Amelia’s Magazine | Orla Kiely: London Fashion Week A/W 2013 Presentation Review


Orla Kiely A/W 2013 by Laura Hickman

Ireland’s Orla Kiely has firmly established her eponymous London label over the seasons with 1960s silhouettes, playful prints and rich fabrics. While the look book each season is never going to shock or win any awards for pushing the boundaries of fashion, style fans head to Orla for staple vintage pieces that are playful and pretty. But to judge Orla against the likes of Azzedine Alaïa or Hussein Chalayan would be missing the point. Always a nod to decades past, previous presentations have included film screenings directed by Gia Coppola and Mercedes Helnwein.


All photography by Matt Bramford

This season’s presentation took place in the intriguing Elms Lesters Painting Rooms, a gallery off Denmark Street that often hosts fashion press days; its labyrinth of rooms lend themselves well to presentations of this nature. A long arm of the upper floor had been transformed into a retro working-girl’s space that could have been lifted straight from a scene from Mad Men or working-class hero flick Made in Dagenham.


Orla Kiely A/W 2013 by Dom&Ink

Numerous models appeared at the entrance to the elongated space wearing this season’s take on Orla’s signature looks, as an unobtrusive soundtrack made up mostly of the clatter of a typewriter played. Beehive barnets piled high atop models’ heads. Orla’s girls were superbly cast, more as actresses than runway models: loading typewriters, filing paperwork, nattering quietly and changing ‘shifts’ regularly to allow other models to enter the showcase.


Orla Kiely A/W 2013 by Laura Hickman

Attention to detail was key, with design perverts like me eyeing up mid-century Scandinavian furniture, Smiths‘ clocks and old graphic signage as much as the outfits themselves.

Statement features this season include high-waisted dresses with girly a-line hems, flocked coats with swirling patterns, pleated and pointed collars, embroidered squirrels and a-line overcoats using Orla Kiely‘s signature shape.


Orla Kiely A/W 2013 by Dom&Ink

This kind of thoughtful, preciously executed presentation is the way forward. With never-ending developments in technology and record numbers at catwalk shows, presentations allow you to fully gage the nuances of collections and document them effectively, rather than the scramble to photograph, tweet, Facebook, Vine, MySpace, tumblr, Foursquare and Grindr your way through a catwalk show.


Orla Kiely A/W 2013 by Laura Hickman

Another infinitely wearable collection that will satisfy the label’s fans en masse.

Categories ,1950s, ,1960s, ,A/W 2013, ,A/W’13, ,beehive, ,Dom&Ink, ,Elms Lesters Painting Rooms, ,ireland, ,Laura Hickman, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Mad Men, ,Made in Dagenham, ,Matt Bramford, ,Orla Kiely, ,Presentation, ,review, ,Smiths clocks, ,vintage

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Bernard Chandran


Bernard Chandran S/S 2012, capsule illustrated by Gabriel Ayala

I feel like myself and Bernard Chandran are good pals. He’d probably see it differently, but the first show I ever saw during a fashion week was his, and since then I haven’t missed a single one. I almost did this time – cruelly his show clashed with one of my other favourites, Jean Pierre Braganza. I was worried sick – who would I choose? In the end, the Amelia’s Magazine team had got JPB more than covered and I decided that I couldn’t miss Bernard after all.


Bernard Chandran S/S 2012, illustrated by Cruz

It’s a bloody good job I was so desperate to see it, because his show was at the Il Bottaccio venue on Grosvenor Place. If this doesn’t mean anything to you, it’s basically a 20 minute cycle by Boris from Somerset House, fashion week’s epicentre. It might not sound much, but when you’ve got less than twenty minutes to get there, it’s boiling hot on the Strand and rammed with buses churning emissions in your face and you’re prone to perspiration, it’s less than entirely ideal.






All photography by Matt Bramford

I arrived at the venue in a complete state. Perspiring, thirsty, hungry and miserable, I just wanted to get inside and get it over with. Luckily entrance was a breeze, and I found a good seat on which to waft my invite frantically and avoid glares from immaculate fashionos free of any perspiration. I sat next to Lida from The First To Know – I’ve spoken to her electronically a few times, and it was great to finally meet her. We chatted about a recent article of hers for the Ecologist where she speaks to Chandran about the lack of available craftsmanship in our country, and it’s definitely worth a read.


Bernard Chandran S/S 2012, illustrated by Gabriel Ayala

Bernard’s invite featured a duplicated picture of a glamorous woman from the 1950s. I had already guessed (naturally, as myself and Bernard are so friendly) that it was his mother. She had the same delicate bone structure and exotic appeal. It turns out that these two subjects – the 1950s and the matriarch of the Chandran dynasty – where Bernard’s inspiration this season.





The show featured many of Bernard’s now signature styles, but this time he’d cranked up the glamour factor and it really suited his unique dedication to sculpture and proportion.


Bernard Chandran S/S 2012, illustrated by Cruz

Look after look brought glamour, sophistication, elegant craftsmanship and a unique approach to dynamic cutting. Floor-length silk numbers, beautifully simple, sat happily with futuristic blazers with angular oversized lapels and a-line dresses with feather panels. The colour palette was a varied as it could be – pale pinks and blues, gold, silver, and vivid cobalt and fuchsia. Chandran’s evident bravery in his use of colour was a dominant feature once again.

It was quite a mix, and that’s what I quite like about Chandran; you can’t label his collections with this season’s buzz words and you could try to squeeze him into a box but he’ll burst out of it, wearing feathers and glittered fabrics and assymetric cuts (metapohrically speaking, of course).





The finale brought a stunning black model onto the catwalk wearing a red-carpet finest – a dazzling body-con number with a sweetheart neckline and a fishtail train. Delicate petal shapes in a complimentary colour had been applied all over the frock, teamed with high-gloss evening gloves. The model glided past us oozing sex appeal with a look of confidence that only this sort of piece can give.





Bernard, you didn’t let me down. Until next time, pal…

Categories ,1950s, ,Bernard Chandran, ,Boris Bikes, ,catwalk, ,Cruz, ,Feathers, ,First To Know, ,Front Row, ,Gabriel Ayala, ,Glamour, ,Glitter, ,Grosvenor Place, ,Il Bottaccio, ,Lida Hujic, ,London Fashion Week, ,Off Schedule, ,Pop PR, ,review, ,S/S 2012, ,Sweat, ,the ecologist, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Presentation Review: Rachel Freire


Aiming to promote recent graduates onto a more commercially viable platform, information pills Fashion Mode launched this September with a show on the 19th September amid a lot of glitzy PR and press releases. The initiative is aiming ‘to bring back cutting edge fashion to London’, page enabling our ‘young fledgling designers…to be cultivated, supported and cherished’. Aside from this rather slushy blurb surrounding it, the ensuing show was enjoyable and a few gems were sent down the catwalk. Celeb top spot of the week must go to Nick Knowles of DIY SOS fame, who turned up with a man wearing a huge paper sock hat on his head. If anyone can shed any light on this guy, I would be so happy to find out more.

First onto the runway was Carlotta Actis Barone with a collection that reminded me of the kind of clothes clichéd royals in storybooks wear. Dark dramatic reds, with big shoulders and lots of dangly bits hanging off, the collection featured draped and knotted dresses, plus work style dungarees. The hair, which usually passes me by on the catwalk, was amazing (up do’s with lots of boof) so congrats must go to Toni and Guy who styled the whole event.


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyren

The Wear My Skin collection is based on the fight against racism and the clothes attempt to represent workers clothes on the plantation fields. The skin element is portrayed using scribbled-print, black-and-white body con dresses, polo necks and leggings under all of the garments. A bit like those sleeves you buy when you want to look like you have a tattoo but an interesting way of pulling together collection none the less.
Next out was James Hillman, who based his collection on the 59 Bike Club, Teddy Boy look and a desire for simplicity. I will remember it for different reasons: the poor model who had to walk down the runway in a see through dress, the adorable grandma bursting with pride as her grandson (not in a see through dress) walked down the catwalk, and the stifling heat taking hold of the hall. NB Most people had picked up fans from the previous show and were fine…not me though.


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyren

His collection was very neutral and very beige/grey/brown. The use of fabrics generally reserved for womenswear was a promising idea but wasn’t used to a great effect. The semi-opaque trousers and jacket/dress were fun but I expected more from someone who defines themselves on their use of simplicity, tailoring and well styled masculinity. I did however, love the army boots which were worn with every outfit including the smarter tailored suits.


Illustration by Gareth A Hopkins

Elson Figueiredo is inspired by 19th century European carnies and uses 100% organic fair-trade cottons. He presented a really strong collection with nicely tailored jackets, mid length coats and loose fit chino-esque trousers. His self-description of ‘quirky and distinctive’ is perfect. The jackets are well cut and the added elbow pads and red edgings on pockets and lapels were definitely a bonus for me in terms of well added details.


The black and blue hooded jacket worn with navy sloucy trousers was the highlight of the show for me, and slightly different from all of the other pieces he sent down the runway.

The star of the show (kept till last) was Florian Jayet. I really enjoyed his collection and many influences were prevalent in his styling – he interned with Alexander McQueen. Jayet’s S/S 2011 collection is inspired by insects and garments as armour style garments.

Using metallic fabrics and leather, his robust exoskeleton pieces are often softened with a long draped skirt or a flimsy top. Also, again with the noticing of the hair, I like the sharp pulled back ponytails sported by all the models.



Ones to watch are definitely Figueiredo and Jayet. They presented collections with distinctive yet restrained looks rather than over designing pieces a la River Island chic.


Aiming to promote recent graduates onto a more commercially viable platform, sale Fashion Mode launched this September with a show on the 19th amid a lot of glitzy PR and press releases. The initiative is aiming ‘to bring back cutting edge fashion to London’, link enabling our ‘young fledgling designers…to be cultivated, supported and cherished’. Aside from this rather slushy blurb surrounding it, the ensuing show was enjoyable and a few gems were sent down the catwalk. Celeb top spot of the day must go to Nick Knowles of DIY SOS fame, who turned up with a man wearing a huge paper sock hat on his head. If anyone can shed any light on this guy, I would be so happy to find out more.


See background for ‘man in hat’ with Nick Knowles

First onto the runway was Carlotta Actis Barone with a collection that reminded me of the kind of clothes clichéd royals in storybooks wear. Dark dramatic reds, with big shoulders and lots of dangly bits hanging off, the collection featured draped and knotted dresses, plus work style dungarees. The hair, which usually passes me by on the catwalk, was amazing (up do’s with lots of boof) so congrats must go to Toni and Guy who styled the whole event.


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyren

The Wear My Skin collection is based on the fight against racism and the clothes attempt to represent workers clothes on the plantation fields. The skin element is portrayed using scribbled-print, black-and-white body con dresses, polo necks and leggings under all of the garments. A bit like those sleeves you buy when you want to look like you have a tattoo but an interesting way of pulling together collection none the less.

