Amelia’s Magazine | Latitude Festival 2010: Waterfront Graduate Fashion Shows Preview

A while back I happened to catch a performance by Lissie at the Old Queens Head in Angel. I hadn’t planned on watching her – truth be told, more about healing I was there to check out the band before her ; but my curiosity was piqued as I watched the room fill up with an expectant and excited audience, rx all craning their necks and standing on their tippy toes to get a better view of the girl serenading us. It’s been a while since I saw someone so captivating. Golden haired, this site freckled and just a slip of a thing, Lissie entranced the room who in turn treated her to a hushed and reverential silence, punctuated only by bursts of spirited applause and cheers. I watched the audience watching her. Everyone seemed transported out of their location; away from the top room of a pub on grimy old Essex Road and into the world that Mid-Western native come Californian girl Lissie inhabits, laced with the scent of orange blossom, filled with wide open skies, winding rivers and smokey mountains, and night-times spent on porches with nothing but a guitar, a couple of beers and a pack of Marlboro Reds . No wonder we were all captivated.

A couple of weeks later, I got to meet the busy Lissie. In the time between, Lissie had appeared on Jools Holland, toured around Europe, duetted with Ellie Goulding at The Great Escape, and graced the airwaves, all in the name of the hectic promotion of her debut album, Catching a Tiger (hot on the heels of the release of last years Why You Runnin’ EP). The phrase ‘riding a juggernaut’ comes to mind with Lissie; bursting into our consciousness with the brightest of starts. The day we met was a rare moment of down time; her touring schedule is in a constant state of flux – stretching to accommodate gigs that are being added on a daily basis, and Lissie had only just made it back from the previous nights gigs in Manchester and Newcastle. Curled up wearing her newest acquisition – a red jacket with white piping brought from a charity shop up North which made her look, she remarked cheerily, like “Santa Claus”, she lamented the ever decreasing amount of free time but was laughingly quick to note that it’s “a quality problem- it’s only busy because it’s going well, if no-one liked the music then there wouldn’t be things for me to do!” As Amelia’s Magazine is nothing if not versatile in its roles, I was happy to take on the guise of English Tourist Board representative, and suggest a list of places to visit when she finally gets a day off; though when that day will be, we will never know! ( FYI, Lissie was especially keen on the visit to Hampton Court Palace idea). As she munched on a healthy beetroot salad – my lunch advice was a visit to Mr Jerk in Soho for some fattening salt fish patties; probably best that not all of my suggestions get listened to) – I decided to find out just where this spirited… got her start in life.

I always loved to sing, I was a pretty outspoken, strong willed little kid! I got a little shyer and more introverted when I got older but as a kid I used to stomp my feet when I walked (swings arms in a very determined manner), I was always talkin’… My family were really sweet and encouraging, but at school I would get into a lot of trouble because I would talk back, I always knew what was best for me, and when other people used to tell me what was best for me, I would be like “uh oh! Not gonna do it!” (laughs) I loved to sing, so becoming a songwriter was a great way for me to express my feelings, you know. I wasn’t always great at talking about things, and so I could write these little melodies…. even as a little kid, I would sing my feelings. I sang to my sister; I do recall tape recording this mean song about her, and leaving a tape recorder about her under her bedroom door and then pressing play and running away! (laughs) And then in high school I went through my phase of being more introverted – I pierced my nose, got a tattoo, started smoking,….I did my own thing cause I didn’t really fit in to any particular group. I started writing music, taught myself guitar and then started working at this coffee shop where I could play.

What type of music were you listening to then?
Music wise, when I was younger I was into folk, Americana, musical theatre, and then in high school I was into country and gangsta rap

Those are two very different genres!
You wouldn’t think that these are similar in any way, but when you listen to either country or rap, it’s people telling their story. Indie rock can be more obtuse or obscure. Country and rap is some one speaking in the first person, you know? It’s more like, “this is my story, this is my experience.”

Do you respond to music that is more heartfelt and honest?
Totally, but I like all kinds of stuff. Although I don’t really listen to music to get inspired for my own music.

Did you move to California immediately after high school?
First I went to Colorado, to go to study at Colorado State. I was playing music and sang with a DJ there, and he ended up getting our song placed on tv shows. That was a catalyst for me; I realised that I could make a living making music, maybe eventually a good living! And then I went and did a semester of school (our version of uni) in Paris. I was singing there as well; I met a woman who helped me get shows in bars, and I also got some stuff played on college radio. After that I dropped out of school, and moved to LA – only cause I figured that that’s where you go when you want to be a singer!

Comparisons have been made to the hazy and bohemian rock n’ roll that came out of Laurel Canyon in the 70′s (think Joni Mitchell, The Doors, and Stevie Nicks). Lissie’s 2010 version is honed from living in an area not more than a mile or two away; Beechwood Canyon, a creative hub of artists and musicians and a world away from the plastic glamour and sheen of Beverly Hills. Los Angeles is known for chewing up and spitting up many a wide eyed starlet and ingenue, but strong-willed Lissie was never going to be one of the victims….
I don’t know if it’s me being stubborn, or being from the Mid West, but….I’m not bullshit, I don’t want bullshit in my life. I’m still nice, you know? I was never tempted by (the LA madness.) I always knew what I wanted to do. And I wasn’t immediately successful… I had figured that by 22 I was gonna make a record, and I didn’t make one till I was 26. But I was never like “I’m never going to be successful, maybe I need to be skinnier, or prettier, or I need to start doing drugs!

A year ago (while dealing with the messy end of a relationship) Lissie made a decision – part gut instinct, part cosmic order – to leave LA and head north to the tranquil town of Ojai, a place that she had never even stepped foot in…

Do you get inspired by the peace of Ojai?
Unfortunately i was more inspired to write when I was in Hollywood, because there was more more me to get worked up about. (sighs) There was this guy that I dated…… we broke up and our breakup process was drawn out and painful, which gave me a lot of material (laughs). Part of the reason why I moved was because it felt like my family was broken, and I needed a change. I put it out there; I was on a plane coming back from Tennessee and…. sometimes I just say what I want, and try to have faith that it will happen, and this is the weird thing; I found myself sitting next to two people who lived in Ojai, and I told them that I was heading back to LA, and they suggested I visit Ojai. So I got back to LA and instantly knew that I couldn’t be there; there was something in me that said “you have to move to Ojai, even though I had never been there before!” I went online, and found this house that cost less than my apartment in LA . I put down a deposit and moved, gone! And it was the best thing for me. I totally healed my heart there, and got myself in a position where I could really focus on myself, and what I need to do. I live alone, with my dog, I go for walks. And I make a ton of pie! (laughs)

So you have a summer of touring in England?
Yeah, every day we get a revised schedule. We’re (Lissie and her band) doing festivals for the next few months, and in October, November and December there will be at least one thing a month going on in England, so it’s unclear whether we will just stay here or start our momentum in the States, ’cause I still have to go promote my album over there. I don’t exactly know what’s going to be happening, but it’s all good.

Dee-Andrews-Bethan-Smith
Bethan Smith by Dee Andrews.

This year, thumb for the first time, Latitude Festival will be hosting repeat runs of the graduate fashion shows from Central Saint Martins and Chelsea College of Art and Design: lovingly reproduced on a special catwalk by the lake near the Waterfront Stage.

Don’t miss this opportunity to catch some of the best up and coming fashion designers showcasing their work in such a wonderful setting, so very far from the usual hubbub associated with urban fashion shows.

Of course I couldn’t resist putting a sneak preview of the best designers out to a host of illustrators…

Central Saint Martins

Abi Daker - Sorcha O'Raghallaigh
Sorcha O’Raghallaigh by Abigail Daker.

Check the amazing chiffon head-dressed swirling layers from Sorcha O’Raghallaigh, all based on the film Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. We particularly loved Sorcha‘s stuff in this previous blog post.

Zoe-Sherwood-lisa stannard
Zoe Sherwood by Lisa Stannard.

or fabulous feathers and dip dyeing from Zoe Sherwood – all based on the different stages of a bird in flight

Dee-Andrews-Anne-Karine-Thorbjoernsen
Dee-Andrews-Anne-Karine-Thorbjoernsen
Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen by Dee Andrews.

or how about Russian Constructivist theory transferred into stunning spiked dresses courtesy of Anne Karine Thorbjoersen?

yuann-shen-felipe rojas-llanos
Felipe Rojas Llanos by Yuann Shen.

not to mention the couture influenced pod shaped menswear from Felipe Rojas Llanos

and from Chelsea College of Art and Design

Dee-Andrews-Bethan-Smith
Bethan Smith by Dee Andrews.

Look out especially for sculptural textiles from Bethan Smith, inspired by Native American ceremonial dress

bethparry_rachelclareprice
Beth Parry by Rachel Clare Price.

twisted knitwear from Beth Parry

Lauren-T-Franks-by-Barbara Ana Gomez
Lauren T-Franks by Barbara Ana Gomez.

contemporary folklore from Lauren T-Franks

Abi Daker - Sophie Parker
Sophie Parker by Abigail Daker.

wide-checked pants and quilted capes from Sophie Parker

donna.mckenzie.nichola.orchard
donna.mckenzie.nichola.orchard
Nichola Orchard by Donna McKenzie.

ruffled and bumped accessories inspired by skin and mountain ranges from Nichola Orchard

ELLEN-CHATELAIN-by-Lisa-Stannard
Ellen Chatelain by Lisa Stannard.

knitted patchwork stripey jumpsuits inspired by 1960s science fiction from Ellen Chatelain

Sine-Skau-Shawana-Grosvenor.jpg
Shawana Grosvenor by Sine Skau.

and creamy circular tailoring from Shawana Grosvenor.

