if I were a different kind of person: one who always looks immaculately turned out, whatever the occasion. And of course one who has a very nice steady stream of income. Working women in a certain type of job would do well to look to Jaeger for fabulous style and quality that won’t go out of fashion in a hurry.
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

For Jayne Pierson I raced into town alone – yet another early morning show for which we only had one ticket, cheap enticingly printed on pearly grey paper. This despite a very nice mention of our support in the accompanying press release – thankyou whoever thought to mention us, approved it’s appreciated! We did in fact catch up with Jayne just prior to her show, and you can read the interview here. The invite and goodie bag were not, however, an indicator of a colourful show but rather the favoured shade of make-up. Kingdom of Shadows began on a black note and carried on in the same vein, broken up only by a curious grey and beige striped taffeta that is something of a Pierson signature but would not have looked out of place on curtains or a sofa in a certain type of house.

Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme
Jayne Pierson’s Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme.

Jayne Pierson formerly worked in the music business and this show felt deeply imbued with the remnants of an 80s rock sensibility. A gothic Victorian kind of rock, with swaggering shoulders and bunched bustle skirts. The models sported messy up dos, pallid faces with lilac lips and pin sharp shapely heels. Black tailored jackets featured inset patent fabric shoulders and cuffs, leather minidresses cowl-necked atop rubberised leggings. The sudden introduction of striped silk was balanced with patent detailing on collar, waist and cuffs – a jaunty pillbox hat set askance.

Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson by Laura Mullins
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Laura Mullins.

Devore lacy velvet also made an appearance, not to mention a terribly racy see through crop top and leggings. I particularly liked the large but lightly draped silver jewellery by Fiona Paxton, who fuses Indian artisanship with a British punk sensibility and Bauhaus design. A corseted jumpsuit that hit the catwalk in a tipsy fashion was less desirable: the poor dresser must have got a shafting but I blame the model’s lack of boobs. What’s the point of a shaped bodice if there’s nothing to put in it?

Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Jayne took her bow on the catwalk accompanied by a celebrity model – which no one knew. I had to check in with the PR to find out who she was but I can’t for the life of me remember – apparently she was a Welsh singer.

Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia GregoryJayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 Kingdom of Shadows. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

There were some beautiful ideas in Kingdom of Shadows; especially the strong shoulders and nipped in waists that recalled my fondest decade, the 80s. And I adored the carefully constructed bustle dress that bore the influence of Jayne’s time with Vivienne Westwood. But yet again there was all that pesky black, which will never ever be my favourite fashion colour. Here’s hoping that next season might see the reintroduction of colour again. Go on Jayne, please!

Categories ,80s, ,bauhaus, ,Ellie Sutton, ,Fiona Paxton, ,gothic, ,Indian, ,Jayne Pierson, ,Kerri-Ann Hulme, ,Kingdom of Shadows, ,Laura Mullins, ,onoff, ,punk, ,Victorian, ,Vivienne Westwood

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