Next out was James Hillman, who based his collection on the 59 Bike Club, Teddy Boy look and a desire for simplicity. I will remember it for different reasons: the poor model who had to walk down the runway in a see through dress, the adorable grandma bursting with pride as her grandson (not in a see through dress) walked down the catwalk, and the stifling heat taking hold of the hall. NB Most people had picked up fans from the previous show and were fine…not me though.


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyren

His collection was very neutral and very beige/grey/brown. The use of fabrics generally reserved for womenswear was a promising idea but wasn’t used to a great effect. The semi-opaque trousers and jacket/dress were fun but I expected more from someone who defines themselves on their use of simplicity, tailoring and well styled masculinity. I did however, love the army boots which were worn with every outfit including the smarter tailored suits.


Illustration by Gareth A Hopkins

Elson Figueiredo is inspired by 19th century European carnies and uses 100% organic fair-trade cottons. He presented a really strong collection with nicely tailored jackets, mid length coats and loose fit chino-esque trousers. His self-description of ‘quirky and distinctive’ is perfect. The jackets are well cut and the added elbow pads and red edgings on pockets and lapels were definitely a bonus for me in terms of well added details.


The beige knee length coat worn with characteristic edging details was the highlight of the show for me, and slightly different from all of the other pieces he sent down the runway.

The star of the show (kept till last) was Florian Jayet. I really enjoyed his collection and many influences were prevalent in his styling – he interned with Alexander McQueen. Jayet’s S/S 2011 collection is inspired by insects and garments as armour style garments.

Using metallic fabrics and leather, his robust exoskeleton pieces are often softened with a long draped skirt or a flimsy top. Also, again with the noticing of the hair, I like the sharp pulled back ponytails sported by all the models.


My ones to watch are definitely Figueiredo and Jayet. They presented collections with distinctive yet restrained looks rather than over designing pieces a la River Island chic.


Aiming to promote recent graduates onto a more commercially viable platform, decease Fashion Mode launched this September with a show on the 19th amid a lot of glitzy PR and press releases. The initiative is aiming ‘to bring back cutting edge fashion to London’, viagra buy enabling our ‘young fledgling designers…to be cultivated, approved supported and cherished’. Aside from this rather slushy blurb surrounding it, the ensuing show was enjoyable and a few gems were sent down the catwalk. Celeb top spot of the day must go to Nick Knowles of DIY SOS fame, who turned up with a man wearing a huge paper sock hat on his head. If anyone can shed any light on this guy, I would be so happy to find out more.


See background for ‘man in hat’ with Nick Knowles

First onto the runway was Carlotta Actis Barone with a collection that reminded me of the kind of clothes clichéd royals in storybooks wear. Dark dramatic reds, with big shoulders and lots of dangly bits hanging off, the collection featured draped and knotted dresses, plus work style dungarees. The hair, which usually passes me by on the catwalk, was amazing (up do’s with lots of boof) so congrats must go to Toni and Guy who styled the whole event.


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyren

The Wear My Skin collection is based on the fight against racism and the clothes attempt to represent workers clothes on the plantation fields. The skin element is portrayed using scribbled-print, black-and-white body con dresses, polo necks and leggings under all of the garments. A bit like those sleeves you buy when you want to look like you have a tattoo but an interesting way of pulling together collection none the less.

Next out was James Hillman, who based his collection on the 59 Bike Club, Teddy Boy look and a desire for simplicity. I will remember it for different reasons: the poor model who had to walk down the runway in a see through dress, the adorable grandma bursting with pride as her grandson (not in a see through dress) walked down the catwalk, and the stifling heat taking hold of the hall. NB Most people had picked up fans from the previous show and were fine…not me though.


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyren

His collection was very neutral and very beige/grey/brown. The use of fabrics generally reserved for womenswear was a promising idea but wasn’t used to a great effect. The semi-opaque trousers and jacket/dress were fun but I expected more from someone who defines themselves on their use of simplicity, tailoring and well styled masculinity. I did however, love the army boots which were worn with every outfit including the smarter tailored suits.


Illustration by Gareth A Hopkins

Elson Figueiredo is inspired by 19th century European carnies and uses 100% organic fair-trade cottons. He presented a really strong collection with nicely tailored jackets, mid length coats and loose fit chino-esque trousers. His self-description of ‘quirky and distinctive’ is perfect. The jackets are well cut and the added elbow pads and red edgings on pockets and lapels were definitely a bonus for me in terms of well added details.


The beige knee length coat worn with characteristic edging details was the highlight of the show for me, and slightly different from all of the other pieces he sent down the runway.

The star of the show (kept till last) was Florian Jayet. I really enjoyed his collection and many influences were prevalent in his styling – he interned with Alexander McQueen. Jayet’s S/S 2011 collection is inspired by insects and garments as armour style garments.

Using metallic fabrics and leather, his robust exoskeleton pieces are often softened with a long draped skirt or a flimsy top. Also, again with the noticing of the hair, I like the sharp pulled back ponytails sported by all the models.


My ones to watch are definitely Figueiredo and Jayet. They presented collections with distinctive yet restrained looks rather than over designing pieces a la River Island chic.


Aiming to promote recent graduates onto a more commercially viable platform, online Fashion Mode launched this September with a show on the 19th amid a lot of glitzy PR and press releases. The initiative is aiming ‘to bring back cutting edge fashion to London’, page enabling our ‘young fledgling designers…to be cultivated, shop supported and cherished’. Aside from this rather slushy blurb surrounding it, the ensuing show was enjoyable and a few gems were sent down the catwalk. Celeb top spot of the day must go to Nick Knowles of DIY SOS fame, who turned up with a man wearing a huge paper sock hat on his head. If anyone can shed any light on this guy, I would be so happy to find out more.


See background for ‘man in hat’ with Nick Knowles

First onto the runway was Carlotta Actis Barone with a collection that reminded me of the kind of clothes clichéd royals in storybooks wear. Dark dramatic reds, with big shoulders and lots of dangly bits hanging off, the collection featured draped and knotted dresses, plus work style dungarees. The hair, which usually passes me by on the catwalk, was amazing (up do’s with lots of boof) so congrats must go to Toni and Guy who styled the whole event.


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyren

The Wear My Skin collection is based on the fight against racism and the clothes attempt to represent workers clothes on the plantation fields. The skin element is portrayed using scribbled-print, black-and-white body con dresses, polo necks and leggings under all of the garments. A bit like those sleeves you buy when you want to look like you have a tattoo but an interesting way of pulling together collection none the less.

Next out was James Hillman, who based his collection on the 59 Bike Club, Teddy Boy look and a desire for simplicity. I will remember it for different reasons: the poor model who had to walk down the runway in a see through dress, the adorable grandma bursting with pride as her grandson (not in a see through dress) walked down the catwalk, and the stifling heat taking hold of the hall. NB Most people had picked up fans from the previous show and were fine…not me though.


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyren

His collection was very neutral and very beige/grey/brown. The use of fabrics generally reserved for womenswear was a promising idea but wasn’t used to a great effect. The semi-opaque trousers and jacket/dress were fun but I expected more from someone who defines themselves on their use of simplicity, tailoring and well styled masculinity. I did however, love the army boots which were worn with every outfit including the smarter tailored suits.


Illustration by Gareth A Hopkins

Elson Figueiredo is inspired by 19th century European carnies and uses 100% organic fair-trade cottons. He presented a really strong collection with nicely tailored jackets, mid length coats and loose fit chino-esque trousers. His self-description of ‘quirky and distinctive’ is perfect. The jackets are well cut and the added elbow pads and red edgings on pockets and lapels were definitely a bonus for me in terms of well added details.


The beige knee length coat worn with characteristic edging details was the highlight of the show for me, and slightly different from all of the other pieces he sent down the runway.

The star of the show (kept till last) was Florian Jayet. I really enjoyed his collection and many influences were prevalent in his styling – he interned with Alexander McQueen. Jayet’s S/S 2011 collection is inspired by insects and garments as armour style garments.

Using metallic fabrics and leather, his robust exoskeleton pieces are often softened with a long draped skirt or a flimsy top. Also, again with the noticing of the hair, I like the sharp pulled back ponytails sported by all the models.


My ones to watch are definitely Figueiredo and Jayet. They presented collections with distinctive yet restrained looks rather than over designing pieces a la River Island chic.


Illustration by Jaymie O’Callaghan

As I was leaving the Orschel-Read show at Fashion Scout last week, page I was planning to rush out of the Freemasons’ Hall and dash off to meet fashion editor at Somerset House. However, buy more about on walking into an atrium where I had queued only a little while earlier, I found myself in semi-darkness as part of the audience of an interactive performance presentation. It wasn’t until later that I discovered this was Rachel Freire’s S/S 2011 collection. 


Illustration by Jaymie O’Callaghan

(I would like to apologise in advance for the quality of my photos – I was taken unawares and had to snap away fairly blindly in the dark to catch anything I could!) 

The room veered between bright light and pitch black, with strobe lights picking out flamboyant reflective detailing on the garments.  Models were standing on plinths along the centre and around the edges of the room, all seemingly pretending to play violins and cellos in accompaniment to the riotous and slightly Patrick Wolf-esque backing music.  I didn’t realise until a few minutes in when some began to sing, that they weren’t models at all, but members of a band who were playing live, with the frontman hidden by a crowd of photographers at the opposite end of the darkened room. 

The clothes were a juxtaposition of 1950s-style flesh-toned corsets and underwear, alongside cutaway assymetric jackets with tudor-style sculptural tailoring.  Some of the band members wore huge luminescent head-dresses, staggering through the crowds like mythical beasts on sky-high wedges, stroking people’s faces and running their fingers through their hair. Reflective embroidery and fringing flashed bright white with the strobing, and at some points could even have been lit from inside as it flared up in red tones (although this may have had something to do with dozens of red camera focus lights struggling to function in the dark). Along with the ethereal white make up, the overall impression was part-Midsummer Night’s Dream and part-Cybergoth, with a slight nod towards Diana Dors

When I made it outside, blinking into the sunlight, the only clue I had to go on was a flyer handed to me for ‘The Irrepressibles’. After a bit of research I discovered the band are no strangers to Freire’s creations; she designs their stage costumes, which seem to be a perfect pairing with their dark, theatrical sound. 

Rather than taking the more traditional route of fashion and tailoring, Freire studied Theatre Design at Central Saint Martins, explaining the bold, dramatic themes in her work. Describing her style as period drama meets Bladerunner, her influences are said to stem from her love of historical costume combined with furutistic imagery, which sounds like it could be a recipe for disaster but in fact works amazingly well.  