Models will be provided by Elite, which might well excite the man in your life… and this major model agency will also be scouting the festival for the next big thing. Ooo-eeeee. Will you be down by the lakeside this weekend?

Categories ,Abigail Daker, ,Anne Karine Thorbjoersen, ,Barbara Ana Gomez, ,Beth Parry, ,Bethan Smith, ,catwalk, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Chelsea College of Art and Design, ,Dee Andrews, ,Donna McKenzie, ,Elite Models, ,Ellen Chatelain, ,Fashion Show, ,Felipe Rojas Llanos, ,Graduate Show, ,Latitude Festival, ,Lauren T-Franks, ,Lisa Stannard, ,models, ,Nichola Orchard, ,Rachel Clare Price, ,Russian Constructivism, ,Shawana Grosvenor, ,Sine Skau, ,Sophie Parker, ,Sorcha O’Raghallaigh, ,Waterfront Stage, ,Yuann Shen, ,Zoe Sherwood

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week: 2010 FAD Junior Awards


Illustration by Abby Wright

It’s always a treat at Fashion Week to find that the show you are about to see, decease starting in the next few minutes, is at a totally different venue to the one you had in your head and are currently standing at. I found myself in this marvellous situation as Tim Soar’s show approached. God knows why I thought it was at Somerset House and not at the Freemason’s Hall. Menswear day brought these kind of surprises all day – with many designers scaling down their presence. I had seen Tim’s show a year ago in the BFC tent, so how dare they move its location?!

I need not have worried as I legged it up Drury Lane, for, true to form, the show was running late and hadn’t even been seated when I showed up. I was right at the back of the queue, though – AGAIN – so decided to perch by the photographer’s pit in the hope of getting a better shot than I would have positioned on one of the back rows.

This show saw Soar draw inspiration from the 1970s, and in particular David Bowie’s character ‘Mr Newton’ in Nicholas Roeg’s epic ‘The Man Who Fell From Earth.’ This inspiration was, in true Tim Soar style, handled with delicacy and acted only as a descrete reference here and there. Trousers flared off, but not in a grotesque fancy dress sense, and lapels were elongated, but not in a Stayin’ Alive, Stayin’ Alive, Hah Hah Hah Hah sense. The bulk of the collection relied on Soar’s showmanship as a really great tailor with a unique vision.


Illustration by Abby Wright

Making the best use of luxe fabrics like mohair, satin, wool crepe and linen, models wore strict suits with a piecemeal utilitarian aesthetic. The use of Tyvek, the waxy crushed industrial material usually reserved for workers boiler suits, also adds to this technical flavour.

Blazers were banded with cummerbund-like straps in contrasting colours – where jackets were dark, the bands were of gold silk, and where jackets were sand, the bands were black. Denim made an appearance, also creating horizontal lines across structured tailoring.

Alongside this semi-formal attire, there were the usual design quirks that Tim Soar is quickly faming himself for. His appreciation of the aesthetic properties of materials and quality of texture was also on display, with crushed materials and bursts of vibrant colour (he is, after all, also a graphic designer).

It’s hard to imagine how a Tyvek jailer-style striped suit will work alongside an exemplary tailored blazer, but somehow Tim Soar’s collections always convey a stylish coherence.

This season also brought more womenswear, which is basically menswear with allowances for hips, busts and bums. It’s a testament to Tim Soar’s generally cool attitude, though, that his aesthetic works wonders on both women and men.


Illustration by Abby Wright

It’s always a treat at Fashion Week to find that the show you are about to see, doctor starting in the next few minutes, is at a totally different venue to the one you had in your head and are currently standing at. I found myself in this marvellous situation as Tim Soar’s show approached. God knows why I thought it was at Somerset House and not at the Freemason’s Hall. Menswear day brought these kind of surprises all day – with many designers scaling down their presence. I had seen Tim’s show a year ago in the BFC tent, so how dare they move its location?!

I need not have worried as I legged it up Drury Lane, for, true to form, the show was running late and hadn’t even been seated when I showed up. I was right at the back of the queue, though – AGAIN – so decided to perch by the photographer’s pit in the hope of getting a better shot than I would have positioned on one of the back rows.

This show saw Soar draw inspiration from the 1970s, and in particular David Bowie’s character ‘Mr Newton’ in Nicholas Roeg’s epic ‘The Man Who Fell From Earth.’ This inspiration was, in true Tim Soar style, handled with delicacy and acted only as a descrete reference here and there. Trousers flared off, but not in a grotesque fancy dress sense, and lapels were elongated, but not in a Stayin’ Alive, Stayin’ Alive, Hah Hah Hah Hah sense. The bulk of the collection relied on Soar’s showmanship as a really great tailor with a unique vision.


Illustration by Abby Wright

Making the best use of luxe fabrics like mohair, satin, wool crepe and linen, models wore strict suits with a piecemeal utilitarian aesthetic. The use of Tyvek, the waxy crushed industrial material usually reserved for workers boiler suits, also adds to this technical flavour.

Blazers were banded with cummerbund-like straps in contrasting colours – where jackets were dark, the bands were of gold silk, and where jackets were sand, the bands were black. Denim made an appearance, also creating horizontal lines across structured tailoring.

Alongside this semi-formal attire, there were the usual design quirks that Tim Soar is quickly faming himself for. His appreciation of the aesthetic properties of materials and quality of texture was also on display, with crushed materials and bursts of vibrant colour (he is, after all, also a graphic designer).

It’s hard to imagine how a Tyvek jailer-style striped suit will work alongside an exemplary tailored blazer, but somehow Tim Soar’s collections always convey a stylish coherence.

This season also brought more womenswear, which is basically menswear with allowances for hips, busts and bums. It’s a testament to Tim Soar’s generally cool attitude, though, that his aesthetic works wonders on both women and men.


Illustration by Yuann Shen

Born in India, sale Stefan Orschel-Read grew up in Scotland, he won gold medals as a dressage rider for Great Britain and also studied law before deciding on a career in fashion. His Central Saint Martins graduate collection in 2008 was based on Virginia Wolfe’s novel ‘Orlando’; a historical biography in which the subject’s lives over 400 years and changes gender mid way. Subsequent collections were inspired by cathedral murals and the works of Shakespeare, so it was interesting to see the RCA graduate’s stimulus for S/S 2011 being something a slightly more conventional.

Entitled ‘The Spy Who Becomes Me’, SS11 is inspired by an imagined playboy youth in the Riviera of the Ligurian Sea and his struggle to evolve into ‘a self-sufficient gentleman of responsibilities’.

Although more subdued than his previous seasons, this sophisticated collection successfully utlilised an array of luxurious fabrics which were expertly tailored and incorporated some distinctive detailing. The tag line of the collection is ’We all have a little bit of espionage in us’, but I doubt Orschel Read would be the best outfitter for a Bond-style spy-on-a-mission who hopes to be easily lost in a crowd.

Looks were presented in a refined palette of greys, soft khakis and airforce blues, punctuated with jewel tones and blazes of iridescence.


Illustration by Yuann Shen

Modern slim-fitting suits with traces of utilitarian military styling, such as extended epaulettes, were created in sumptuous British cashmere tailoring wools and iridescent tonic suiting.  The blazers at the more muted end of the palette were complemented with dupion silk shirts, glowing in emerald and olive tones.

Digitally printed monograms, paisley and bird motifs were applied to boxers and shirt panels, some silk brocade being produced in collaboration with Italian luxury tailor Brioni, apparently the go-to-coutouriers of a whole host of names from Nelson Mandela to Robert Kennedy and Luciano Pavarotti to Donald Trump.

Alongside his blazers and formal trousers, Orschel-Read showed biker jackets in cashmere suiting, jeans named after MI5 and MI6 and gauzy hand dyed and beaded bias cut vests seen under many of the blazers.  Oversized trench coats in pale denim continued the spy theme, and monogrammed underwear was shown with raglan sleeve sweaters with rib detailing.


Illustration by Yuann Shen

Born in India, decease Stefan Orschel-Read grew up in Scotland, he won gold medals as a dressage rider for Great Britain and also studied law before deciding on a career in fashion. His Central Saint Martins graduate collection in 2008 was based on Virginia Wolfe’s novel ‘Orlando’; a historical biography in which the subject’s lives over 400 years and changes gender mid way. Subsequent collections were inspired by cathedral murals and the works of Shakespeare, so it was interesting to see the RCA graduate’s stimulus for S/S 2011 being something a slightly more conventional.

Entitled ‘The Spy Who Becomes Me’, SS11 is inspired by an imagined playboy youth in the Riviera of the Ligurian Sea and his struggle to evolve into ‘a self-sufficient gentleman of responsibilities’.

Although more subdued than his previous seasons, this sophisticated collection successfully utlilised an array of luxurious fabrics which were expertly tailored and incorporated some distinctive detailing. The tag line of the collection is ’We all have a little bit of espionage in us’, but I doubt Orschel Read would be the best outfitter for a Bond-style spy-on-a-mission who hopes to be easily lost in a crowd.

Looks were presented in a refined palette of greys, soft khakis and airforce blues, punctuated with jewel tones and blazes of iridescence.


Illustration by Yuann Shen

Modern slim-fitting suits with traces of utilitarian military styling, such as extended epaulettes, were created in sumptuous British cashmere tailoring wools and iridescent tonic suiting.  The blazers at the more muted end of the palette were complemented with dupion silk shirts, glowing in emerald and olive tones.

