Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Lako Bukia

Lako Bukia - London Fashion Week S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Being ushered past the growing queues for Lakio Bukia and presented with the offer to take a seat, approved I’m suddenly transported back to one of my very first catwalk shows and my very first front row experience at London Fashion Week earlier this year. Lako Bukia’s A/W 2011 collection captivated me with its rich use of colour, price flattering fabrics and innovative design and I had thoroughly enjoyed the show (read my review of the Lako Bukia A/W 2011 CHOXA collection) so I was excited to see the designer’s presentation of her S/S 2012 collection.

Crowd at Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Photography by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Hannah Hope

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Hannah Hope

I’ve read Lako Bukia’s S/S 2012 Preview Interview with Amelia’s Magazine, help so I have an inkling of what to expect, but that hasn’t diluted my interest at all; in fact I’m further intrigued, and eager for the show to commence. The auditorium is filling up rapidly and I observe the melting pot of characters gathered at the Fashion Scout venue. A group of splendidly preened and styled front-row fashionistas chat animatedly from across the room, willing for someone to take their picture. So I do, as one does.

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

The dimming of the lights signals the start of the show and the now crowded arena settles into silence inviting the first model to glide on to the runway. The Lako Bukia ethos promises to create beautiful clothing for all women and I champion Lako’s commitment to continue the upholding of that code. The unrestrictive blouses and sweeping skirts hold the potential to flatter all body shapes.

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Photography by Amelia Gregory

The contentious subject of the sexualisation of femininity is something Lako Bukia isn’t afraid to challenge and I love that about her. Lako attempts to change the attitudes of men and women alike, regarding the two seemingly inextricably entwined identities that are synonymous with figure-hugging and revealing clothing. With her designs, Lako Bukia effectively demonstrates that women can look and feel feminine and sexy in garments that do not simply focus on body shape. In Lako Bukia‘s interview with Amelia, she says ‘the women of the world have forgotten that there is something more exciting in the mystery of garments that do not stress ones body shape’ and I’m inclined to agree.

Lako-Bukia - LFW (SS-2012) by-Barb-Royal

Lako-Bukia - LFW SS-2012 by-Barb-Royal

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Barb Royal.

For her spring/summer collection, Lako Bukia has chosen a palette of bold, contrasting colours that reflect her often, kaleidoscopic personality; black, red, white and shades of grey paint the pieces for this season’s crop. The black and white eye make-up adheres to the theme as do the neat and up-do hairstyles.

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Photography by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 LFW by Hannah Hope

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Hannah Hope

It’s the first time Lako Bukia is using print and her hand painted Asian inspired flowers and trees shroud the billowing chiffon and silk pieces. The Asian inspiration is further exposed in the mandarin collars adorning many of the blouses and dresses. My favourite detail is the neat row of tiny fabric covered buttons, reminiscent of the 1930s, placed on a variety of positions, most notably on the structured bodices and on the seams of the Jodhpur like trousers. The gathered waistline is also a trending theme in the collection.

Lako Bukia - London Fashion Week S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

The catwalk is performed in a unique fashion, which is fantastic for those sitting closer to the end of the runway, but as I’m not, getting a decent photo is a lot to ask for. I do hope the choreography for next year’s shows revert back to a simpler style (or I learn to position myself more strategically).

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Photography by Amelia Gregory

The talented designer has decidedly stated that her new collection will be one that is wearable and saleable and with the beautiful garments swishing past me on the catwalk, I undoubtedly recognise this to be true. The commercial element of fashion has obviously penetrated the creative process, but Lako Bukia’s unique branding has not been diminished. However, I do hope too see a spark of the former eccentricity of the brand in future designs.

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Photography by Akeela Bhattay

As the show comes to an end the sweet Georgian designer takes to the catwalk, to be applauded enthusiastically by her audience.

Watch the show here.

Lako Bukia SS12 Full Show from VAUXHALL FASHION SCOUT on Vimeo.

Categories ,Akeela Bhattay, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Article, ,Asian, ,Barb Royal, ,black, ,Blog Post, ,Central Saint Martins, ,CHOXA, ,Dramatic, ,Fashion Scout, ,Felicities PR, ,Femininity, ,Flowers, ,georgia, ,Grey, ,Hand Painted, ,Hannah Hope, ,Images, ,japanese, ,Joana Faria, ,lako bukia, ,London College of Fashion, ,London Fashion Week, ,Photos, ,print, ,Red, ,review, ,S/S 2012, ,sexuality, ,Silk, ,trees, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,White

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Lako Bukia

Lako Bukia - London Fashion Week S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Being ushered past the growing queues for Lakio Bukia and presented with the offer to take a seat, approved I’m suddenly transported back to one of my very first catwalk shows and my very first front row experience at London Fashion Week earlier this year. Lako Bukia’s A/W 2011 collection captivated me with its rich use of colour, price flattering fabrics and innovative design and I had thoroughly enjoyed the show (read my review of the Lako Bukia A/W 2011 CHOXA collection) so I was excited to see the designer’s presentation of her S/S 2012 collection.