All photography by Naomi Law

Categories ,1950s, ,A Midsummer Night’s Dream, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Diana Dors, ,London Fashion Week, ,menswear, ,Orschel-Read, ,Patrick Wolf, ,Reflective, ,S/S 2011, ,Somerset House, ,Strobe Lights, ,the irrepressibles, ,theatre, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Paul Costelloe (by Matt)

Jena.Theo Valkyrie by Matilde Sazio
Jena Theo Matilde SazioJena.Theo LFW A/W 2011, abortion Illustration by Matilde Sazio

I was ushered in through the door by a geezer of a Londoner chap, viagra order straight through to a high heeled officious lady, find then again to the very highest heels clinking their way to the front row to show me my seat. There were bags on my seat. Bags filled with goodies. Splendid. The lady next to me was bouncing her baby on her knee, as said baby was knawing on a pain au chocolat. “Nice earmuffs” I said to her, pointing towards her penguin earmuffs on her head. “To protect her from the sound. It can get very loud. But she does love it here. Loves the shows.” How much do I want a chilled out, cute baby like her. Also, cool mother! I know mothers who wouldn’t take their child to Tescos for fear of its screaming the flourescently lit shed down. To the left, was a mad, bright white, highly lit, flashing, mini bulb, sensation. Magic eyes, transfixing, blinding… The lady next to me shields her eyes for a bit, because of the intensity! Then it all went dark and we were treated to intro music as the anticipation built. Dum, dum, dum….dum… dum. EXCITED.

Karina Yarv
Jena.Theo LFW A/W 2011, Illustration by Karina Yarv

The show began. I was pleased to see that what was being presented was completely wearable. Definitely in London. Perhaps less so in Bristol – it was slightly ‘too’ urban for the West Country. However, if I had a choice (and el cash), some of those pieces would be getting worn in Falfael King and that secret bar we’ve been meaning to go to for a while… at least supper club. Or – ah see, I kind of want to move to London- again. Don’t get the wrong impression of Briz, I beg you. Anyway, the show was very charcoal, black and cream orientated. The models all had black stripes across their eyes and otherwise bare faces. This made them look like mysterious, moody superheros. I liked it, as it really set of the simple coloured, pieces; the models all expressionless (course), their masks and the movement of the light or dark pieces worked together perfectly. It felt like we were on the sea, with norwegian heroines. Swishing slowly about, their heels never falter, their gaze exact, the path has been set and the grey skies are dappled with stars, as the storm takes hold. These strong warriors will take us with their capes flowing behind them, their hair dancing in the wind.

Jena.Theo LFW A/W 2011, Illustration by Matilde Sazio

My favourite piece was one with an almost bustling at the back, flowing down to the ground, in one swipe. The front was a mini, the back was the drama, the fantasy.
Jena Theo Matilde SazioJena.Theo LFW A/W 2011, order Illustration by Matilde Sazio

I was ushered in through the door by a geezer of a Londoner chap, straight through to a high heeled officious lady, then again to the very highest heels clinking their way to the front row to show me my seat. There were bags on my seat. Bags filled with goodies. Splendid. The lady next to me was bouncing her baby on her knee, as said baby was knawing on a pain au chocolat. “Nice earmuffs” I said to her, pointing towards her penguin earmuffs on her head. “To protect her from the sound. It can get very loud. But she does love it here. Loves the shows.” How much do I want a chilled out, cute baby like her. Also, cool mother! I know mothers who wouldn’t take their child to Tescos for fear of its screaming the flourescently lit shed down. To the left, was a mad, bright white, highly lit, flashing, mini bulb, sensation. Magic eyes, transfixing, blinding… The lady next to me shields her eyes for a bit, because of the intensity! Then it all went dark and we were treated to intro music as the anticipation built. Dum, dum, dum….dum… dum. EXCITED.

Karina Yarv
Jena.Theo LFW A/W 2011, Illustration by Karina Yarv

The show began. I was pleased to see that what was being presented was completely wearable. Definitely in London. Perhaps less so in Bristol – it was slightly ‘too’ urban for the West Country. However, if I had a choice (and el cash), some of those pieces would be getting worn in Falfael King and that secret bar we’ve been meaning to go to for a while… at least supper club. Or – ah see, I kind of want to move to London- again. Don’t get the wrong impression of Briz, I beg you. Anyway, the show was very charcoal, black and cream orientated. The models all had black stripes across their eyes and otherwise bare faces. This made them look like mysterious, moody superheros. I liked it, as it really set of the simple coloured, pieces; the models all expressionless (course), their masks and the movement of the light or dark pieces worked together perfectly. It felt like we were on the sea, with norwegian heroines. Swishing slowly about, their heels never falter, their gaze exact, the path has been set and the grey skies are dappled with stars, as the storm takes hold. These strong warriors will take us with their capes flowing behind them, their hair dancing in the wind.

Jena.Theo Valkyrie by Matilde SazioJena.Theo LFW A/W 2011, Illustration by Matilde Sazio

My favourite piece was one with an almost bustling at the back, flowing down to the ground, in one swipe. The front was a mini, the back was the drama, the fantasy.
Jena Theo Matilde SazioJena.Theo LFW A/W 2011, no rx Illustration by Matilde Sazio

I was ushered in through the door by a geezer of a Londoner chap, side effects straight through to a high heeled officious lady, then again to the very highest heels clinking their way to the front row to show me my seat. There were bags on my seat. Bags filled with goodies. Splendid. The lady next to me was bouncing her baby on her knee, as said baby was knawing on a pain au chocolat. “Nice earmuffs” I said to her, pointing towards her penguin earmuffs on her head. “To protect her from the sound. It can get very loud. But she does love it here. Loves the shows.” How much do I want a chilled out, cute baby like her. Also, cool mother! I know mothers who wouldn’t take their child to Tescos for fear of its screaming the flourescently lit shed down. To the left, was a mad, bright white, highly lit, flashing, mini bulb, sensation. Magic eyes, transfixing, blinding… The lady next to me shields her eyes for a bit, because of the intensity! Then it all went dark and we were treated to intro music as the anticipation built. Dum, dum, dum….dum… dum. EXCITED.

Karina Yarv
Jena.Theo LFW A/W 2011, Illustration by Karina Yarv

The show began. I was pleased to see that what was being presented was completely wearable. Definitely in London. Perhaps less so in Bristol – it was slightly ‘too’ urban for the West Country. However, if I had a choice (and el cash), some of those pieces would be getting worn in Falfael King and that secret bar we’ve been meaning to go to for a while… at least supper club. Or – ah see, I kind of want to move to London- again. Don’t get the wrong impression of Briz, I beg you. Anyway, the show was very charcoal, black and cream orientated. The models all had black stripes across their eyes and otherwise bare faces. This made them look like mysterious, moody superheros. I liked it, as it really set of the simple coloured, pieces; the models all expressionless (course), their masks and the movement of the light or dark pieces worked together perfectly. It felt like we were on the sea, with norwegian heroines. Swishing slowly about, their heels never falter, their gaze exact, the path has been set and the grey skies are dappled with stars, as the storm takes hold. These strong warriors will take us with their capes flowing behind them, their hair dancing in the wind.

Jena.Theo Valkyrie by Matilde SazioJena.Theo LFW A/W 2011, Illustration by Matilde Sazio

My favourite piece was one with an almost bustling at the back, flowing down to the ground, in one swipe. The front was a mini, the back was the drama, the fantasy. I would love to wear this one standing at the front of a ship. Not a ferry, a ship. Jena.Theo designs were indeed simple, but they are deserving of their sparkling lights.

Illustration by Maria Papadimitriou

I’ll never say a bad word about Mr Paul Costelloe. His was the first on-schedule show I ever saw, for sale back in 2008. It was a disaster – you can read my review here (my have we come a long way with our fashion week reviews). Despite that particular experience being pretty traumatic, diagnosis I always look forward to what he’ll present us each season, and I genuinely believe he’s the most underrated designer on the schedule – AND he always gets that hideous graveyard 9.30am opening slot. Anyway, enough of the pity, I’m sure he gets along just fine.


Paul Costelloe chatting outside the tent, post-show. All photography by Matt Bramford

Of course, this wouldn’t be fashion week without a cycling trauma, and it was on Friday morning that my back brake completely went so I was left only with the front one, guaranteed to send me flying over the handlebars should I actually need to stop. A quick trip into miserable Evans Cycles soon sorted this but meant I had to dash like a lunatic to Somerset House and just managed to leg it inside before the show started.


Illustration by Lesley Barnes

I was disappointed not to be saddled up against those two lovely old dears I met last time – this time I endured a rather unforgiving fashion blogger. I tend to stand at the top of one of the aisles to secure good pictures, but said fashion blogger deemed it acceptable to stand in front of me. I politely explained that I had chosen that spot on purpose, and I would really appreciate it if she’d take her enormous Mulberry bag and ridiculously large coat somewhere else. She moved an inch to the left. Cheers, then!

God I’m going on a bit, aren’t I? Well, the show itself was brilliant. This season saw Costelloe move in a more sophisticated direction. The catwalk was awash with luxurious tweeds and tartans in vibrant colours. Structured twin-sets with a contemporary edge stood side-by-side a-line dresses in unusual materials; delicious floral prints were teamed with cropped blazers, while hints of military on more a-line dresses were complimented with a roaring forties/fabulous fifties soundtrack of Bobby Darin and The Andrews Sisters (maybe). Poker-straight red wigs added a sexy, playful edge to what is a more mature range of womenswear.

Last season I wasn’t that struck on the menswear, but this year I am ALL OVER IT. Again, taking a more sophisticated direction, sharp suits (in similar tartans and tweeds to those seen on the girls) were aplenty. Floor length coats and double-breasted blazers really complimented the womenswear. Contrasting trousers in really bright colours were paired with tame blazers, allowing Costelloe’s men to be quirky but smart at the same time.


Illustration by Maria Papadimitriou

It was a massive collection – the biggest I saw during the day – but each piece had been carefully selected to compliment the next and never was it boring. The only way I could have enjoyed the show more was if Unforgiving Fashion Blogger hadn’t been such a knob. Hilariously she was fighting for my prime photographer’s spot to take pictures with her Blackberry! Well, I ask you.

Another great outing for PC, though. Long may he reign – in a sea of often miserable A/W 2011 dark collections, his whimsical approach and playful colours are a ray of sunshine.

All photography by Matt Bramford

Categories ,1940s, ,1950s, ,A/W 2011, ,Bobby Darin, ,british fashion council, ,Catwalk review, ,Lesley Barnes, ,London Fashion Week, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Matt Bramford, ,Paul Costelloe, ,Ray of sunshine, ,Tartan, ,The Andrews Sisters, ,Tweed

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Amelia’s Magazine | Frock Me! Vintage Fair at the Brighton Corn Exchange


Illustration by Rosie Shephard

Coming in from a freezing cold Brighton day, here dosage I was welcomed with the warm glow of row upon row of vintage. A cornucopia of vintage clothing and accessories including 1950s lace wedding dresses, link 1960 shifts, information pills 1970s smocks and 1980s mohair. This was Frock Me Vintage Fashion Fair at the Brighton Corn Exchange. An enticing collection of clothes, bags, jewellery, shoes and even a whole stand dedicated to vintage buttons.

Frock Me Vintage Fashion Fairs, a vintage fashion institution no less, have been running since the mid 1990s. With awareness and demand for vintage apparel rising massively since the early 1990s, it’s clear to see Frock Me haven’t missed a trick. Walking in to the Corn Exchange was like stepping in to a props and costume department, no surprise really as Matthew Adams, who runs Frock Me, studied Costume and Theatre Design during the mid 1970s.