Digitally printed monograms, paisley and bird motifs were applied to boxers and shirt panels, some silk brocade being produced in collaboration with Italian luxury tailor Brioni, apparently the go-to-coutouriers of a whole host of names from Nelson Mandela to Robert Kennedy and Luciano Pavarotti to Donald Trump.

Alongside his blazers and formal trousers, Orschel-Read showed biker jackets in cashmere suiting, jeans named after MI5 and MI6 and gauzy hand dyed and beaded bias cut vests seen under many of the blazers.  Oversized trench coats in pale denim continued the spy theme, and monogrammed underwear was shown with raglan sleeve sweaters with rib detailing.

FADAwards-the tightrope walker-Florence Melrose by-Barbara-Ana-G
The Tightrope Walker – an illustration of a dress designed by Florence Melrose, find illustrated by Barbara Ana Gomez.

I’m a bit rubbish when it actually comes to checking what’s what during fashion week – I will generally go to most things that I’m invited to on the grounds that if someone has bothered to invite me then I should generally return the honour by actually turning up. Not so most magazine editors I might add – many was the time that I would swan into a fashion show under the guise of Katie Grand at The Face. She never went, approved and yours truly got the golden tickets.

FAD awards SS2011 - abi daker
Dress by Rebecca Glyn-Blanco of Camden School for Girls. Illustration by Abigail Daker.

FADAwards Keep it secret-by-Barbara-Ana-Gomez
Keep it Secret – illustration of a dress by Sinead Cloonan from City & Islington College by Barbara Ana Gomez.

And as I’ve already mentioned I don’t do queues – not in Tescos, prescription and certainly not during fashion week. To this end my heart sank as I rounded the corner to Freemasons’ Hall and found a line of people streaming down the street. What was this FAD awards malarkey anyway? Heading to the front of the queue I waggled my ticket at an unknown PR person and hoped for the best, so was somewhat surprised to be informed in hushed tones that I was a VIP and could go straight on through. Upstairs in one of the many architecturally fabulous chambers, Matt and I sipped on sweet fizzy stuff as we tried to figure out what this was all about.

FAD-Awards-sketches-Amelias-Magazine-by-kila_kitu
FAD-Awards 2010-Kila Kitu
Dress by Yashodah Rodgers as illustrated by Kila Kitu.

Apparently we’ve been very supportive of FAD in the past, and once I’d looked up our previous coverage it did suddenly all ring a bell. But I wasn’t quite prepared for the sheer unadulterated upbeat joy of this event. Right in the thick of a hectic fashion week it’s a true testament to the achievement of this organisation that I could sit through yet another long catwalk show and come out the other end beaming with goodwill.

LFW_FAD_Awards_Abigail_Nottingham
The European Fashion Designer award winning dress from Paul Vasileff and Shahira Bakhoum. Illustrated by Abigail Nottingham.

FADAwards Flower-Rebecca Glyn-Blanco by-Barbara-Ana-G
Rebecca Glyn-Blanco by Barbara Ana Gomez.

Just to recap quickly, FAD stands for Fashion Awareness Direct and it is a charity that aims to empower young people – as the brochure says “Fashion is a great way to connect with young people from different backgrounds, to give them confidence and raise their aspirations for the future.”

FAD awards SS2011 - Adam Preece by Abi Daker
Adam Preece by Abigail Daker.

LFW_FAD_awards Chelsey Ward by Abigail-Nottingham
Chelsey Ward by Abigail Nottingham.

Last year we covered the undergraduates awards show, but this year we were in for a much younger treat: the FAD Junior Awards showcased the designs of finalists chosen from 130 teenagers aged 16-19. Yes dear reader, you may well have to keep pinching yourself as you take a look through the images. I know I did, and I was sitting right there when they paraded past. Created over the course of five days at the University of East London with the help of an experienced team of tutors, the outfits put together by these young designers would put many graduates to shame.

LFW_FAD_Awards Karmen-Marie Parker by Abigail_Nottingham
Karmen-Marie Parker by Abigail Nottingham.

FAD-Awards-Natalie Goreham by-kila_kitu
Natalie Goreham by Kila Kitu.

To start off the evening’s events previous finalist Prash Muraleetharan took to the stage with a bit of confident advice, endearingly delivered. “It’s what you do with this moment which determines a winner…. so get upstairs and network,” he advised, somewhat sagely. At the end he winked. And I’m sure he winked at me. Blimey… what a charmer… it’s quite hard to countenance that Prash must still be a teenager, and yet he already runs his own fashion label with a website and everything.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prash Muraleetharan dispels his words of wisdom at the start of the ceremony. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

After the V&A inspired catwalk show we had speeches from the sleek Susan Aubrey-Cound of M&S and Lucy Jones of UEL, followed by the prizegiving by the extremely fabulous Zandra Rhodes, who is *the cutest* when she smiles! The winners and their parents looked so overwhelmed it really did warm the cockles of my jaded fashionista heart.

Zandra-Rhodes-FAD-Awards-2010-Antonia-Parker-Amelias-Magazine-A
Zandra Rhodes by Antonia Parker. I wuv her.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Paul Vasileff and Shahira Bakhoum of Milan step up first to take the prize for the European Fashion Designer Competition, which was the culmination of a two year project.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Karmen-Marie Parker with her winning design shortly before she burst into tears… aw, bless.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Andre Augusto: pattern cutting award winner.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Research award winner Sarah Kilkenny.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
17 year old David Short – the first boy to become overall winner and a proper little fashionista in the making.

Within this blog you’ll find my favourite pieces to hit the runway – and just remember, they were all designed and made by 16-19 year olds. Quite astonishing I’m sure you’ll agree.

FAD junior awards 2010 Shomari Williams photo by Amelia Gregory
Shomari Williams.

FAD junior awards 2010 Emily Rogers photo by Amelia Gregory
Yashodah Rodgers.

FAD junior awards 2010 Charlie Ibouillie photo by Amelia Gregory
Charlie Ibouillie.

FAD junior awards 2010 Sinead Cloonan photo by Amelia Gregory
Sinead Cloonan.

FAD junior awards 2010 European winners photo by Amelia Gregory
FAD junior awards 2010 European winners photo by Amelia Gregory
The winner of the European competition.

FAD junior awards 2010 Rebecca Glyn-Blanco photo by Amelia Gregory
Rebecca Glyn-Blanco.

FAD junior awards 2010 Natalie Goreham photo by Amelia Gregory
Natalie Goreham.

FAD junior awards 2010 Florence Melrose photo by Amelia Gregory
Florence Melrose.

FAD junior awards 2010 Misbah Siddique photo by Amelia Gregory
Misbah Siddique.

FAD junior awards 2010 Zandra Rhodes photo by Amelia Gregory
And another completely gratuitous shot of Zandra because this post isn’t long enough already. Because I WUV HER.

Categories ,Abigail Daker, ,Abigail Nottingham, ,Adam Preece, ,Andre Augusto, ,Antonia Parker, ,Barbara Ana Gomez, ,Charlie Ibouillie, ,Chelsey Ward, ,City & Islington College, ,David Short, ,European Fashion Designer Competition, ,FAD, ,FAD Junior Awards, ,Fashion Scout, ,Florence Melrose, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Karmen-Marie Parker, ,Katie Grand, ,Kila Kitu, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Lucy Jones, ,M&S, ,Misbah Siddique, ,Natalie Goreham, ,Paul Vasileff, ,Prash London, ,Prash Muraleetharan, ,Rebecca Glyn-Blanco, ,Salford City College, ,Sarah Kilkenny, ,Shahira Bakhoum, ,Shomari Williams, ,Sinead Cloonan, ,Susan Aubrey-Cound, ,The Face, ,University of East London, ,va, ,Yashodah Rodgers, ,Zandra Rhodes

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week: 2010 FAD Junior Awards

FADAwards-the tightrope walker-Florence Melrose by-Barbara-Ana-G
The Tightrope Walker – an illustration of a dress designed by Florence Melrose, illustrated by Barbara Ana Gomez.

I’m a bit rubbish when it actually comes to checking what’s what during fashion week – I will generally go to most things that I’m invited to on the grounds that if someone has bothered to invite me then I should generally return the honour by actually turning up. Not so most magazine editors I might add – many was the time that I would swan into a fashion show under the guise of Katie Grand at The Face. She never went, and yours truly got the golden tickets.

FAD awards SS2011 - abi daker
Dress by Rebecca Glyn-Blanco of Camden School for Girls. Illustration by Abigail Daker.

FADAwards Keep it secret-by-Barbara-Ana-Gomez
Keep it Secret – illustration of a dress by Sinead Cloonan from City & Islington College by Barbara Ana Gomez.

And as I’ve already mentioned I don’t do queues – not in Tescos, and certainly not during fashion week. To this end my heart sank as I rounded the corner to Freemasons’ Hall and found a line of people streaming down the street. What was this FAD awards malarkey anyway? Heading to the front of the queue I waggled my ticket at an unknown PR person and hoped for the best, so was somewhat surprised to be informed in hushed tones that I was a VIP and could go straight on through. Upstairs in one of the many architecturally fabulous chambers, Matt and I sipped on sweet fizzy stuff as we tried to figure out what this was all about.

FAD-Awards-sketches-Amelias-Magazine-by-kila_kitu
FAD-Awards 2010-Kila Kitu
Dress by Yashodah Rodgers as illustrated by Kila Kitu.