Crowd at Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Photography by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Hannah Hope

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Hannah Hope

I’ve read Lako Bukia’s S/S 2012 Preview Interview with Amelia’s Magazine, help so I have an inkling of what to expect, but that hasn’t diluted my interest at all; in fact I’m further intrigued, and eager for the show to commence. The auditorium is filling up rapidly and I observe the melting pot of characters gathered at the Fashion Scout venue. A group of splendidly preened and styled front-row fashionistas chat animatedly from across the room, willing for someone to take their picture. So I do, as one does.

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

The dimming of the lights signals the start of the show and the now crowded arena settles into silence inviting the first model to glide on to the runway. The Lako Bukia ethos promises to create beautiful clothing for all women and I champion Lako’s commitment to continue the upholding of that code. The unrestrictive blouses and sweeping skirts hold the potential to flatter all body shapes.

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Photography by Amelia Gregory

The contentious subject of the sexualisation of femininity is something Lako Bukia isn’t afraid to challenge and I love that about her. Lako attempts to change the attitudes of men and women alike, regarding the two seemingly inextricably entwined identities that are synonymous with figure-hugging and revealing clothing. With her designs, Lako Bukia effectively demonstrates that women can look and feel feminine and sexy in garments that do not simply focus on body shape. In Lako Bukia‘s interview with Amelia, she says ‘the women of the world have forgotten that there is something more exciting in the mystery of garments that do not stress ones body shape’ and I’m inclined to agree.

Lako-Bukia - LFW (SS-2012) by-Barb-Royal

Lako-Bukia - LFW SS-2012 by-Barb-Royal

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Barb Royal.

For her spring/summer collection, Lako Bukia has chosen a palette of bold, contrasting colours that reflect her often, kaleidoscopic personality; black, red, white and shades of grey paint the pieces for this season’s crop. The black and white eye make-up adheres to the theme as do the neat and up-do hairstyles.

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Photography by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 LFW by Hannah Hope

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Hannah Hope

It’s the first time Lako Bukia is using print and her hand painted Asian inspired flowers and trees shroud the billowing chiffon and silk pieces. The Asian inspiration is further exposed in the mandarin collars adorning many of the blouses and dresses. My favourite detail is the neat row of tiny fabric covered buttons, reminiscent of the 1930s, placed on a variety of positions, most notably on the structured bodices and on the seams of the Jodhpur like trousers. The gathered waistline is also a trending theme in the collection.

Lako Bukia - London Fashion Week S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

The catwalk is performed in a unique fashion, which is fantastic for those sitting closer to the end of the runway, but as I’m not, getting a decent photo is a lot to ask for. I do hope the choreography for next year’s shows revert back to a simpler style (or I learn to position myself more strategically).

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Photography by Amelia Gregory

The talented designer has decidedly stated that her new collection will be one that is wearable and saleable and with the beautiful garments swishing past me on the catwalk, I undoubtedly recognise this to be true. The commercial element of fashion has obviously penetrated the creative process, but Lako Bukia’s unique branding has not been diminished. However, I do hope too see a spark of the former eccentricity of the brand in future designs.

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Photography by Akeela Bhattay

As the show comes to an end the sweet Georgian designer takes to the catwalk, to be applauded enthusiastically by her audience.

Watch the show here.

Lako Bukia SS12 Full Show from VAUXHALL FASHION SCOUT on Vimeo.

Categories ,Akeela Bhattay, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Article, ,Asian, ,Barb Royal, ,black, ,Blog Post, ,Central Saint Martins, ,CHOXA, ,Dramatic, ,Fashion Scout, ,Felicities PR, ,Femininity, ,Flowers, ,georgia, ,Grey, ,Hand Painted, ,Hannah Hope, ,Images, ,japanese, ,Joana Faria, ,lako bukia, ,London College of Fashion, ,London Fashion Week, ,Photos, ,print, ,Red, ,review, ,S/S 2012, ,sexuality, ,Silk, ,trees, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,White

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Amelia’s Magazine | Lako Bukia: The London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Preview Interview

Lako Bukia by Natasha Nicole
Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Natasha Nicole Waddon.