There’s something quite liberating about rummaging through row upon row of vintage clobber. The feeling that you’re buying a one-off,  something that’s built to last, something that’s stood the test of time, something with a history. Why would you want to buy anything new and mass produced ever again? Vintage is big business with everyone searching for one-of-a-kind fashion, and fairs like this attract an eclectic bunch adorned in various clothes throughout the ages, 1940s swing mixes seamlessly with 1960s kitsch, like a history lesson in style.


Illustration by Rosie Shephard

There was an overwhelming choice from over 70 exhibitors, but something caught my eye, all feathers and netting and appliqué, so like a magpie swoops on something shiny, I swooped in on a hat stall. To me these millinery marvels were the stars of the show. Lovely 1920s cloches, 1950s pillboxes and 1960s fur felt styles were begging to be tried on.

Frock Me Vintage Fashion Fairs have become a regular face on the vintage fashion circuit with fairs being held several times a year at Chelsea Town Hall and Brighton Corn Exchange.  Check out frockmevintagefashion.com for more details.

Categories ,1920s, ,1940s, ,1950s, ,1960s, ,1970s, ,1980s, ,brighton, ,Chelsea Town Hall, ,Corn Exhange, ,Costume, ,Dress, ,fashion, ,Frock Me, ,Matthew Adams, ,vintage

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Amelia’s Magazine | Graduate Fashion Week 2010: UWE Bristol and UCA Epsom


I always look forward to the Northumbria University BA fashion degree show for two reasons. One, look because it’s always effing good – the innovation, prostate technique and creativity on display is second to pretty much nobody at Graduate Fashion Week. Secondly, I studied at the university, so this review might seem like a big fat plate of bias – I assure you, though, that it isn’t.

Nestled on the front row in between Style Savage Steve and the ever wonderful Hilary Alexander (who bopped, sketched and scribbled her way through the show) I was a little concerned that my big lens (said the actress to the bishop) might block the view of either of these fashion journalists. Neither said anything though, so I think I got away with it.

Opening the show with an explosion of glam-rock-meets-Elvis-meets-Lady-Gaga, Naomi New presented a very polished micro-collection featuring exaggerated shoulders of leather, spikes and studs, and horse-hair tails. Models strutted back and forth with real sex appeal and the quality of Naomi’s craftsmanship looked, from what I could see, incredible.


I always look forward to the Northumbria University BA fashion degree show for two reasons. One, try because it’s always effing good – the innovation, sickness technique and creativity on display is second to pretty much nobody at Graduate Fashion Week. Secondly, cialis 40mg I studied at the university, so this review might seem like a big fat plate of bias – I assure you, though, that it isn’t.

Nestled on the front row in between Style Savage Steve and the ever wonderful Hilary Alexander (who bopped, sketched and scribbled her way through the show) I was a little concerned that my big lens (said the actress to the bishop) might block the view of either of these fashion journalists. Neither said anything though, so I think I got away with it.

Opening the show with an explosion of glam-rock-meets-Elvis-meets-Lady-Gaga, Naomi New presented a very polished micro-collection featuring exaggerated shoulders of leather, spikes and studs, and horse-hair tails. Models strutted back and forth with real sex appeal and the quality of Naomi’s craftsmanship looked, from what I could see, incredible.


I always look forward to the Northumbria University BA fashion degree show for two reasons. One, ask because it’s always effing good – the innovation, mind technique and creativity on display is second to pretty much nobody at Graduate Fashion Week. Secondly, visit this site I studied at the university, so this review might seem like a big fat plate of bias – I assure you, though, that it isn’t.

Nestled on the front row in between Style Savage Steve and the ever wonderful Hilary Alexander (who bopped, sketched and scribbled her way through the show) I was a little concerned that my big lens (said the actress to the bishop) might block the view of either of these fashion journalists. Neither said anything though, so I think I got away with it.

Opening the show with an explosion of glam-rock-meets-Elvis-meets-Lady-Gaga, Naomi New presented a very polished micro-collection featuring exaggerated shoulders of leather, spikes and studs, and horse-hair tails. Models strutted back and forth with real sex appeal and the quality of Naomi’s craftsmanship looked, from what I could see, incredible.



Anna Piercy, website like this UCA Epsom, advice Illustrated by Lisa Billvik

Well well well the kids certainly know what they’re doing at Graduate Fashion Week this year. Sunday kicked off day one of shows for the creatively minded at our very own Earl’s Court and believe me these are the McQueens of the future.

UWE Bristol showcased some beautiful structured puffball dresses from Georgina Kitchen teamed with knee high socks and see-through metallic partitions. Jessie Potter had a clear vision too, showing off an appliquéd felt and wool collection in a 70s pallet of mustard and burgundy with pom-pom headdresses. Jessica Hart clearly had the most funm however – showing a pastel based range of graphic prints that Lady Gaga would feel sheepish in. Necklaces were gigantic, as were pockets, in what was a playful and crisp collection, complete with bow headbands of course. (Read more about UWE Bristol’s show here – with even MORE illustrations!)


Jessica Hart, illustrated by Jenny Goldstone

I was not expecting the standard of design as seen at UCA Epsom University’s show after though. Think of Pilgrim’s, 50s housewives, teddy boys, Julia Roberts in Mona Lisa Smile and a dash of kids TV and you’re half way there. This was a serious clash of icons creating a surprisingly good statement for the University.

But amongst the host of talent there were some definite faces of the fashion future to watch, and a surprising amount of menswear. Remember you heard it here first.

Lucinda Ailes: One so patriotic, not to our fair Blighty mind, but all things American were emblazoned on everything through an array of stars and stripes. Models sported devoted shorts, leggings and maxi dresses but all was kept thoroughly wearable by grey mix-and-match pieces to wear back with the collection.

Katie Barret: A different kind of heritage was displayed in Barret’s show of menswear pieces. Thoroughly Scottish and proud of it, models sported full kilted dresses as well as the traditional skirts. The whole feel was very rugged using natural fabrics and even slightly drab colours. But each look was spiced up with a hint of tomato red, whether it be in a top or the waist detailing of said kilt instantly adding an extra something to the look.

Antonia Lloyd: Another one for the boys but this time not quite so manly. Lloyd made sure the boys sparkled in glittered tuxedo style shirts and knickerbockers to be proud of. There was something quite romantic about the look, with buttons done up to the neck and a palette of muted greys and navies.

Beata Gebka: I told you there were pilgrims and it came from Gebka’s show. Models sported traditional style long dresses accessorized with cloches and capes. As unwearable as it sounds, the pieces were surprisingly covetable, finished off with black ribbon detailing and even bib fronts. This may just be the new look come autumn and one that features heavily around the key muted pallet of greys and navies again.

Stency Kidega: Frills frills and more frills was what Kidega must have been dreaming of. They were added to the shoulders of jackets and the necklines of coats but wherever they were placed they looked beautiful. Kidega pulled off a very tailored collection, which isn’t always the most interesting, but the corset detailing on the dresses and the aforementioned jackets made sure that it was. Delicious.

Eve McDonald: McDonald definitely has a 50s housewife buried inside her otherwise she wouldn’t be able to produce such stunning floral shirts. But she’s also hiding a Teddy Boy too, as pieces were mixed with checked trousers and long shorts. Finished off with floral headscarves tied in oversized bows I almost wanted to pull on my espadrilles and listen to some good old Rock ‘n’ Roll.

Anna Piercy: It’s Piercy who brought the piece de résistance of the whole night for me. Piercey managed to create a collection based entirely around oversized letters. Seriously. Not that much to hear but the fabrics still flowed into beautiful a-line dresses with cut-out detailing. Even more intelligent was the use of panelling and sequins to create letters from the arms and body of a dress. And the finale – Piercey’s models came together to spell out the word ‘RANDOM.’ It was and yet I still liked it.


Illustrations by Lisa Billvik

How nice though that we got to see the faces behind the fashion as each designer (embarrassingly for most but certainly not all) walked the catwalk with one of their models. It was cheers and ovation all round from the crowd and do you know what…. they thoroughly deserved it.

Hear, hear!

Photographs courtesy of catwalking.com

Categories ,1950s, ,70s, ,americana, ,Anna Piercy, ,Antonia Lloyd, ,Beata Gebka, ,Earls Court, ,Eve McDonald, ,Georgina Kitchen, ,Graduate Fashion Week 2010, ,Jemma Crow, ,Jessie Potter, ,Julia Roberts, ,Katie Barrett, ,Kids TV, ,Lady Gaga, ,Lisa Billvik, ,Lucinda Ailes, ,McQueen, ,menswear, ,metallics, ,Pilgrims, ,scotland, ,Stency Kidega, ,Sunday, ,Teddy Boys, ,Tuxedo, ,UCA Epsom, ,UWE Bristol, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Graduate Fashion Week 2010: UWE Bristol and UCA Epsom


I always look forward to the Northumbria University BA fashion degree show for two reasons. One, look because it’s always effing good – the innovation, prostate technique and creativity on display is second to pretty much nobody at Graduate Fashion Week. Secondly, I studied at the university, so this review might seem like a big fat plate of bias – I assure you, though, that it isn’t.

Nestled on the front row in between Style Savage Steve and the ever wonderful Hilary Alexander (who bopped, sketched and scribbled her way through the show) I was a little concerned that my big lens (said the actress to the bishop) might block the view of either of these fashion journalists. Neither said anything though, so I think I got away with it.

Opening the show with an explosion of glam-rock-meets-Elvis-meets-Lady-Gaga, Naomi New presented a very polished micro-collection featuring exaggerated shoulders of leather, spikes and studs, and horse-hair tails. Models strutted back and forth with real sex appeal and the quality of Naomi’s craftsmanship looked, from what I could see, incredible.


I always look forward to the Northumbria University BA fashion degree show for two reasons. One, try because it’s always effing good – the innovation, sickness technique and creativity on display is second to pretty much nobody at Graduate Fashion Week. Secondly, cialis 40mg I studied at the university, so this review might seem like a big fat plate of bias – I assure you, though, that it isn’t.

Nestled on the front row in between Style Savage Steve and the ever wonderful Hilary Alexander (who bopped, sketched and scribbled her way through the show) I was a little concerned that my big lens (said the actress to the bishop) might block the view of either of these fashion journalists. Neither said anything though, so I think I got away with it.

Opening the show with an explosion of glam-rock-meets-Elvis-meets-Lady-Gaga, Naomi New presented a very polished micro-collection featuring exaggerated shoulders of leather, spikes and studs, and horse-hair tails. Models strutted back and forth with real sex appeal and the quality of Naomi’s craftsmanship looked, from what I could see, incredible.


I always look forward to the Northumbria University BA fashion degree show for two reasons. One, ask because it’s always effing good – the innovation, mind technique and creativity on display is second to pretty much nobody at Graduate Fashion Week. Secondly, visit this site I studied at the university, so this review might seem like a big fat plate of bias – I assure you, though, that it isn’t.