Apparently we’ve been very supportive of FAD in the past, and once I’d looked up our previous coverage it did suddenly all ring a bell. But I wasn’t quite prepared for the sheer unadulterated upbeat joy of this event. Right in the thick of a hectic fashion week it’s a true testament to the achievement of this organisation that I could sit through yet another long catwalk show and come out the other end beaming with goodwill.

LFW_FAD_Awards_Abigail_Nottingham
The European Fashion Designer award winning dress from Paul Vasileff and Shahira Bakhoum. Illustrated by Abigail Nottingham.

FADAwards Flower-Rebecca Glyn-Blanco by-Barbara-Ana-G
Rebecca Glyn-Blanco by Barbara Ana Gomez.

Just to recap quickly, FAD stands for Fashion Awareness Direct and it is a charity that aims to empower young people – as the brochure says “Fashion is a great way to connect with young people from different backgrounds, to give them confidence and raise their aspirations for the future.”

FAD awards SS2011 - Adam Preece by Abi Daker
Adam Preece by Abigail Daker.

LFW_FAD_awards Chelsey Ward by Abigail-Nottingham
Chelsey Ward by Abigail Nottingham.

Last year we covered the undergraduates awards show, but this year we were in for a much younger treat: the FAD Junior Awards showcased the designs of finalists chosen from 130 teenagers aged 16-19. Yes dear reader, you may well have to keep pinching yourself as you take a look through the images. I know I did, and I was sitting right there when they paraded past. Created over the course of five days at the University of East London with the help of an experienced team of tutors, the outfits put together by these young designers would put many graduates to shame.

LFW_FAD_Awards Karmen-Marie Parker by Abigail_Nottingham
Karmen-Marie Parker by Abigail Nottingham.

FAD-Awards-Natalie Goreham by-kila_kitu
Natalie Goreham by Kila Kitu.

To start off the evening’s events previous finalist Prash Muraleetharan took to the stage with a bit of confident advice, endearingly delivered. “It’s what you do with this moment which determines a winner…. so get upstairs and network,” he advised, somewhat sagely. At the end he winked. And I’m sure he winked at me. Blimey… what a charmer… it’s quite hard to countenance that Prash must still be a teenager, and yet he already runs his own fashion label with a website and everything.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prash Muraleetharan dispels his words of wisdom at the start of the ceremony. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

After the V&A inspired catwalk show we had speeches from the sleek Susan Aubrey-Cound of M&S and Lucy Jones of UEL, followed by the prizegiving by the extremely fabulous Zandra Rhodes, who is *the cutest* when she smiles! The winners and their parents looked so overwhelmed it really did warm the cockles of my jaded fashionista heart.

Zandra-Rhodes-FAD-Awards-2010-Antonia-Parker-Amelias-Magazine-A
Zandra Rhodes by Antonia Parker. I wuv her.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Paul Vasileff and Shahira Bakhoum of Milan step up first to take the prize for the European Fashion Designer Competition, which was the culmination of a two year project.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Karmen-Marie Parker with her winning design shortly before she burst into tears… aw, bless.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Andre Augusto: pattern cutting award winner.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Research award winner Sarah Kilkenny.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
17 year old David Short – the first boy to become overall winner and a proper little fashionista in the making.

Within this blog you’ll find my favourite pieces to hit the runway – and just remember, they were all designed and made by 16-19 year olds. Quite astonishing I’m sure you’ll agree.

FAD junior awards 2010 Shomari Williams photo by Amelia Gregory
Shomari Williams.

FAD junior awards 2010 Emily Rogers photo by Amelia Gregory
Yashodah Rodgers.

FAD junior awards 2010 Charlie Ibouillie photo by Amelia Gregory
Charlie Ibouillie.

FAD junior awards 2010 Sinead Cloonan photo by Amelia Gregory
Sinead Cloonan.

FAD junior awards 2010 European winners photo by Amelia Gregory
FAD junior awards 2010 European winners photo by Amelia Gregory
The winner of the European competition.

FAD junior awards 2010 Rebecca Glyn-Blanco photo by Amelia Gregory
Rebecca Glyn-Blanco.

FAD junior awards 2010 Natalie Goreham photo by Amelia Gregory
Natalie Goreham.

FAD junior awards 2010 Florence Melrose photo by Amelia Gregory
Florence Melrose.

FAD junior awards 2010 Misbah Siddique photo by Amelia Gregory
Misbah Siddique.

FAD junior awards 2010 Zandra Rhodes photo by Amelia Gregory
And another completely gratuitous shot of Zandra because this post isn’t long enough already. Because I WUV HER.

Categories ,Abigail Daker, ,Abigail Nottingham, ,Adam Preece, ,Andre Augusto, ,Antonia Parker, ,Barbara Ana Gomez, ,Charlie Ibouillie, ,Chelsey Ward, ,City & Islington College, ,David Short, ,European Fashion Designer Competition, ,FAD, ,FAD Junior Awards, ,Fashion Scout, ,Florence Melrose, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Karmen-Marie Parker, ,Katie Grand, ,Kila Kitu, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Lucy Jones, ,M&S, ,Misbah Siddique, ,Natalie Goreham, ,Paul Vasileff, ,Prash London, ,Prash Muraleetharan, ,Rebecca Glyn-Blanco, ,Salford City College, ,Sarah Kilkenny, ,Shahira Bakhoum, ,Shomari Williams, ,Sinead Cloonan, ,Susan Aubrey-Cound, ,The Face, ,University of East London, ,va, ,Yashodah Rodgers, ,Zandra Rhodes

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Amelia’s Magazine | Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration Launch Party at Concrete Hermit

Yellow and White mac 008Image courtesy of Christopher Raeburn

Christopher Raeburn
A designer whose name is never far from any eco fashion list is that of Christopher Raeburn, viagra sale who is famed for his high end, more about innovative and functional fashion created using re-appropriated military fabrics. Sourcing his material from de-commissioned military stock and hot-air balloon canvas among other materials Raeburn both redesigns and manufactures his groundbreaking garments ethically within the UK.

PB121954Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

Of his SS10 collection Christopher says: “This season presents a great opportunity to play with colour, page negative space and flowing lines; from its inception I wanted to create an upbeat, fresh and experimental collection.”
With the emphasis on rouching, contrasting geometric panels and colourful taped seams Raeburn utilises laser cutting techniques for the first time introducing repeat patterns of concentric circle cut-outs which are peppered throughout the collection cleverly hidden between panels and layered hoods and sleeves.

Parachute dress

Image courtesy of Christopher Raeburn

What is most striking about Raeburn’s new contemporary collection of dresses, ponchos, skirts and macs is how well his colour palette and themes work together with layer, light and silhouette being the main focuses. With the majority of fabric used being transparent it is Raeburn’s bright accents of colour and playful dots that really inject life into the garments, and are reminiscent of jellyfish.

Purple and White Jacket with matching bag 006

Image courtesy of Christopher Raeburn

Rather excitingly the new collection also features accessories for the first time, with Raeburn fusing woven netting with his trademark parachute fabric and cord to great effect adding to the high impact of this super functional range.

Lu Flux

PB121959Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

Another exciting designer who we’re predicting big things for next year is the lovely Lu Flux; who has just launched her debut collection after being named ‘London’s newest one to watch’ at Vauxhall Fashion Scout earlier in the year. What sets Lu’s designs apart is that her work is created using salvaged, vintage and organic fabrics, which she cleverly combines with traditional techniques such as knitting, pleating and patchwork.

PB121960Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

Lu’s witty and playful SS10 collection titled ‘The Eco Life of Riley’ is inspired by the ‘humble bluetit’ which is cleverly juxtaposed with bold jarring graphics throughout the collection. If developing her own eco brand wasn’t enough of a challenge Lu is also busy working on a project called Soko Kenya, which was conceived over two years ago when she visited the small coastal town of Ukunda in Kenya. The idea behind this project is to work in conjunction with local Kenyan tailors who attend the community owned Ukunda Youth Polytechnic, which offers basic vocational training to local residents at a low cost.

PB121962Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

This collaboration will see Soko invest a minimum of 5% gross earnings into the Polytechnic annually in addition to year-round fundraising to help acquire sewing machines and other essential equipment for the students. Additionally Soko are committed to providing support in the design and running of the Polytechnic’s existing tailoring department and syllabus according to international fair-trade and eco production standards.

PB121961Image courtesy of Rachael Oku depicting Soko Kenya products

Most importantly both parties are committed to working together to transform the Polytechnic into an eco institution by introducing a rainwater catchment system and working to create solar generated electricity. To find out more about this great project and where to buy Soko Kenya products head to their website.

Apron Dress and BodysuitImage courtesy of Julia Smith

Julia Smith
Another groundbreaking designer who caught our attention was Julia Smith, a designer who has graced the webpages of Amelia’s magazine a few times previously. Julia’s SS10 collection entitled ‘Nurture Me’ explores the idea of mixing beauty with function. Part inspired by the 1930′s and 1940′s, when loose shapes and function were paramount Julia’s collection also references the concept of underwear as outerwear. Created using tactile fabrics such as soy, bamboo and organic cotton and linen Julia cleverly juxtaposes these with recycled polyester which is made from recycled plastic (PET) bottles.

Lara Jacket and Power BodyImage courtesy of Julia Smith

What really sets Julia apart is her second line aptly titled ‘Julia Smith Made in Africa’, which supports lives in Ghana through the vision of Mrs. Marian Essel, a highly skilled batik printer from Ghana, West Africa. Having worked for the Global Mamas in Cape Coast, Marian and Julia Smith have now formed a co-operative in the suburbs of Accra, Ghana’s capital city, offering employment opportunities to the struggling community.