In the second of my London Fashion Week previews meet Georgian designer Lako Bukia, and who wowed us with her distinctive style last season. Choxa was inspired by the Georgian National Ballet and featured plenty of military flourishes juxtaposed with feminine flowing chiffon, approved but what can we expect for S/S 2012? Lako Bukia talks about why her homeland is so close to her heart, viagra and why it’s so important to create clothes that suit all women.

Lako Bukia Choxa
Lako Bukia Choxa
You can see more of Choxa on my review blog.

lako-bukia-by-jessica-knight
Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Jessica Knight.

You hail from Georgia, which seems to produce a lot of world class designers, for example Tata-Naka. Why do you think that is?
I don’t know, but when I was little I used to hear a lot about Georgians being very talented. Georgia is a really small country but it has a very ancient history so that makes it special. I am happy to hear that you think there so many talented people who are now representing the country abroad.

Lako Bukia by Claire Kearns
Lako Bukia by Claire Kearns.

What do you miss most about your home town?
I miss all the traditions we have that gather together friends and family every day. In London you don’t get a chance to be with your friends every day and it’s harder to get help. In Georgia everyone is ready to be there for you.

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester
Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester.

You are highly educated, with several degrees and other qualifications in fashion design: how have the different places that you’ve studied affected your approach to fashion?
Different colleges and universities have given me different things so from each of them I have learned something special. Attending different colleges helped me to pick up on the most important things and put them together in my mind. In Georgia at the Tbilisi State Academy of Arts I learnt about colours, paintings and fine art, Central Saint Martins was more about developing creative ideas, Istituto Marangoni in Italy was good for learning about business and marketing and finally at LCF there was a good combination of everything and I also learnt good technical skills.

Lako Bukia Flower Skirt by Sam Parr
Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Sam Parr.

You make clothes to flatter every woman, how do you ensure that is the case?
Construction and fabric are the most important thing. Different cuts must be used with different fabrics or you risk ruining everything. Every time I design something I have a particular fabric in mind and I will travel all over until I have found it because if I use something else it could change everything. I use lots of silk and chiffon fabrics, because with these it is possible to create very flattering styles and this is important to the Lako Bukia aesthetic.

Lako Bukia by Natasha Nicole Waddon
Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Natasha Nicole Waddon.

The new collection is inspired by Asian trees and flowers. Where did you turn to for your inspiration for S/S 2012, and why were you attracted to them?
I have always been attracted to Asian culture: my favourite writer is Japanese and the designers that I adored from childhood are Japanese too, so it was one of the things I really wanted to work on. Luckily I traveled to China and Hong Kong this March and was amazed at the architecture and beautiful gardens full of pretty flowers and trees.

Lako Bukia print design
You have introduced print for the first time this season, why did you decide to do this and what has the learning curve been like?
Every season I try to do something new, so it is always a learning process. I love exploring new things and I am not afraid of the challenge. I think if a designer wants to grow and learn more, then they should do something new or more difficult every season. I have always been fond of fine art and I used to paint a lot, so I wanted to make use of this in my clothes. So I decided to draw and print on the fabric.

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester
Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester.

Why are you so interested in contrast? You favour quite a dramatic colour palette – is this a reflection of your personality?
I can be very depressed and I often see more of the negative in life than the positive, but my friends and family would never believe this because I don’t show this side to them. I guess that is why my colour palette is more dramatic: because of my personality. If you are not strong in this industry (and in life in general) then you will not survive, so I need to be strong, and my experiences have made me stronger.

Lako Bukia Shoes by Sam Parr
Lako Bukia Shoes by Sam Parr.

It’s important to you to appeal to a wide market, offering commercial pieces amongst showpieces – how do you balance your offerings so that they are attractive on all levels, and what kind of commercial pieces have you introduced this season?
If you look at my collections from the beginning then you will see that they have changed a lot. At the start I thought fashion was all about being creative and making art. My first collection Mushroom was completely unwearable, with hand made fabrics and very big sleeves. Step by step I have learned that being a designer is not just making something very extraordinary but it is also about doing business and making something new, different and wearable. I always try to have a few showpieces for press amongst more commercial garments but this season almost everything will appeal to buyers: printed fabric chiffon shirts, dresses, trousers, small shorts and corsets.

Lako Bukia Mushroom
Lako Bukia’s graduate collection Mushroom.

What can we expect from Lako Bukia in the coming years? 
I will always try to be more creative and make more interesting clothes. I never want to lose my style as I try to climb to the top. My aim is to redefine the way the world sees femininity and sexuality. Due to a decade long pressure from the fashion world and show business representatives, femininity and sexuality are now widely perceived as being equal to wearing tight and revealing clothes. The women of the world have forgotten that there is something more exciting in the mystery of garments that do not stress ones body shape.