Nestled on the front row in between Style Savage Steve and the ever wonderful Hilary Alexander (who bopped, sketched and scribbled her way through the show) I was a little concerned that my big lens (said the actress to the bishop) might block the view of either of these fashion journalists. Neither said anything though, so I think I got away with it.

Opening the show with an explosion of glam-rock-meets-Elvis-meets-Lady-Gaga, Naomi New presented a very polished micro-collection featuring exaggerated shoulders of leather, spikes and studs, and horse-hair tails. Models strutted back and forth with real sex appeal and the quality of Naomi’s craftsmanship looked, from what I could see, incredible.



Anna Piercy, website like this UCA Epsom, advice Illustrated by Lisa Billvik

Well well well the kids certainly know what they’re doing at Graduate Fashion Week this year. Sunday kicked off day one of shows for the creatively minded at our very own Earl’s Court and believe me these are the McQueens of the future.

UWE Bristol showcased some beautiful structured puffball dresses from Georgina Kitchen teamed with knee high socks and see-through metallic partitions. Jessie Potter had a clear vision too, showing off an appliquéd felt and wool collection in a 70s pallet of mustard and burgundy with pom-pom headdresses. Jessica Hart clearly had the most funm however – showing a pastel based range of graphic prints that Lady Gaga would feel sheepish in. Necklaces were gigantic, as were pockets, in what was a playful and crisp collection, complete with bow headbands of course. (Read more about UWE Bristol’s show here – with even MORE illustrations!)


Jessica Hart, illustrated by Jenny Goldstone

I was not expecting the standard of design as seen at UCA Epsom University’s show after though. Think of Pilgrim’s, 50s housewives, teddy boys, Julia Roberts in Mona Lisa Smile and a dash of kids TV and you’re half way there. This was a serious clash of icons creating a surprisingly good statement for the University.

But amongst the host of talent there were some definite faces of the fashion future to watch, and a surprising amount of menswear. Remember you heard it here first.

Lucinda Ailes: One so patriotic, not to our fair Blighty mind, but all things American were emblazoned on everything through an array of stars and stripes. Models sported devoted shorts, leggings and maxi dresses but all was kept thoroughly wearable by grey mix-and-match pieces to wear back with the collection.

Katie Barret: A different kind of heritage was displayed in Barret’s show of menswear pieces. Thoroughly Scottish and proud of it, models sported full kilted dresses as well as the traditional skirts. The whole feel was very rugged using natural fabrics and even slightly drab colours. But each look was spiced up with a hint of tomato red, whether it be in a top or the waist detailing of said kilt instantly adding an extra something to the look.

Antonia Lloyd: Another one for the boys but this time not quite so manly. Lloyd made sure the boys sparkled in glittered tuxedo style shirts and knickerbockers to be proud of. There was something quite romantic about the look, with buttons done up to the neck and a palette of muted greys and navies.

Beata Gebka: I told you there were pilgrims and it came from Gebka’s show. Models sported traditional style long dresses accessorized with cloches and capes. As unwearable as it sounds, the pieces were surprisingly covetable, finished off with black ribbon detailing and even bib fronts. This may just be the new look come autumn and one that features heavily around the key muted pallet of greys and navies again.

Stency Kidega: Frills frills and more frills was what Kidega must have been dreaming of. They were added to the shoulders of jackets and the necklines of coats but wherever they were placed they looked beautiful. Kidega pulled off a very tailored collection, which isn’t always the most interesting, but the corset detailing on the dresses and the aforementioned jackets made sure that it was. Delicious.

Eve McDonald: McDonald definitely has a 50s housewife buried inside her otherwise she wouldn’t be able to produce such stunning floral shirts. But she’s also hiding a Teddy Boy too, as pieces were mixed with checked trousers and long shorts. Finished off with floral headscarves tied in oversized bows I almost wanted to pull on my espadrilles and listen to some good old Rock ‘n’ Roll.

Anna Piercy: It’s Piercy who brought the piece de résistance of the whole night for me. Piercey managed to create a collection based entirely around oversized letters. Seriously. Not that much to hear but the fabrics still flowed into beautiful a-line dresses with cut-out detailing. Even more intelligent was the use of panelling and sequins to create letters from the arms and body of a dress. And the finale – Piercey’s models came together to spell out the word ‘RANDOM.’ It was and yet I still liked it.


Illustrations by Lisa Billvik

How nice though that we got to see the faces behind the fashion as each designer (embarrassingly for most but certainly not all) walked the catwalk with one of their models. It was cheers and ovation all round from the crowd and do you know what…. they thoroughly deserved it.

Hear, hear!

Photographs courtesy of catwalking.com

Categories ,1950s, ,70s, ,americana, ,Anna Piercy, ,Antonia Lloyd, ,Beata Gebka, ,Earls Court, ,Eve McDonald, ,Georgina Kitchen, ,Graduate Fashion Week 2010, ,Jemma Crow, ,Jessie Potter, ,Julia Roberts, ,Katie Barrett, ,Kids TV, ,Lady Gaga, ,Lisa Billvik, ,Lucinda Ailes, ,McQueen, ,menswear, ,metallics, ,Pilgrims, ,scotland, ,Stency Kidega, ,Sunday, ,Teddy Boys, ,Tuxedo, ,UCA Epsom, ,UWE Bristol, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Diptyque Candles

Bands like Okkervil River are eminently missable. They’re so redolent of a slew of others, pill more about and if you’re not on friendly terms with their songs they’ll pass you by like so much jaunty, information pills pleasant Americana. They’re also a great illustration of why you should persist with music.

And that’s not some pious, try rockist view meaning you’ve got to put down what you’re reading, sit up, and pay complete attention. It’s just good to give things a chance to get beyond your initial scrobbler – which makes quickfire connections, comparisons and judgments based on an increasingly convergent shared knowledge-bank of 50 years of pop. It’s about checking in music’s hiding places for that spark that turns a casual recommendation from a friend into your favourite album of the year.

You need to listen to Okkervil River because the real star attraction is the lyrics of Will Sheff. Like a Prozac-ed Conor Oberst words tumble out of him in stanzas, cascading, beautifully chosen, but always controlled. “Although I put my lips to your face / trying to push his kiss out of its place / although my heart started to race / now it has slowed / I’ll let it go,” he sings on ‘Song Of Our So-Called Friend’.

Behind him five guys playing the alt-country instruments you’d expect stay out of the way. Childlike drummer Travis Nelson (who has excellent wiry drummer’s hair) and keyboardist and trumpeter Scott Bracket sing along with every word, like their own band’s biggest fans.

Six members is often a bad, self-indulgent idea but OR’s are always serving and augmenting their songs. The slow-burning ‘The President’s Dead’ segues masterfully into ‘Black’, which is a pretty straightforward three chord stomper but when Okkervillised it comes out yearning, wistful and layered. They’re like “partytime!” Wilco, Being There-era. There’s a touch of Arcade Fire in their scope and ear for an epic. This sometimes skirts too close to hokey, but with lyrics as good as Sheff’s they’ve earned their slide guitar solos.

On latest album The Stage Names, everything comes together during the final song ‘John Allyn Smith Sails’. All the words, all the fear, all the joy, all the themes that have preceded it fall into place when it morphs into something from a very famous album. It’s one of the most beautiful musical moments of 2007. Ruining it before you’ve heard it would be a spoiler on a par with that Planet Of The Apes video cover featuring the Statue Of Liberty.

It’s a transcendent moment tonight. They know exactly how good it is. They audaciously don’t even end the set with it. They’re rightfully confident. They may be America’s best band.

Why is it so great being 16? It’s an angsty, pill uncertain time in which you doubt everything, troche struggle with a bunch of new and confusing ordeals and inevitably puke down your top talking to the guy/girl you like at an underwhelming party. But we largely remember it with total fondness.

You needed to work your problems through to their logical conclusion, buy more about no matter how labyrinthine they seemed. You’d not yet developed the coping strategy for later life – blithely shrugging, saying “well, them’s the breaks” and getting on with it. We can all agree that that’s a far simpler and more practical way to deal with things, but Jamie Lenman of Reuben is stuck in adolescence. His last thought is his best, and he’s going to yell it at you. This is thrillingly vital. I worry for him.

Slightly overweight, borderline ugly, he’s preaching to a small and dedicated throng. It’s a metal crowd – everyone is either unfathomably young and infectious or crusty and old enough to know better. It’s like being back at your first ever gig. An unexpected obscure song, a friendly moshpit, loud, people screaming.

Lenman’s band expends tangible effort, like the best air guitarists. Drummer Guy Davis reaches Canty-like levels of inventiveness, buried under a relentless propulsive drumstorm. He sits up throughout, a skinny Rollins, if he shaved his head he’d be a nutter. Bassist Jon Pearce does a textbook tall man, long instrument, purposeful sway thing. The three of them look moments away from combusting.

They tick lots of my boxes. Inventive, heavy, melodic, loud, fast, screamy, catchy. These are mostly the wrong boxes for 2007. ‘Some Mothers Do Ave Em,’ with a gargantuan riff that Josh Homme would divorce Brody (remember her?) for, is tossed away, apparently unaware of its own greatness. ‘Let’s Stop Hanging Out’ is their pop hit – a problem, because like almost everything they’ve done, it’s structured as if written by an Asberger’s sufferer. It lurches from A to B via, like, 37, each section marginally better than the last.

This analysis is all very silly and waaaay too glowing for a band you could fairly dismiss as dunderheaded nu rock – big riffs, often-daft words, sometimes cheesy tunes. But there’s something elusive, weird and brilliant at work which makes it seem completely unfair that Reuben are playing a half-empty goth club rather than enjoying Biffy-like love and adulation at the Astoria.

Their tour DVD, documenting life in a band too poor to give up jobs at supermarkets, is the saddest music film you’ll see this year, including ‘Control’. There’s a purity to Reuben, because you feel deep down they’ve realised they’re never going to “make it”. They’re getting as much out of nights like this as they possibly can.

They will surely disappear within five years, but Lenman will be back, I assure you. He’s a genius, that kid at school who was amazing at everything he tried but strangely awkward. His songs, once you’re over their ever-so-slight similarity to a bunch of nu metal we all wish hadn’t happened, are like nothing else in 2007.

I emphatically resist that getting older means you need to listen to cerebral, reflective music. It’s patronising, and a denial of where you’ve come from. Reuben are funny, but they’re also extremely earnest, and that seems to be a dirty word these days. But why should we forget what it’s like to be earnest? Why are we ashamed of being heartfelt? Why is it ok to call directionless, indulgent “folk” beautiful and intelligent when loving heroically crafted “rock” gets you laughed at? By your early 20s these are questions that seem too unanswerable to worry about

It’s fair to assume that most bands are having fun; travelling around the country playing music and generally being outrageous on tour buses is fine work if you can get it. Kotki Dwa however sound like they’re enjoying it even more then everyone else, buy more about not only have they rummaged around the musical toy box but they’ve emptied the shop. Robin’s Clogs is a wonderfully crafted indie pop song, mind with slicing guitars not dissimilar to Foals except without the edge and with a squeaking synthesiser over the top playing out a melody as catchy as they come.