Made in Africa 1Image courtesy of Julia Smith depicting the Made in Africa collection

With Marian using all the proceeds of her work to employ disadvantaged adults as well as sponsoring children so that they can go to school, this is a fantastic initiative which aims to help everyone within the community get the best educational start in life. The ‘Julia Smith Made in Africa’ collection is stocked in Julia’s new flagship store in Marble Arch’s Connaught Village.

Matt and Nat
A new brand to Amelia’s magazine which is fast becoming a firm favourite is that of Matt & Nat, a pioneering vegan luxury accessories label who create animal free products for both men and women. Interestingly (which I’m hoping you’ll agree) Matt & Nat is not a design duo as the name would suggest but is instead founded by Inder Bedi who was challenged almost 20 years ago to forgo animal products for 30 days. Ever since he has made a conscious effort to use recycled and greener materials in his work steering clear of leather, wool and animal by-products.

For SS10 Matt & Nat are continuing where they left off last season with their 21 water bottles campaign which sees all the linings in their handbags and wallets created using 100% recycled plastic, with each accessory using an average of 21 bottles.

With the inspirations for their SS10 collection being biker chic and glam rock, each bag has been embellished differently with everything from studs to zip details. Made primarily from eel skin (incidentally the softest type of leather I have ever felt,) the colour palette of fiery scarlet, intense blue and blush pink bring a vintage feel to the pieces.

Henrietta Ludgate
A great designer who has already received quite a bit of media attention in 2009 is Henrietta Ludgate, who won the Ethical Fashion Forum ‘Fashion Innovation Award’ earlier in the year. Creating sustainable and sculptural garments from her studio in the remote Highlands of Scotland, Henrietta stays close to her Scotch roots by working primarily with Scottish linen.

With a brand ethos to support both the Scottish and British textile industry as a whole, all fabrics are sourced from within the British Isles with all pieces produced locally.

A champion of slow fashion, Henrietta’s minimalist silhouette remains hauntingly elegant and distinctive. For inspiration Henrietta often looks to Elsa Schiaparelli, and her vision of fashion as a type of architecture, and beliefs that clothing should be ‘closely connected to the frame of the body’.

With the recent opening of a swanky new showroom in London’s Covent Garden, things are looking bright for 2010.
Stay tuned for the second instalment tomorrow…
Yellow and White mac 008Image courtesy of Christopher Raeburn

Christopher Raeburn
A designer whose name is never far from any eco fashion list is that of Christopher Raeburn, cure who is famed for his high end, innovative and functional fashion created using re-appropriated military fabrics. Sourcing his material from de-commissioned military stock and hot-air balloon canvas among other materials Raeburn both redesigns and manufactures his groundbreaking garments ethically within the UK.

PB121954Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

Of his SS10 collection Christopher says: “This season presents a great opportunity to play with colour, negative space and flowing lines; from its inception I wanted to create an upbeat, fresh and experimental collection.”
With the emphasis on rouching, contrasting geometric panels and colourful taped seams Raeburn utilises laser cutting techniques for the first time introducing repeat patterns of concentric circle cut-outs which are peppered throughout the collection cleverly hidden between panels and layered hoods and sleeves.

Parachute dress

Image courtesy of Christopher Raeburn

What is most striking about Raeburn’s new contemporary collection of dresses, ponchos, skirts and macs is how well his colour palette and themes work together with layer, light and silhouette being the main focuses. With the majority of fabric used being transparent it is Raeburn’s bright accents of colour and playful dots that really inject life into the garments, and are reminiscent of jellyfish.

Purple and White Jacket with matching bag 006

Image courtesy of Christopher Raeburn

Rather excitingly the new collection also features accessories for the first time, with Raeburn fusing woven netting with his trademark parachute fabric and cord to great effect adding to the high impact of this super functional range.

Lu FluxPB121959Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

Another exciting designer who we’re predicting big things for next year is the lovely Lu Flux; who has just launched her debut collection after being named ‘London’s newest one to watch’ at Vauxhall Fashion Scout earlier in the year. What sets Lu’s designs apart is that her work is created using salvaged, vintage and organic fabrics, which she cleverly combines with traditional techniques such as knitting, pleating and patchwork.

PB121960Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

Lu’s witty and playful SS10 collection titled ‘The Eco Life of Riley’ is inspired by the ‘humble bluetit’ which is cleverly juxtaposed with bold jarring graphics throughout the collection. If developing her own eco brand wasn’t enough of a challenge Lu is also busy working on a project called Soko Kenya, which was conceived over two years ago when she visited the small coastal town of Ukunda in Kenya. The idea behind this project is to work in conjunction with local Kenyan tailors who attend the community owned Ukunda Youth Polytechnic, which offers basic vocational training to local residents at a low cost.

PB121962Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

This collaboration will see Soko invest a minimum of 5% gross earnings into the Polytechnic annually in addition to year-round fundraising to help acquire sewing machines and other essential equipment for the students. Additionally Soko are committed to providing support in the design and running of the Polytechnic’s existing tailoring department and syllabus according to international fair-trade and eco production standards.

PB121961Image courtesy of Rachael Oku depicting Soko Kenya products

Most importantly both parties are committed to working together to transform the Polytechnic into an eco institution by introducing a rainwater catchment system and working to create solar generated electricity. To find out more about this great project and where to buy Soko Kenya products head to their website.

Apron Dress and BodysuitImage courtesy of Julia Smith

Julia Smith
Another groundbreaking designer who caught our attention was Julia Smith, a designer who has graced the webpages of Amelia’s magazine a few times previously. Julia’s SS10 collection entitled ‘Nurture Me’ explores the idea of mixing beauty with function. Part inspired by the 1930′s and 1940′s, when loose shapes and function were paramount Julia’s collection also references the concept of underwear as outerwear. Created using tactile fabrics such as soy, bamboo and organic cotton and linen Julia cleverly juxtaposes these with recycled polyester which is made from recycled plastic (PET) bottles.

Lara Jacket and Power BodyImage courtesy of Julia Smith

What really sets Julia apart is her second line aptly titled ‘Julia Smith Made in Africa’, which supports lives in Ghana through the vision of Mrs. Marian Essel, a highly skilled batik printer from Ghana, West Africa. Having worked for the Global Mamas in Cape Coast, Marian and Julia Smith have now formed a co-operative in the suburbs of Accra, Ghana’s capital city, offering employment opportunities to the struggling community.

Made in Africa 1Image courtesy of Julia Smith depicting the Made in Africa collection

With Marian using all the proceeds of her work to employ disadvantaged adults as well as sponsoring children so that they can go to school, this is a fantastic initiative which aims to help everyone within the community get the best educational start in life. The ‘Julia Smith Made in Africa’ collection is stocked in Julia’s new flagship store in Marble Arch’s Connaught Village.

borrato

Matt and Nat
Image courtesy of Matt and Nat

A new brand to Amelia’s magazine which is fast becoming a firm favourite is that of Matt & Nat, a pioneering vegan luxury accessories label who create animal free products for both men and women. Interestingly (which I’m hoping you’ll agree) Matt & Nat is not a design duo as the name would suggest but is instead founded by Inder Bedi who was challenged almost 20 years ago to forgo animal products for 30 days. Ever since he has made a conscious effort to use recycled and greener materials in his work steering clear of leather, wool and animal by-products.

commix

Image courtesy of Matt and Nat

For SS10 Matt & Nat are continuing where they left off last season with their 21 water bottles campaign which sees all the linings in their handbags and wallets created using 100% recycled plastic, with each accessory using an average of 21 bottles.

hendrix blueImage courtesy of Matt and Nat

With the inspirations for their SS10 collection being biker chic and glam rock, each bag has been embellished differently with everything from studs to zip details. Made primarily from eel skin (incidentally the softest type of leather I have ever felt,) the colour palette of fiery scarlet, intense blue and blush pink bring a vintage feel to the pieces.

Henrietta Ludgate
A great designer who has already received quite a bit of media attention in 2009 is Henrietta Ludgate, who won the Ethical Fashion Forum ‘Fashion Innovation Award’ earlier in the year. Creating sustainable and sculptural garments from her studio in the remote Highlands of Scotland, Henrietta stays close to her Scotch roots by working primarily with Scottish linen.

4Image courtesy of Henrietta Ludgate

With a brand ethos to support both the Scottish and British textile industry as a whole, all fabrics are sourced from within the British Isles with all pieces produced locally.

image15

A champion of slow fashion, Henrietta’s minimalist silhouette remains hauntingly elegant and distinctive. For inspiration Henrietta often looks to Elsa Schiaparelli, and her vision of fashion as a type of architecture, and beliefs that clothing should be ‘closely connected to the frame of the body’.

image12Image courtesy of Henrietta Ludgate

With the recent opening of a swanky new showroom in London’s Covent Garden, things are looking bright for 2010.
Stay tuned for the second instalment tomorrow…
DAT

French electro ensemble DAT Politics are coming to little old London town to headline the fourth installment of Mofofest this month. Taking place December 12th, treat My Tiger Timing and Bright Light Bright Light are also part of the jam packed line up. Ahead of this rare UK performance from the group, cheapest Politicians Claude and Gaëtan talked to Amelia’s about how their material comes together, this web Mofofest and the perfect DAT Politics party.