Lako Bukia takes to the catwalk on Saturday 17th September 2011 as part of Fashion Scout.

Categories ,Asian, ,Central Saint Martins, ,CHOXA, ,Claire Kearns, ,Dramatic, ,Fashion Scout, ,Femininity, ,Flowers, ,georgia, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Istituto Marangoni, ,japanese, ,Jessica Knight, ,lako bukia, ,London College of Fashion, ,London Fashion Week, ,Mushroom, ,Natasha Nicole Waddon, ,preview, ,print, ,S/S 2012, ,Sam Parr, ,sexuality, ,Silk, ,Tata Naka, ,Tbilisi State Academy of Arts, ,trees

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Amelia’s Magazine | An interview with The Miserable Rich about their spooky new album Miss You In The Days

The Miserable Rich by Kathryn Corlett
The Miserable Rich by Kathryn Corlett.

Miss You in the Days is the new album from The Miserable Rich, a fabulous collection of songs inspired by ghosts, ghouls… and possession. In other words, the perfect musical accompaniment for Halloween and beyond. I got in touch with lead singer James De Malplaquet to find out what inspired this theatrical tour de force.

The Miserable Rich bed
Why do you think your music is referred to as Chamber Pop and is there anything else you would prefer to be called or that you use to describe yourselves better?
It would seem a little churlish to deny that there are both pop and chamber music elements to our music – but the term ‘chamber pop’ is just one consonant away from ‘chamber pot’ – a little too close for comfort in my humble…. We certainly use some traditional chamber music instruments – violin, cello, double bass, that kind of thing. I’m told the idea of chamber music was that it went against the tyranny of the orchestral hall – it was music that could be played anywhere, in any room, or chamber. We certainly fit in with that, having played in all kinds of places from churches to parks, palaces to (I ‘kid’ you not) creches.

Taking the songs Pisshead, Hungover and Chestnut Sunday (about cocaine addiction), and our propensity for liquor, we started off calling it ‘bar-room chamber music’ – but that didn’t really fit with the song for my mother (I hope). We do think there’s a bit of intensity in the music and the lyrical subject matter though – a bit of fire in the belly – and so we’re toying with ‘fiery chamber music for (song) lovers’ at the mo. There’ll probably be a new one in a month or two, mind.

Miss You In The Days cover
Who inspires you musically – I think there’s a definite jaunt to your music that calls to mind the theatrical big band festival scene. Has this been a factor in your development?
I think you’re right; there is indeed a certain theatrical flourish to what we do. Not that we planned it – and apart from my soft spot for Kate Bush, Grace Jones and Peter Gabriel, it’s not really there in the bands that we like – Will loves Loney Dear, for example – hardly known for his overblown music or stage shows….. I don’t know – I guess it just sort of came out that way. I do remember talking to the band before some of our first shows and agreeing that it didn’t matter if we hit a few bum notes, as long as we put emotion into the playing. It’s probably ramping the emotion up that gives it this element of theatre. We might play one or two less bum notes nowadays (we might not), but we still try to maintain that level of intensity.On the other hand, it might just be because we’re an incorrigible bunch of drama queens, completely divorced from reality. Sounds much more fun that way.

The Miserable Rich by Beth Crowley
The Miserable Rich by Beth Crowley.

How big is the current incarnation of your band – and who plays all the different instruments?
We’ve always been a five piece, with Will Calderbank on cello and occasional piano, Mike Siddell on violin and Rhys Lovell on double bass. This is the first time Ricky Pritchard has joined us on guitar and piano, and we added a drummer (!) this time round. Last album, we made a rule that we all had to play at least two instruments and sing on the album, so we shared the drumming, but on this album we got a real live drummer – David ‘Badlace’ Schechtriemen – to pitch in and help out. Myself, I used to play bits of piano, guitar, percussion and mandolin on the records, but they’ve gradually wrestled all the toys off me and made it clear I should just stick to singing….. Spoil sports.