Kotki Dwa then are one of the new generation of British pop bands who are re claiming the fun in indie from across the Atlantic. Vocalist Alex, unlike so many of his contemporaries, is actually able to sing melodically and belt out fine vocals with a painfully delicate voice, sometimes sounding on the verge of tears, yet conversely remaining wistfully upbeat, lips smiling but eyes crying. You know the type. This is never more apparent than on B-side Halogen, which holds it’s own to make a single of two fine songs. Oh, and they can even sing in French.
New ways, more about new ways, site
I dream of wires.
So I press ‘c’ for comfort, information pills
I dream of wires, the old ways.
Gary Numan, ‘I Dream of Wires’

Not only an underrated Gary Numan B side, but the latest retro clothing shop to open off Brick Lane. On the opening night, I Dream of Wires offered a kaleidoscopic mix of vintage fashion and nostalgic trinkets creating an environment Mr Benn would have reveled in. Had he actually existed outside of television. (For those who were not raised on children’s cartoons, Mr Benn was my childhood hero and the eponymous character of the classic children’s television show. He tried on clothes and was transported to exciting and dangerous worlds through the back door of the dressing-up shop. Now you know.) The rails ached with an eclectic clothing range as a cropped Moschino jacket with candy-striped lining hung beside a fluorescent pair of ski pants and bejewelled sweatshirt. Carla created a strong look Gary Numan would have loved, pairing a vintage dress with animal emblazoned leggings. In the display cabinets, curious and peculiar ornaments were arranged, the sort your grandparents displayed lovingly on tabletops and shelves. The changing room was continuously occupied as treasures came back and forth to be tried on for size and, happily for all, there were no January sale style brawls. Visiting the shop was like being in my own Mr Benn inspired magical adventure, starting out in the wardrobe of my babysitter in the eighties and stumbling through to my Nana’s bungalow. With so many second-hand and vintage clothing shops located around Brick Lane, I Dream of Wires is sure to appeal to those who get kicks poking fun at retro styles to create eccentric, outrageous ensembles.

carla.jpg
In amongst the glut of sugar coated schmaltz vying for the rather hollow accolade of Christmas number #1 for 2007 is this rather lovely cut from Welsh Wizards Super Furry Animals. A gift it is indeed. The track will be available free to fans in download format, view complete with B side and artwork on Christmas day. It’s safe to say this won’t be troubling the upper reaches of the charts then, viagra but when did SFA ever sell any records? The band’s lack of relative commercial success is still somewhat perplexing.

It matters not. Never intended to be a Christmas single, TGTKOG is one of many highlights from long player Hey Venus! released earlier this year. There are no bells or lyrics about snow. Just Gruff’s gorgeous tones, a meandering brass line and some intricate harmonies. Nadolig Llawen.

Imagine you’re watching one of those American hospital dramas on TV. Perhaps it’s the Christmas episode or season finale, medicine either way something is bound to go wrong. And when the shit hits the fan it breaks down into a montage of various characters in their scrubs, and remorseful, shop head in hands. Then, think of the music that accompanies those tearful medics. It’s emotive, driven by acoustic guitar and piano, with mildly folky vocals and a healthy dose of strings. Deadman, by House of Brothers, is one such track. Both sad and uplifting, this song has been strictly tailored in the studio to drag listeners up to peaks and down into troughs.

House of Brothers is Andrew Jackson’s solo project and is vastly different from his work with Scarecrow and The Death of Rosa Luxemburg. When I read the name of this EP I instantly thought of Jim Jarmusch’s film of the same title. House of Brothers’ release has little in common with the black and white western. I suppose you could say it’s lyrically bleak but the upbeat arrangements prevent Jackson from plumbing the depths.

Although lacking the polish of the title track, the other material has the same guitar/piano/strings, or indie-folk, sound. They are too long and it’s hard to maintain any kind of enthusiasm by the final track, correctly named The Last Ballad.

This EP is also aptly titled, because it retreads a musical style, which doesn’t have much life in it. It feels a little tired, as though most of the effort went into the first track. And was that effort worth it? As Jackson sings, “Don’t want to rise and shine for the second time. Just leave me be.” Perhaps we should.

tnp_press_pic_3_dean_chalkey.JPG

Having already waxed lyrical about These New Puritans after seeing them live in September, viagra approved I was more than ready and willing to get stuck into their much anticipated full-length offering, pharm Beat Pyramid. After much to-ing and fro-ing with release dates, cialis 40mg it looked like this one was going to up in the air for some time, however news is that’ll hit shelves this January and if you’ve an MP3 player, turntable, cassette deck or CD car stereo, I urge you to go out and buy it in every format and play it at high volume wherever you go. This is not THE perfect album, if such a thing even exists, and I won’t and can’t vouch for its life changing properties. However, what this is, I’d like to hope, is the beginning of something great. An album that delivers some absolutely stompingly good tracks, interspersed with a few that never take off; however it’s all a matter of context. Reaching such heights of brilliance at some points, if they fall short for just a moment at others, it hits as a minor disappointment. The fact is some of their lesser tracks would put most ‘indie’ hits to shame. Not a bad position to be in.

Beat Pyramid starts as it means to go on. The opener, …ce I Will Say This Twice which is picked up again in the closing track, sets the scene perfectly for the rest of the album. A beautiful slice of 80′s inspired, sharply constructed electronica, vocals nothing more than a mysterious, androgynous voice stating ‘I will say this Twice’. At just 16 seconds long its peculiar hypnotic effect leaves you wanting more, the sudden end coming frustratingly too soon.

Luckily the stomping drums that usher in Numbers make everything better again. As with their live performances, the beat is king on this record and having seen George Barnett (ringleader Jack’s twin brother) do some quite incredible things with a set of drumsticks, I was more than pleased to see all that demonic, tightly controlled energy translate onto record. “What’s your favourite number/What does it mean?/What’s your favourite number/what does it mean?” Jack never lets up. Insistent repetition is very much the order of the day with TNP, words becoming a beat within themselves, not what is said but more the pattern in which it’s spoken, over and over until it loses meaning but never effect.

Swords of Truth’s distorted trumpets swoop in like the opening of a Dancehall track, the beat conjuring similar reference, it’s easy to spot those unexpected influences that transform this band into something far more interesting and complex than your average post-punk outfit. It would be easy to mistake their eclectic tastes for pretension (Sonic Youth, Dubstep, the Occult, David Lynch) but they’re all laid out here, grabbed and borrowed from seemingly disparate genres. When mention was made of hip-hop whiz kid J Dilla I had my doubts, but they meant it; his irresistible, inside out beats littered throughout.

And now onto Doppelganger. I first heard this track online and immediately spent a good hour trying to track it down and just own it. A stuttering, Timbaland-esque experiment in beat and rhythm, it’s sparsity and directness carried along by, what can only be described as a ‘jangly’ electro dreamscape, giving it a kind of futuristic grandeur and irresistible head nodding appeal. It’s very rare that a band actually creates anything new but Doppelganger is so wilfully unusual and unexpected that it becomes almost impossible to place. At points I’m reminded of The Fall, Aphex Twin, GGD, Klaxons but as quickly as the comparisons come to mind, they’re dashed aside. This is something else and I’m having trouble putting my finger on it. I gave up trying. Whichever way you read it, at its core is something that just works, ultimately making it the standout track of the album.

Infinity Ytinifnl, £4, mkk3, all march along in a similar vein, perhaps a little less instantly striking, they nevertheless continue that ‘new sound’ with some impressive angular rhythms. Aggressive, brash, disjointed, taut. Heard outside of the context of this album, they would probably have had me frantically scrambling for the volume dial. Instead I just sit back and enjoy.

Things come to an unusually melancholic close with Costume, all drawn out, languid keyboards harmonising with Jack’s slow, deliberate vocals as they rise and fall through what feels like one continuous chorus. Interruption in the form of George’s powerful stuttering, staccato drumbeat, take this track to another level. The obligatory ‘Downbeat Finale’ this is not.

So, we return to the beginning again with I Will Say This Twi…, this time just 7 seconds long and ending abruptly like a sudden pull of the plug. The album comes full circle and while none of the mystery surround TNP has been solved, as impenetrable and cryptic as ever in their themes, even their intent, what they do reveal is a unexpectedly accomplished collection of off-beat, otherworldly tracks that remind you that taking a risk sometimes pays off.

Candles – pillar, symptoms tea lights and especially church candles in wine bottles. I love them all. Once I bought a load of tea lights, visit web lined them up on the windowsill behind my bed and lit them, hoping to create a nice atmosphere in my squat (ok it wasn’t actually a squat, but we did have a beetle and maggot infestation – who thought these life forms could co-exist so happily?) This ambiance lasted for about half an hour, until my friend forgot they were lit and leant back too far whilst sitting on the bed. His hair caught fire. After this debacle I’ve been banned from candles just incase I drop out of University to pursue arson as a career. But fate was quick to intervene, as some delightfully scented Diptyque candles were delivered to Amelia and I got to spark up. Diptyque began producing candles in 1963, and in the ensuing 45 years it has cornered the candle market with its exotic wax concoctions and beautiful packaging. In time for Christmas and the New Year, Diptyque have produced three limited edition winter candles – Encens (incense), Gingembre (ginger) and Epicea (spruce). These are candles your mum will actually appreciate as a gift, and so will everyone else within smelling distance. With 60 hours of burning time per candle, this seasonal trio are sure to last through the festive period to deliver the perfect aroma to cure January blues.

epicea-small.jpg

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Amelia’s Magazine | Explore the world of Beautiful Soul

The inaugural round of graduates from London College of Fashion’s new MA course entitled Fashion and the Environment, about it site exhibited their findings this weekend within the Southbank Centre’s Queen Elizabeth Hall.

P2012400Image courtesy of Rachael Oku depicting the work of Shibin Vasudevan.

The students have taken a variety of approaches to tackle their environmental concerns with the fashion industry, some more successful than others. I wasn’t totally convinced by the practicality and wearability of Shibin Vasudevan’s shirts made from the contents of a hoover bag, though they were very visually stimulating. I was really excited by a number of projects including Shibin’s as his idea was highly innovative.

handheadheartHandheadheart collection image, courtesy of Anna Maria Hesse.

Anna Maria Hesse utilised her background in knitwear and deep interest in sustainable fashion to produce a collection entitled ‘handheadheart’ that discourages consumerism. Her beautifully subtle, draped garments are made to be worn in a variety of ways – so a top is a dress is a skirt. Her thinking is thus: the more ways you can wear one garment, the less garments you need to buy, and they are timeless, the opposite of disposable fashion. Both the traceability and sourcing of the raw materials used are important to Hesse, who uses only pure alpaca wool farmed sustainably within the UK – resulting in luxuriously soft and hardwearing fibres. The resulting garments are beautiful and wearable, and most importantly have been created to last a lifetime.

handheadheart2Handheadheart collection image, courtesy of Anna Maria Hesse.