France seems to produce the crème de la crème of electro acts, why is this? Is there something in the water?
G: There is definitely a strong connection between electronic music and pop culture in France. It seems to be a historic thing, for at least fifty years the French electronic artists have produced dance music influenced by sound research and pop. Now, it’s a kind of collective spirit, the number of electro acts is massive but the best ones have a specific sound.

DAT Politics have been established for 10 years now, what have been the highlights of your decade in the industry?
G: Maybe our “Plugs Plus” album because it was a decisive step in our career. We switched from instrumental music to electro pop songs with lyrics, verses and a chorus. This choice gave us a lot of freedom and possibilities; it was like opening a new toolbox and breaking the walls in the house. Something very fresh, and the best part is that we’re still working on it!

What new acts excite you?
G: Not that new, but some tracks from Diplo with Rye Rye or Major Lazer are pretty amazing in the fucked up dance music register.

What older acts still have your attention?
C: Daft Punk, Peaches, Sonic youth, Kraftwerk

I’m really interested as to how your songs come together? They seem like they are made in the dark of night? I can’t imagine you work together during the day?
G: Actually, more like late afternoon with the curtains drawn and a pink neon light on.
C: When we decide to work on a new album we meet everyday for several weeks. We build up some tracks together. One comes with an idea for the beats for instance, one the synth lines, one the samples or the vocals. Gaëtan and I write the lyrics. Then we are just the 3 of us in front of the computer trying to assemble each piece. At some point each of us keeps the demo version of the tracks to listen to them and we meet again with new ideas and new material to finish. The process will be the same till we agreed on the final version of the track.

DAT1

What is the most unusual thing that has been used on a track?
G: One time, we used a coffee grinder for a NWA remix, also a talking bird which made some strange sounds. We can use any kind of unusual sources to set a specific atmosphere. It’s like the cherry on the cake but the main part of the track is done with classic electronics like synths and beats.

You obviously use computers a lot, Are you a PC or a Mac?
C: At the beginning, the project was based on laptops’ jamming so several laptops have been through our hands. We’ve been using both. They have the same abilities nowadays. But we’re mainly using Mac which are more stable.

When most people are on computers they get distracted by Facebook, does this happen to you?!
C: Of course, those social networks are easy to get addicted to, but we try to adjust and also concentrate on our activities.

The Artwork/Graphics/Visual side of things are important to you? Where does this come from?
C: We’ve been studying in art school, we are movie freaks, and read a lot of comics as well. Everything is potentially an influence. Our artistic universe is sonic and visual at the same time. It’s hard to imagine one without the other. Since the beginning, we design our own covers, it’s like we know better what fits to our sound, a kind of D.I.Y tradition: have fun with some parallel media like photography, drawings, videos…

DAT3

So you come to London for Mofofest…
C: It ‘s always good to play in London! And we know the girls from Mofofest, their parties are always great !! People always look so trendy! I like that a lot! The London crowd is often very sexy!!

Anything particularly special planned?
C: We’re excited to play “Mad Kit” for the first time in London, we played it many times everywhere else, It went very well, so we expect a lot of positive energy!

Are you excited for the rest of the line up?
C:Yes! always good to discover new bands/acts.

People should defiantly wear their dancing shoes when they come to see you, yes?
C: Of course ! Ballet shoes, sneakers, high heels, moonboots any outfits/shoes they are comfortable in !!

DAT2

How do you prepare for live shows?
C: We have a studio where we rehearse all together till we find the good compromise between the tracks on the album and how we should perform them live.
G: It’s important to set the gear in a space with a real PA and play loud to see how the things are gonna work for the audience during the show.

Where on earth do you find energy for this type of performance?!
C: We are working out a bit. But I guess that the audience is very important too. It really pulls you up! That’s a bit cliché but it’s so nice to see people react to your music!

I can imagine it is not easy to unwind after a live show?
C: That’s a weird feeling because before the show it’s hard to relax, and it’s difficult to appreciate what’s going on… Then we go on and when the show is over and went well, we are usually really high, and ready to party!!

Now for some quick fire party themed questions to find out what a DAT Politics party would be like…
Party song?
C: “Rectangle” from Jacno

Party food?
C: Ceviche

Party city?

C: Berlin / Paris/ Buenos Aires/ London/ Tokyo….

Party game?

C: Hide and Seek

Party drink?

C: Champagne

Party trick?
G: Oddibil (anti-hangover)

Party hat?
C: No hat

Party partner?

C: A good looking and funny young man

Party pants?
C: Shinny tights and high heels boots

Party like a celebrity?

G: I wanna party like Peter Sellers.

You can party with DAT Politics this Saturday at Bardens Boudoir, 38 Stoke Newington Road, Dalston, 8pm – 4am. Click here for more details
Yellow and White mac 008Image courtesy of Christopher Raeburn

Christopher Raeburn
A designer whose name is never far from any eco fashion list is that of Christopher Raeburn, illness who is famed for his high end, pill innovative and functional fashion created using re-appropriated military fabrics. Sourcing his material from de-commissioned military stock and hot-air balloon canvas among other materials Raeburn both redesigns and manufactures his groundbreaking garments ethically within the UK.

PB121954Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

Of his SS10 collection Christopher says: “This season presents a great opportunity to play with colour, look negative space and flowing lines; from its inception I wanted to create an upbeat, fresh and experimental collection.”
With the emphasis on rouching, contrasting geometric panels and colourful taped seams Raeburn utilises laser cutting techniques for the first time introducing repeat patterns of concentric circle cut-outs which are peppered throughout the collection cleverly hidden between panels and layered hoods and sleeves.

Parachute dress

Image courtesy of Christopher Raeburn

What is most striking about Raeburn’s new contemporary collection of dresses, ponchos, skirts and macs is how well his colour palette and themes work together with layer, light and silhouette being the main focuses. With the majority of fabric used being transparent it is Raeburn’s bright accents of colour and playful dots that really inject life into the garments, and are reminiscent of jellyfish.

Purple and White Jacket with matching bag 006

Image courtesy of Christopher Raeburn

Rather excitingly the new collection also features accessories for the first time, with Raeburn fusing woven netting with his trademark parachute fabric and cord to great effect adding to the high impact of this super functional range.

Lu FluxPB121959Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

Another exciting designer who we’re predicting big things for next year is the lovely Lu Flux; who has just launched her debut collection after being named ‘London’s newest one to watch’ at Vauxhall Fashion Scout earlier in the year. What sets Lu’s designs apart is that her work is created using salvaged, vintage and organic fabrics, which she cleverly combines with traditional techniques such as knitting, pleating and patchwork.

PB121960Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

Lu’s witty and playful SS10 collection titled ‘The Eco Life of Riley’ is inspired by the ‘humble bluetit’ which is cleverly juxtaposed with bold jarring graphics throughout the collection. If developing her own eco brand wasn’t enough of a challenge Lu is also busy working on a project called Soko Kenya, which was conceived over two years ago when she visited the small coastal town of Ukunda in Kenya. The idea behind this project is to work in conjunction with local Kenyan tailors who attend the community owned Ukunda Youth Polytechnic, which offers basic vocational training to local residents at a low cost.

PB121962Image courtesy of Rachael Oku

This collaboration will see Soko invest a minimum of 5% gross earnings into the Polytechnic annually in addition to year-round fundraising to help acquire sewing machines and other essential equipment for the students. Additionally Soko are committed to providing support in the design and running of the Polytechnic’s existing tailoring department and syllabus according to international fair-trade and eco production standards.

PB121961Image courtesy of Rachael Oku depicting Soko Kenya products

Most importantly both parties are committed to working together to transform the Polytechnic into an eco institution by introducing a rainwater catchment system and working to create solar generated electricity. To find out more about this great project and where to buy Soko Kenya products head to their website.

Apron Dress and BodysuitImage courtesy of Julia Smith

Julia Smith
Another groundbreaking designer who caught our attention was Julia Smith, a designer who has graced the webpages of Amelia’s magazine a few times previously. Julia’s SS10 collection entitled ‘Nurture Me’ explores the idea of mixing beauty with function. Part inspired by the 1930′s and 1940′s, when loose shapes and function were paramount Julia’s collection also references the concept of underwear as outerwear. Created using tactile fabrics such as soy, bamboo and organic cotton and linen Julia cleverly juxtaposes these with recycled polyester which is made from recycled plastic (PET) bottles.

Lara Jacket and Power BodyImage courtesy of Julia Smith

What really sets Julia apart is her second line aptly titled ‘Julia Smith Made in Africa’, which supports lives in Ghana through the vision of Mrs. Marian Essel, a highly skilled batik printer from Ghana, West Africa. Having worked for the Global Mamas in Cape Coast, Marian and Julia Smith have now formed a co-operative in the suburbs of Accra, Ghana’s capital city, offering employment opportunities to the struggling community.

Made in Africa 1Image courtesy of Julia Smith depicting the Made in Africa collection

With Marian using all the proceeds of her work to employ disadvantaged adults as well as sponsoring children so that they can go to school, this is a fantastic initiative which aims to help everyone within the community get the best educational start in life. The ‘Julia Smith Made in Africa’ collection is stocked in Julia’s new flagship store in Marble Arch’s Connaught Village.

borrato

Matt and Nat
Image courtesy of Matt and Nat

A new brand to Amelia’s magazine which is fast becoming a firm favourite is that of Matt & Nat, a pioneering vegan luxury accessories label who create animal free products for both men and women. Interestingly (which I’m hoping you’ll agree) Matt & Nat is not a design duo as the name would suggest but is instead founded by Inder Bedi who was challenged almost 20 years ago to forgo animal products for 30 days. Ever since he has made a conscious effort to use recycled and greener materials in his work steering clear of leather, wool and animal by-products.

commix

Image courtesy of Matt and Nat

For SS10 Matt & Nat are continuing where they left off last season with their 21 water bottles campaign which sees all the linings in their handbags and wallets created using 100% recycled plastic, with each accessory using an average of 21 bottles.

hendrix blueImage courtesy of Matt and Nat

With the inspirations for their SS10 collection being biker chic and glam rock, each bag has been embellished differently with everything from studs to zip details. Made primarily from eel skin (incidentally the softest type of leather I have ever felt,) the colour palette of fiery scarlet, intense blue and blush pink bring a vintage feel to the pieces.