Your album Miss You in the Days is described as “a collection of witty mischievous ghost stories” and is being released on Halloween. Have you always been fans of the otherworldly and the paranormal, and how or why did this love come about?
It was just one of those •spooky• coincidences, really. If we were going to record another album, I wanted us to go away and have an adventure – and so I came up with this idea of going to a haunted house and writing an album based on ghost stories. I’d noticed that we English – myself in particular – found it difficult to write about sex and death, and I thought this might be a good way of exorcising those particular lyrical demons. After I’d sold the idea to the band, I started reading only ghost stores and went around on tours in the UK and Europe, telling anyone who’d listen our plan, hoping someone would say ‘Come record at my house – it’s haunted as hell‘. In the end, a friend who had offered her haunted attic suddenly ‘remembered’ she was living next to Britain’s most haunted stately home, the Jacobean Palace of Blickling Hall – birthplace of Anne Boleyn. Introductions were sought, deals were cut with the National Trust, and off we went, hope in our hearts and ghouls in our heads.

Two rough diamonds from The Miserable Rich by Rhiannon Ladd
Two rough diamonds from The Miserable Rich by Rhiannon Ladd.

You recorded parts of the album in the haunted Blickling Hall – any good stories from this period? Mysterious creaks, ghost sightings – or were the stories of the place enough to work on your imaginations? 
Blickling is an amazing place, incredibly beautiful and evocative. Visiting its lonely windswept and tree-lined roads on our first visit, seeing the palace loom out of the darkness, it was easy to imagine people losing their wits in the deep dark Winters. Perhaps we did ourselves. David said he saw faces at the window on more than one occasion, the mics kept picking up German voices, and though the caretaker once told us in thick Glaswegian tones ‘The only spirits you’ll find here are whiskey, vodka and gin‘, Ricky and our manager Howard will tell you something very different about the unexplained voice they recorded late one Friday night in the West Turret Bedroom…….

Anything’s Possible

TheMiserableRich_AnythingsPossible_1000
Anything’s Possible cover art by illustrator Stanley Chow.


How does the erotic element of the album present itself, and which songs is this felt in the most?
I had been thinking about how the word ‘possession’ is both a supernatural and a sexual term. We hope to possess or be possessed by our lovers, or by the act of lovemaking. I’d also been mulling a little playfully on the meaning of words like ‘moaning’ and ‘groaning’. If you hear someone moaning in an old, empty house, say, you might draw very different conclusions to those you might on hearing the same sound through a hotel room wall. These ideas, and the idea of ‘love across beyond the grave‘ are suggested in the songs Laid Up In Lavender, On A Certain Night, Honesty and True Love – but I hope it’s not too heavy-handed.

YouTube Preview Image

What is going on in On a Certain Night? The lyrics sound quite stalkerish… who or what inspired this tune, and whose house was the lucky venue for the video? 
My first love was possessed. Many may believe this of their own experience, but in my case, these were her own words. She told me that a bright shiny light would enter the room, enter her body (as I hoped to do myself, but in quite a different way), and tell her what to do. I wasn’t sure if I believed her, or if I thought it a brilliant and elaborate method of getting out of responsibility for one’s actions…. When we started writing the album, many years later, I remembered the story and thought I’d write a slightly disturbing pop song from the perspective of this possessing spirit. There may be a little revenge in this – he is quite a lascivious devil, isn’t he? As for the video, it was all shot in one night, after hours in our new favourite Brighton pub, The Chequer Inn, run by a lovely and accommodating couple who had come up to me in various other pubs and told me they loved the band, and once memorably giving me a packet of twiglets.

On a certain night cover
Some pretty nightmarish make up featured in the video too. Do you have any special plans for this Halloween and what will you be dressing up as?
Hideous, isn’t it? That’s what happens if I don’t have time to properly put my face on before going out……. At least it ensures the video doesn’t look like Losing My Religion…. Yes, there will indeed be a bit of dressing up – and for this tour we’ll be playing in some churches, crypts, castles and even palaces, so anyone who gets into the ‘spirit’ of the nights will get a special ‘ghost hour’ radio mix I’ve made. I think we’re going to be imprinting a lot of memories on this tour….

YouTube Preview ImageHungover

The new single On A Certain Night is out on 24th October and the album Miss You in the Days is out, fittingly, on 31st October. Both on Humble Soul. Not to be missed. Check out The Miserable Rich soon! There are a few free tracks to download on Facebook here.

Categories ,album, ,Anything’s Possible, ,Beth Crowley, ,brighton, ,Chamber Pop, ,David ‘Badlace’ Schechtriemen, ,Dramatic, ,gothic, ,Hallowe’en, ,Humble Soul, ,Hungover, ,interview, ,James De Malplaquet, ,Kathryn Corlett, ,Mike Siddell, ,Possession, ,pub, ,review, ,Rhiannon Ladd, ,Rhys Lovell, ,Spooky, ,Stanley Chow, ,The Chequer Inn, ,The Chequers, ,The Miserable Rich, ,Theatrical, ,Will Calderbank

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