I was impressed with both the concept and design behind Julia Crew’s collection of man bags labelled i.did.nee.ken (taken from the Scottish colloquialism meaning ‘I didn’t know’). Taking a threefold approach to the design process, Julia has ensured each product fits the criteria of a) durable design b) responsible sourcing and c) sustainable lifestyle. Essentially the bags are made to last, they have a low environmental impact and they can be used as part of a sustainable lifestyle. Designed with the concerns and requirements of a cyclist in mind, the i.did.nee.ken accessories are urban, utilitarian, and feature beautiful soft leather combined with waxed canvas, with graphical touches such as the reflective material around zips – ticking every box a cyclist could ask for.

backpackBackpack courtesy of Julia Crew, photographer Sally Cole.

Another project that interested me was that of Energy Water Fashion. With an aim to create directional garments made from lovely fabrics such as Lamb’s wool and Merino, Energy Water Fashion creates garments that are naturally odour resistant therefore requiring less washing and general maintenance. The designer, Emma Rigby’s environmental concerns relate to the exorbitant figures regarding how much water we use in laundering our clothes (mentioned at length in Amelia’s magazines coverage of the LCF Centre for Sustainable Fashion’s Fashioning The Future Awards, where Emma Won the prestigious award in the Water category). Successfully designing a capsule wardrobe that offers real solutions in reducing our water consumption, there seems no end to Emma’s talents.

P2012385Emma Rigby presentation, photographed by Rachael Oku.

By staging exhibitions like this for the public, it’s good to know that Fashion colleges and indeed designers alike are addressing the need to develop more sustainable, less environmentally impacting methods. There are now a growing number of fashion labels devoted to seeking out cleaner, greener processes, which is great to see. I am continually impressed by two companies in particular whose truly sustainable approach and great designs mean consumers don’t have to choose between looking good and staying true to their environmental conscience and ethics.

Outdoor lifestyle brand Howies produce simple, functional pieces and pay attention to the little details. They use only the best in organic cotton, hemp and sustainable materials such as Merino and Lamb’s wool. The second brand is fair-trade fashion label People Tree, who offer a wide range of affordable fashion forward garments with a continual offering of designer collaborations including Richard Nicholl, Jessica Ogden and Bora Aksu to name but a few. This season, to appeal to a younger audience Emma Watson of Harry Potter fame has collaborated on a range, of which I have my eye on the organic cotton blue and white stripe Breton top (only £25!).

breton-stripe-topBreton stripe top by People Tree, image courtesy of PR shots.

So, until these talented, forward thinking MA graduates gain backing and start producing their collections for real, there are options – getting less limited by the day.
The inaugural round of graduates from London College of Fashion’s new MA course entitled Fashion and the Environment, sildenafil exhibited their findings this weekend within the Southbank Centre’s Queen Elizabeth Hall.

P2012400Image courtesy of Rachael Oku depicting the work of Shibin Vasudevan.

The students have taken a variety of approaches to tackle their environmental concerns with the fashion industry, some more successful than others. I wasn’t totally convinced by the practicality and wearability of Shibin Vasudevan’s shirts made from the contents of a hoover bag, though they were very visually stimulating. I was really excited by a number of projects including Shibin’s as his idea was highly innovative.

handheadheartHandheadheart collection image, courtesy of Anna Maria Hesse.

Anna Maria Hesse utilised her background in knitwear and deep interest in sustainable fashion to produce a collection entitled ‘handheadheart’ that discourages consumerism. Her beautifully subtle, draped garments are made to be worn in a variety of ways – so a top is a dress is a skirt. Her thinking is thus: the more ways you can wear one garment, the less garments you need to buy, and they are timeless, the opposite of disposable fashion. Both the traceability and sourcing of the raw materials used are important to Hesse, who uses only pure alpaca wool farmed sustainably within the UK – resulting in luxuriously soft and hardwearing fibres. The resulting garments are beautiful and wearable, and most importantly have been created to last a lifetime.

handheadheart2Handheadheart collection image, courtesy of Anna Maria Hesse.

I was impressed with both the concept and design behind Julia Crew’s collection of man bags labelled i.did.nee.ken (taken from the Scottish colloquialism meaning ‘I didn’t know’). Taking a threefold approach to the design process, Julia has ensured each product fits the criteria of a) durable design b) responsible sourcing and c) sustainable lifestyle. Essentially the bags are made to last, they have a low environmental impact and they can be used as part of a sustainable lifestyle. Designed with the concerns and requirements of a cyclist in mind, the i.did.nee.ken accessories are urban, utilitarian, and feature beautiful soft leather combined with waxed canvas, with graphical touches such as the reflective material around zips – ticking every box a cyclist could ask for.

backpackBackpack courtesy of Julia Crew, photographer Sally Cole.

Another project that interested me was that of Energy Water Fashion. With an aim to create directional garments made from lovely fabrics such as Lamb’s wool and Merino, Energy Water Fashion creates garments that are naturally odour resistant therefore requiring less washing and general maintenance. The designer, Emma Rigby’s environmental concerns relate to the exorbitant figures regarding how much water we use in laundering our clothes (mentioned at length in Amelia’s magazines coverage of the LCF Centre for Sustainable Fashion’s Fashioning The Future Awards, where Emma Won the prestigious award in the Water category). Successfully designing a capsule wardrobe that offers real solutions in reducing our water consumption, there seems no end to Emma’s talents.

P2012385Emma Rigby presentation, photographed by Rachael Oku.

By staging exhibitions like this for the public, it’s good to know that Fashion colleges and indeed designers alike are addressing the need to develop more sustainable, less environmentally impacting methods. There are now a growing number of fashion labels devoted to seeking out cleaner, greener processes, which is great to see. I am continually impressed by two companies in particular whose truly sustainable approach and great designs mean consumers don’t have to choose between looking good and staying true to their environmental conscience and ethics.

Outdoor lifestyle brand Howies produce simple, functional pieces and pay attention to the little details. They use only the best in organic cotton, hemp and sustainable materials such as Merino and Lamb’s wool. The second brand is fair-trade fashion label People Tree, who offer a wide range of affordable fashion forward garments with a continual offering of designer collaborations including Richard Nicholl, Jessica Ogden and Bora Aksu to name but a few. This season, to appeal to a younger audience Emma Watson of Harry Potter fame has collaborated on a range, of which I have my eye on the organic cotton blue and white stripe Breton top (only £25!).

breton-stripe-topBreton stripe top by People Tree, image courtesy of PR shots.

So, until these talented, forward thinking MA graduates gain backing and start producing their collections for real, there are options – getting less limited by the day.
The inaugural round of graduates from London College of Fashion’s new MA course entitled Fashion and the Environment, mind exhibited their findings this weekend within the Southbank Centre’s Queen Elizabeth Hall.

P2012400Image courtesy of Rachael Oku depicting the work of Shibin Vasudevan.

The students have taken a variety of approaches to tackle their environmental concerns with the fashion industry, some more successful than others. I wasn’t totally convinced by the practicality and wearability of Shibin Vasudevan’s shirts made from the contents of a hoover bag, though they were very visually stimulating. I was really excited by a number of projects including Shibin’s as his idea was highly innovative.

handheadheartHandheadheart collection image, courtesy of Anna Maria Hesse.

Anna Maria Hesse utilised her background in knitwear and deep interest in sustainable fashion to produce a collection entitled ‘handheadheart’ that discourages consumerism. Her beautifully subtle, draped garments are made to be worn in a variety of ways – so a top is a dress is a skirt. Her thinking is thus: the more ways you can wear one garment, the less garments you need to buy, and they are timeless, the opposite of disposable fashion. Both the traceability and sourcing of the raw materials used are important to Hesse, who uses only pure alpaca wool farmed sustainably within the UK – resulting in luxuriously soft and hardwearing fibres. The resulting garments are beautiful and wearable, and most importantly have been created to last a lifetime.

handheadheart2Handheadheart collection image, courtesy of Anna Maria Hesse.

I was impressed with both the concept and design behind Julia Crew’s collection of man bags labelled i.did.nee.ken (taken from the Scottish colloquialism meaning ‘I didn’t know’). Taking a threefold approach to the design process, Julia has ensured each product fits the criteria of a) durable design b) responsible sourcing and c) sustainable lifestyle. Essentially the bags are made to last, they have a low environmental impact and they can be used as part of a sustainable lifestyle. Designed with the concerns and requirements of a cyclist in mind, the i.did.nee.ken accessories are urban, utilitarian, and feature beautiful soft leather combined with waxed canvas, with graphical touches such as the reflective material around zips – ticking every box a cyclist could ask for.

backpackBackpack courtesy of Julia Crew, photographer Sally Cole.

Another project that interested me was that of Energy Water Fashion. With an aim to create directional garments made from lovely fabrics such as Lamb’s wool and Merino, Energy Water Fashion creates garments that are naturally odour resistant therefore requiring less washing and general maintenance. The designer, Emma Rigby’s environmental concerns relate to the exorbitant figures regarding how much water we use in laundering our clothes (mentioned at length in Amelia’s magazines coverage of the LCF Centre for Sustainable Fashion’s Fashioning The Future Awards, where Emma Won the prestigious award in the Water category). Successfully designing a capsule wardrobe that offers real solutions in reducing our water consumption, there seems no end to Emma’s talents.

P2012385Emma Rigby presentation, photographed by Rachael Oku.

By staging exhibitions like this for the public, it’s good to know that Fashion colleges and indeed designers alike are addressing the need to develop more sustainable, less environmentally impacting methods. There are now a growing number of fashion labels devoted to seeking out cleaner, greener processes, which is great to see. I am continually impressed by two companies in particular whose truly sustainable approach and great designs mean consumers don’t have to choose between looking good and staying true to their environmental conscience and ethics.

Outdoor lifestyle brand Howies produce simple, functional pieces and pay attention to the little details. They use only the best in organic cotton, hemp and sustainable materials such as Merino and Lamb’s wool. The second brand is fair-trade fashion label People Tree, who offer a wide range of affordable fashion forward garments with a continual offering of designer collaborations including Richard Nicholl, Jessica Ogden and Bora Aksu to name but a few. This season, to appeal to a younger audience Emma Watson of Harry Potter fame has collaborated on a range, of which I have my eye on the organic cotton blue and white stripe Breton top (only £25!).

breton-stripe-topBreton stripe top by People Tree, image courtesy of PR shots.

So, until these talented, forward thinking MA graduates gain backing and start producing their collections for real, there are options – getting less limited by the day.
espalier tree fruit
Illustration by Vanessa Morris

Planting trees is EXHILERATING! So so underrated. Last Saturday I was gardening for the first time in my life at the Community Orchards project, online organised by BTCV’s Carbon Army and managed by Camden Council.  I mentioned the project briefly in my Green Gyms feature a couple of weeks ago.  BTCV have 22 dates scheduled to plant ten orchards in housing estates and sheltered housing across Camden. The project’s aim is to promote local interest in food growing and provide the opportunity for community groups to develop communal gardening projects. Gardening and growing your own food is great, prostate as I discovered, find and it doesn’t only have to be for people with their own gardens.
CIMG3845

Smiles all round.  Photo by Chris Speirs.