Henrietta Ludgate
A great designer who has already received quite a bit of media attention in 2009 is Henrietta Ludgate, who won the Ethical Fashion Forum ‘Fashion Innovation Award’ earlier in the year. Creating sustainable and sculptural garments from her studio in the remote Highlands of Scotland, Henrietta stays close to her Scotch roots by working primarily with Scottish linen.

4    Image courtesy of Henrietta Ludgate

With a brand ethos to support both the Scottish and British textile industry as a whole, all fabrics are sourced from within the British Isles with all pieces produced locally.

image15

A champion of slow fashion, Henrietta’s minimalist silhouette remains hauntingly elegant and distinctive. For inspiration Henrietta often looks to Elsa Schiaparelli, and her vision of fashion as a type of architecture, and beliefs that clothing should be ‘closely connected to the frame of the body’.

image12Image courtesy of Henrietta Ludgate

With the recent opening of a swanky new showroom in London’s Covent Garden, things are looking bright for 2010.
Stay tuned for the second instalment tomorrow…

People crowding into Concrete Hermit for my launch party

The super busy Concrete Hermit at my Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration book launch


So, approved last night was party night… and after months of very little sleep it was time to celebrate the official launch of my first book. Hurrah! Concrete Hermit very kindly offered to host the launch and I decided it would be nice to daub their walls with a some of the renewable technologies imagined by illustrators in the book, dosage so Sunday was spent bombing between Climate Camp in Trafalgar Square and sort of overseeing how the collaboration went (which featured contributions from Saffron Stocker, price  Craig YameyHannah LewisLiv BargmanChris CoxBarbara Ana GomezJess WilsonLeona ClarkeKarolin Schnoorand Andrew Merritt) but mainly involved me gobbling cheese and humous sandwiches and not being very helpful at all.

Super busy outside Concrete Hermit: thank god it didn't rain!

Super busy outside Concrete Hermit: thank god it didn’t rain!

Thanks to the power of twitter I managed to secure some booze sponsorship at the last minute (you know how crazy people talk about sending your wishes out into the universe by writing notes to angels and the suchlike – well with twitter it actually works, people listen!) A lovely lady heard my plea and offered me the best beer ever – Adnams East Green carbon neutral ale, which was really delightful and the perfect accompaniment to the evening. We also got another sponsorship at the last minute – a yummy New Zealand beer – which as some helpful friend of mine pointed out probably totally wrote off all our smug carbon neutral credentials in one feel swoop. Oh well!

Checking out Amelia's Anthology of Illustration

Checking out Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration

I arrived a wee bit late, as I am wont to do (took me ages to do my make up – I decided on a glitter-on-eyelashes look at the last minute which was fun to achieve) and the place was already hopping. It remained fairly rammed both inside and out for the entire stretch of night, and I felt less stressed than I normally do at such occasions, possibly because many of my good friends did actually come along – which has been a rarity at most recent magazine launch parties. And I am generally in a better mood these days, what with heartbreak being quite a long way away (3 years; I know, it takes me awhile) As well there were loads of other lovely folks – many of whom I didn’t know, and lots of the featured illustrators came along with friends and family, or alone, as did uber-typologist and endpaper queen Lesley Barnes – who travelled all the way down from Scotland on the train for the event.

Lesley Barnes and Amelia Gregory, with Valerie Pezeron filming in the background

Lesley Barnes and Amelia Gregory, with Valerie Pezeron filming in the background


My parents came (who were massively helpful during the making of the book – my father having researched all the technologies, and my mother having subbed all the writing from their caravan whilst on holiday in New Zealand) and my cousin Camilla, though my cousin Matt who works at RBS didn’t – he sent a text message saying “Amelia hates me because I work for the most evil bank in the world.” Haha! No I don’t!

But you really should change jobs.

Checking out the book: Amelia's Anthology of Illustration

Checking out the book: Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration

To be honest it was all a bit of a whirl, so I think I’ll just leave you with a bunch of photos to tell the story better than I can. We ended the night at that artists’ favourite (and mine, for the ten years I have lived in the area) The Owl and Pussycat, just around the corner in Redchurch Street, and a fabulous time was had by all, including my trusty interns Jermaine and Grace, who did a sterling job keeping the place clean and clearing away the bottles – it was my biggest fear that they would get broken and mashed into the pavement like they oft times are during gallery openings in the area. Valerie is working on a little video of the whole thing, so watch out for that in the coming weeks. In the meantime, enjoy! It were like a proper book launch, with books laid out on the table and everyfink. Get me!

Satu Fox and Sally Mumby-Croft, who helped with interviews in the book

Satu Fox and Sally Mumby-Croft, who helped with interviews in the book

Craig Yamey, featured in Amelia's Anthology of Illustration

Craig Yamey, featured in Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration

with my parents and cousin

with my parents and cousin

Andrew Merritt

Andrew Merritt

Fred Butler and friends, looking as fabulous as ever

Fred Butler and friends, looking as fabulous as ever

Amelia Gregory, with featured illustrators Barbara Ana Gomez and Thereza Rowe

Amelia Gregory, with featured illustrators Barbara Ana Gomez and Thereza Rowe

Leona Clarke with her brother, also an illustrator!

Leona Clarke with her brother, also an illustrator!

Sabrina Morrison and Cari Steel (star interns who helped with the book) and Jermaine Gallacher

Sabrina Morrison, Cari Steel and Jermaine Gallacher (star interns who helped with the book)

Amelia Gregory and Craig Yamey, one of the most lovely people I know

me and Craig Yamey, one of the most lovely people I know

A proper launch for Amelia's Anthology of Illustration

A proper launch for Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration

My friend Jamie Rory Lucy on the floor at the end of the night - look how much we drunk!

My friend Jamie Rory Lucy on the floor at the end of the night – look how much we drunk!


Categories ,Amelia Gregory, ,Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration, ,Barbara Ana Gomez, ,Concrete Hermit, ,Craig Yamey, ,exhibition, ,launch party, ,Lesley Barnes, ,Thereza Rowe

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Amelia’s Magazine | Glastonbury 2010 Climate Camp Tripod Stage Review: Saturday

Illustration by Dan Heffer, what is ed Hat by Angela Bruce

Around the monolithic event that is Graduate Fashion Week at Earl’s Court, there exists what might be known as satellite events. This is no way refers to the quality of work that is on display only to the difference in size between shows. I was lucky enough to visit the millenary on show at Kensington and Chelsea College’s end of year show.

I’m not sure whether it’s the wedding’s I’ve been too recently or the constant press attention regarding the ladies hats at certain races (hello Ainscourt) but recently I’ve been paying more attention to headwear.

Illustration by Lauren

The quality of the work on display was unmistakable and a joy to photograph through the sculpture shapes. Each Milliner had created a story around their final product, some of the topics covered envoked narcassim, Alice in Wonderland

Illustration by Rachael

to old myths and Legends.

Illustration by Krister Selin, Hat by Anna Pulley

Hat by Kate Underdown

Hat by Anna Pulleyn

Photographs by Sally Mumby-Croft

Illustration by Dan Heffer, ampoule Hat by Angela Bruce

Around the monolithic event that is Graduate Fashion Week at Earl’s Court, medications there exists what might be known as satellite events. This is no way refers to the quality of work that is on display only to the difference in size between shows. I was lucky enough to visit the millenary on show at Kensington and Chelsea College’s end of year show.

I’m not sure whether it’s the wedding’s I’ve been too recently or the constant press attention regarding the ladies hats at certain races (hello Ainscourt) but recently I’ve been paying more attention to headwear.

Illustration by Lauren

The quality of the work on display was unmistakable and a joy to photograph through the sculpture shapes. Each Milliner had created a story around their final product, cheap some of the topics covered envoked narcassim, Alice in Wonderland

Illustration by Rachael

to old myths and Legends.

Illustration by Charlotte Gibson, Hat by Kate Underdown

Hat by Anna Pulleyn

Illustration by Krister Selin, Hat by Anna Pulley

Photographs by Sally Mumby-Croft

Illustration by Dan Heffer, viagra 100mg Hat by Angela Bruce

Around the monolithic event that is Graduate Fashion Week at Earl’s Court, recipe there exists what might be known as satellite events. This is no way refers to the quality of work that is on display only to the difference in size between shows. I was lucky enough to visit the millenary on show at Kensington and Chelsea College’s end of year show.

I’m not sure whether it’s the wedding’s I’ve been too recently or the constant press attention regarding the ladies hats at certain races (hello Ainscourt) but recently I’ve been paying more attention to headwear.

Illustration by Lauren

The quality of the work on display was unmistakable and a joy to photograph through the sculpture shapes. Each Milliner had created a story around their final product, some of the topics covered envoked narcassim, Alice in Wonderland

to old myths and Legends.

Illustration by Krister Selin, Hat by Anna Pulley

Illustration by Charlotte Gibson, Hat by Kate Underdown

Hat by Anna Pulleyn

Illustration by Rachael

Photographs by Sally Mumby-Croft

Illustration by Dan Heffer, pills Hat by Angela Bruce

Around the monolithic event that is Graduate Fashion Week at Earl’s Court, salve there exists what might be known as satellite events. This is no way refers to the quality of work that is on display only to the difference in size between shows. I was lucky enough to visit the millenary on show at Kensington and Chelsea College’s end of year show.

I’m not sure whether it’s the wedding’s I’ve been too recently or the constant press attention regarding the ladies hats at certain races (hello Ainscourt) but recently I’ve been paying more attention to headwear.

Illustration by Lauren

The quality of the work on display was unmistakable and a joy to photograph through the sculpture shapes. Each Milliner had created a story around their final product, some of the topics covered envoked narcassim, Alice in Wonderland

Illustration by Rachael

to old myths and Legends.

Illustration by Krister Selin, Hat by Anna Pulley

Hat by Kate Underdown

Illustration by Charlotte Gibson

Hat by Anna Pulleyn

Photographs by Sally Mumby-Croft

June Chanpoomidole-Get Cape. Wear Cape. Fly.
Get Cape. Wear Cape. Fly. by June Chanpoomidole.

Our Saturday starter was none other than Sam Duckworth of Get Cape. Wear Cape. Fly. who changed his stage time so that he could watch the ill-fated England match on Sunday. Those Climate Campers who knew him were suitably excited and soon stood on the corner of the Craft Field with the megaphone. It’s amazing what a big name does… the festival goers were soon flooding into our small area, more about slightly disbelieving that our wee stage could be hosting such a well known musician.

Glastonbury 2010 Climate Camp Get Cape. Wear Cape. Fly

Meanwhile I stood slightly panicked on the entrance as the minutes slowly ticked by… and then Sam came ambling down the leafy rise, slightly late having come straight from taking part in a debate about the rise of the BNP at the Leftfield Stage. A more mild mannered and charming young man you would be hard to come by, but Sam’s grasp of how important it is to speak out against the ills of this world is admirable. Without undue ceremony he was soon aboard the Tripod Stage, holding a borrowed acoustic guitar. “Can you all hear me? I’ve got a big voice so I can sing louder!”

Glastonbury 2010 Climate Camp Get Cape. Wear Cape. Fly
Glastonbury 2010 Climate Camp Get Cape. Wear Cape. Fly
Glastonbury 2010 Climate Camp Get Cape. Wear Cape. Fly

Sunglassed against the blazing heat Sam sung new songs from his upcoming album alongside old crowd pleasers such as One More With Feeling. Unbidden he spoke with passion of meeting a Bangladeshi woman who had lost her family as a direct result of the effects of climate change, and how important it is to stand up to the big corporations. A truly special young man who has been off my radar for awhile, I now remember why I featured Get Cape. Wear Cape. Fly. in Amelia’s Magazine all those years ago. What a star. Sam’s new single Collapsing Cities is out in August, followed by a 22 date tour in September and October.

Kyla La Grange by Barbara Ana Gomez
Kyla La Grange by Barbara Ana Gomez.

Next up we had Kyla La Grange, a beautiful girl with a stunning voice (does it matter that she was beautiful? It shouldn’t, but she really was, what can I say? And talented…) She arrived without fanfare and I found her practicing behind our van on the same acoustic guitar that Sam had borrowed.

Glastonbury 2010 Climate Camp Kyla La Grange

This was the first time in awhile that the husky voiced Kyla had played her songs without added production but she’s an accomplished songwriter and songs like the catchy single Vampire Smile worked just as well without backing. Definitely a talent to watch: her debut album is currently in production.

Glastonbury 2010 Climate Camp Kyla La Grange

Kyla’s favourite bits of Glastonbury: Arcadia was absolutely brilliant but as far as performances go it was a tie between Laura Marling and Florence and the Machine. They were both faultless.

colin-stewart-patch-william
colin-stewart-patch-william
Patch William by Colin Stewart.

Patch William were another band we shared with the BBC Introducing stage (or should that be the other way around). They arrived complete with their own recording facilities, although I will hopefully attempt to cobble together some of the footage I shot myself (oh Final Cut Pro, how I yearn to learn your charms).

Glastonbury 2010 Climate Camp Kyla La Grange

Fronted by William and his god sister Ali, Patch William braved the blazing heat dressed as if they had just stepped out of a fairytale, all flowing hair, wide trousers and Ali crowned in a flower garland so beloved of festival goers this year. Their melodic harmonies were perfect for a lazy summer day such as this, and culminated in the Ivor Novello nominated The Last Bus, a stunning song that saw Ali nimbly swap from guitar to cello. Just gorgeous.

Patch William liked playing the Tripod Stage because: It was great to be able to play a set which was powered solely by a solar panel! 
Patch William’s favourite bits of Glastonbury: Discovering a naked mermaid at Shangri La and being able to say ‘hello glastonbury’ during our set (something which we’d only dreamed of before).

Patch William play the Firefly Music Festival and Belladrum Festival in Scotland. Their next single release will be Skinny White Boy and they plan to go on tour in September. Watch their set at BBC Introducing here.

Glastonbury 2010 Climate Camp Patch William

Then we were supposed to host The Federals, but unfortunately some misunderstood information meant that they hadn’t come prepared for our particular stage set up and all I got was this picture.

Glastonbury 2010 Climate Camp The Federals

Oh well! You win some you lose some: they seemed like nice lads, and went on to play, yes, you’ve guessed it, the BBC Introducing stage. Instead we had a bit of a gap before an exclusive secret set from the wonderful Robin Ince… who turned up a good hour early so we all sat around having a cup of tea and a chinwag.

Abi Daker - Robin Ince - Glastonbury
Robin Ince by Abigail Daker.

Robin was determined to perform his set back to front, so I would be introducing him after he’d finished, and Danny Chivers could come on as a warm up act at the end. This meant that Robin also started sat on the floor with his back to the audience. To another disbelieving crowd – “Yes, we really do have Robin Ince performing here in a minute” – Robin gave a brilliant performance that touched on themes of favourite suicides, the use of jazz hands in the popularisation of science and banality in politics.

Glastonbury 2010 Climate Camp Robin Ince

I’ve uploaded part of his performance for your delection here:

At the end he called on me to come up and introduce him, but then carried on heckling me from the floor. Can anyone tell me, did he do his gig in the Comedy Tent during the England match on Sunday dressed as an octopus? Muchos love going out to you Robin.

dry-the-river-by Lisa Stannard
Dry the River by Lisa Stannard.

Last but by no means least the Tripod Stage was delighted to host Dry the River, a folk band from East London attired in vaguely matched check shirts. Accompanied by guitar, bass, violin, glockenspiel and snare drum, Dry the River sing of history, culture, religion – often in gorgeous four part falsetto boy harmonies. Lead singer Peter Liddle studied anthropology and is now en route to become a doctor; a background that clearly informs his unusual lyrics. If there is any sense in this world Dry the River will be a major success: in fact if I were the betting kind I would lay the notes down hand over fist for this unsigned band. Really really brilliant, I feel so blessed to have found them.

Glastonbury 2010 Climate Camp Dry the River
dry-the-river-by Lisa Stannard
Glastonbury 2010 Climate Camp Dry the River
dry-the-river-by Lisa Stannard
Dry the River by Lisa Stannard.

I asked bearded bassist Scott to answer a few questions:

Scott’s feelings on the Tripod Stage gig: The Climate Camp Tripod Stage was awesome! We played as the sunshine beamed down on our faces, and the people around were so laid back and friendly. Plus we all got a cup of tea while we played which was like a dream after two days of camping. We even got a chance to road-test a new tune we’ve been working on because of the relaxed atmosphere of the show, and it went down well!
 
Scott’s favourite part of Glastonbury: It’s tough to pick a ‘best bit’ for the whole weekend but for me heading out to get lost in the maze of Shangri La at night was amazing, and bumping into Neville Staple backstage in the Dance Arena was pretty cool. Obviously the gigs we were able to play while we were there all stand out too, the Climate Camp for the friendly hospitable people there, the Crow’s Nest for the amazing view of the whole festival at sunset and of course the BBC Introducing set was just so exciting with the cameras and everything.

Glastonbury 2010 Climate Camp Dry the River
Glastonbury 2010 Climate Camp Dry the River

Make sure you catch up with Dry the River live – they’re playing Standon Calling, the Big Chill and Underground Festival in Gloucester. You can download a FREE 3 track EP from their myspace which includes an unreleased version of Coast, a never before heard track recorded earlier this summer. Dry the River headline the Lexington on September 30th and you can buy tickets here. In the meantime see them on BBC Introducing here.

Read on here for the Tripod Stage Sunday review.

Categories ,Abigail Daker, ,Barbara Ana Gomez, ,BBC Introducing, ,Belladrum Festival, ,Climate Camp, ,Colin Stewart, ,Comedy Tent, ,Crow’s Nest, ,Dance Arena, ,Danny Chivers, ,Dry the River, ,Firefly Music Festival, ,Florence and The Machine, ,Get Cape. Wear Cape. Fly., ,glastonbury, ,June Chanpoomidole, ,Kyla la Grange, ,Lisa Stannard, ,Neville Staple, ,Patch William, ,Robin Ince, ,Sam Duckworth, ,Shangri La, ,Tripod Stage

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