I went along last Saturday to Taplow Estate in Camden, to witness how the scheme works. Feeling rather worse for wear, I was convinced I’d only stay for an hour or two and then go home to sleep. Being hung-over does not exactly get you in the mood for planting community gardens. Or so I thought. Fast forward to four hours later, and I was feeling energised, ridiculously happy, surrounded by great people, and I’d planted the first tree I’ve ever planted IN MY LIFE! Everyone should try this truly underrated source of pure joy at least once in their lives, however hippy you may previously have thought that sounds. Do it in the name of food democracy, fitness, and plain old happiness. I mean it.
CIMG3839

Photo: Zofia Walczak

My first task after I’d met the group of 20-or-so volunteers, who were already busy at work, was to help in the removing of turf from one side of the green area. After this the soil was turned over and mixed with compost to get it ready for planting seeds. It is unbelievable how clueless I felt when I was given a huge heavy spade. Yes, a spade. That humble tool you’d think you’d know how to use. The others were quick to help me though and within two hours I went from total cluelessness to being able to plant a cherry tree, by myself!! My arms and back once again felt like they were getting the best workout they’ve ever had. Goodbye push-ups and weights, hello spades, forks and hoes.
CIMG3841

Photo: Zofia Walczak

Lunch was served to us by residents of the estate: delicious homemade soup and fresh baguette. I spoke to one resident, Ian, who explained that the orchard is being created on previously unused green space. He’d been pushing for the creation of garden space on the estate for four years, looking for funding, and is glad the scheme is now finally up and running. Using Taplow Estate in Camden as an example, the local gardening club are already working together to apply for grants to improve other under-utilised green spaces on the estate, and BTCV hope to be able to come back later in the year to give them a helping hand.

CIMG3846

Photo: Chris Speirs

The Community Orchards project is being managed by Camden Council, and BTCV’s Carbon Army have been commissioned to co-ordinate and facilitate the events. Camden Council have been canvassing local interest, with the key pre-requisite being that local residents take ownership of their new orchard. The Carbon Army are focusing on engaging as many residents from the local communities as possible in the preparation and planting. Local residents will also be offered follow-up training to ensure they know how to care for, prune and make the most of their new local food resource.

If you want to go along to the next session, check out the website and sign up, everyone is welcome. You won’t regret it one bit, especially on a groggy Saturday morning.
Planting trees is EXHILERATING! So so underrated. Last Saturday I was gardening for the first time in my life with Carbon Army’s Community Orchards project, drugs which I mentioned in my Green Gyms feature a couple of weeks ago. BTCV (the British Trust for Conservation Volunteers) have 22 dates scheduled to plant ten orchards in housing estates and sheltered housing across Camden. The project’s aim is to promote local interest in food growing and provide the opportunity for community groups to develop communal gardening projects. Gardening and growing your own food is great, approved as I discovered, and it doesn’t only have to be for people with their own gardens.

I went along last Saturday to Taplow Estate in Camden, to witness how the scheme works. Feeling rather worse for wear, I was convinced I’d only stay for an hour or two and then go home to sleep. Being hung-over does not exactly get you in the mood for planting community gardens. Or so I thought. Fast forward to four hours later, and I was feeling energised, ridiculously happy, surrounded by great people, and I’d planted the first tree I’ve ever planted IN MY LIFE! Everyone should try this truly underrated source of pure joy at least once in their lives, however hippy you may previously have thought that sounds. Do it in the name of food democracy, fitness, and plain old happiness. I mean it.

My first task after I’d met the group of 20-or-so volunteers, who were already busy at work, was to help in the removing of turf from one side of the green area. After this the soil was turned over and mixed with compost to get it ready for planting seeds. It is unbelievable how clueless I felt when I was given a huge heavy spade. Yes, a spade. That humble tool you’d think you’d know how to use. The others were quick to help me though and within two hours I went from total cluelessness to being able to plant a cherry tree, by myself!! My arms and back once again felt like they were getting the best workout they’ve ever had. Goodbye push-ups and weights, hello spades, forks and hoes.

Lunch was served to us by residents of the estate: delicious homemade soup and fresh baguette. I spoke to one resident, Ian, who explained that the Orchard is being created on previously unused green space. He’d been pushing for the creation of garden space on the estate for four years, looking for funding, and is glad the scheme is now finally up and running. Using Taplow Estate in Camden as an example, the local gardening club are already working together to apply for grants to improve other under-utilised green spaces on the estate, and BTCV hope to be able to come back later in the year to give them a helping hand.

The Community Orchards project is being managed by Camden Council, and BTCV’s Carbon Army have been commissioned to co-ordinate and facilitate the events. Camden Council have been canvassing local interest, with the key pre-requisite being that local residents take ownership of their new orchard. The Carbon Army are focusing on engaging as many residents from the local communities as possible in the preparation and planting. Local residents will also be offered follow-up training to ensure they know how to care for, prune and make the most of their new local food resource.

If you want to go along to the next session, check out the website and sign up, everyone is welcome. I definitely recommend it, you won’t regret it one bit, especially on a groggy Saturday morning.

As the American teeny popper Jesse McCartney sang in 2004′s ‘Beautiful Soul’: ‘I don’t want another pretty face/ I don’t want just anyone to hold/ I don’t want my love to go to waste/ I want you and your beautiful soul’.

collections-mainThe Miss Butterfly collection (SS10), salve imagery throughout courtesy of Beautiful Soul.

If only London-based designer Nicola Woods had created her label Beautiful Soul back then, ambulance he’d have realised you can have the eponymous as well as the aesthetic quality. Indeed, this is less about a label being ethical – although, of course that matters greatly – so much as the fact it would be a travesty for Beautiful Soul not to up-cycle some of the gorgeous vintage kimonos and saris which it makes use of. As it is, Woods was at that time in the midst of an 11 year career as an insurance broker, after which she won a place at the London College of Fashion.

Celebrating its first birthday this month, Beautiful Soul was born of Nichola’s invitation to spend summer 2008 in South Africa with community-focussed charity, Tabeisa. While there, she helped establish a small cooperative, Umdoni Creek, from whom she sources the embellishments and accessories for Beautiful Soul.

Rei coatRei Coat, taken from Smallprint collection AW09/10).

Once back in London, the garments are produced by a registered women’s project. Beautiful Soul’s debut A/W 09 collection ‘Smallprint’ included Fair Trade cotton and satin and jersey made from sustainable bamboo alongside up-cycled kimono fabric from the 1940s. Swathes of fabric in muted, patterned materials are gathered into rouching, and structured collars add definition to compelling silhouettes. The collection precipitated a run of awards, including Ethical Fashion Forum’s Innovation Award in February 2009 and more recently the brand won a Future 100s Budding Entrepreneur on the Horizon 2009 recognition.

Yoshie CoatYoshie Coat, taken from Smallprint collection AW09/10).

Beautiful soul’s critically acclaimed second collection ‘Miss Butterfly’, was shown at London Fashion Week’s Estethica with a more colourful direction. Each style in the Madame Butterfly-inspired S/S 10 collection is named after a famous Japanese geisha; Korin is a turquoise shift evocative of a waterfall, the Satoka coat is a fabric-heavy shrug while the Mineko skirt is a structural dream with high, thick waistband and tulip gathering at the hem.

Miss Butterfly Promotional 3Izuko blouse and Kimie skirt taken from the Miss Butterfly collection (SS10).

Nichola believes Beautiful Soul’s target audience to be women ‘aware of the importance of originality and quality in a garment, relishing also the story behind each creation’. It’s a formula which has proved popular, as this spring Beautiful Soul adds the V&A to its list of stockists, which also includes Ascension Boutique and Junky Styling. Not bad, we’re sure you’ll agree, for a one-time city insurance broker.

Miss Butterfly Promotional 2Kimina dress and Cio Cio coat taken from the Miss Butterfly collection (SS10).

Categories ,Ali Schofield, ,Ascension Boutique, ,Beautiful Soul, ,estethica, ,Ethical Fashion Forum, ,Future 100s Budding Entrepreneur on the Horizon 2009, ,Jesse McCartney, ,Junky Styling, ,London College of Fashion, ,London Fashion Week’, ,Madame Butterfly, ,Nicola Woods, ,Tabeisa, ,Umdoni Creek, ,va

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Amelia’s Magazine | An Evening of Retro Hollywood Glamour at the Victoria & Albert Museum


Mumford & Sons illustration by Lana Hughes

5. Mumford & Sons
Mumford & Sons have had a special piece in my heart for a couple of years now. Having played their debut to death and enjoyed their live shows just as much, ampoule the band never fail to disappoint. When they arrived at the NME/Radio 1 Tent they packed out the space and the surrounding areas had hundreds of fans trying to capture the performance.

Despite not being able to see the band or even hear them over the crowd singing along, shop I still had hairs on my neck shooting up. I felt quite proud of the most modest band around who could not have put more effort in. They were made for moments like this. ‘Little Lion Man’ had never sounded so perfect and the new songs were greeted with the same enthusiasm from the crowd.


Weezer illustration by Natsuki Otani

4. Weezer
Sunday evening, abortion there was a chill in the air, ‘nu metal’ pioneers Limp Bizit had been and gone, the heavy rain had done the same. American geek rockers Weezer brought the sun to the main-stage along with a greatest hits set. They are a band I would never choose the listen to but I wouldn’t turn them off either.

Along with the classics, ‘Buddy Holly’, ‘Hash Pipe’ and ‘Beverly Hills’ the old timers covered Wheatus’ ‘Teenage Dirtbag’, MGMT’s ‘Kids’ and Lady GaGa’s ‘Pokerface’ where energetic front-man Rivers Cuomo sported a blonde wig whilst rolling about in the mud.


Mystery Jets illustration by Antonia Makes

3. Mystery Jets
Mystery Jets have been knocking about for sometime now with a collection of pop songs that would give Simon Cowell’s song-writing team a fright. Today wasn’t just about the hits, it was to see if the band could work main-stage after a few appearances on the smaller ones previously.

Not only did they get some sing-a-longs from the crowd but also got them dancing when Count & Sinden joined the band to play the party tune of the year, ‘After Dark’. It wasn’t just the stage that the band controlled as the lively band members spent a decent about of time amongst the crowd too.


The Libertines illustrated by Abi Daker

2. The Libertines
2002, the NME. Radio 1 Tent saw Peter Doherty, Carl Barat, John Hassall and Gary Powell play their only Reading Festival together. Since then The Libertines have performed twice without Peter, and since the group disbanded six years ago they have all appeared under different guises.

The main-stage witnessed the band play just their forth gig since their recent reformation. It was professional and energetic. I don’t think I have ever seen the band play that well; they meant business. Talk was kept to a minimum whilst thrashing out tune after tune, they were unfazed when they had to have a quick break whilst the crowd calmed down. A tear was shed when Pete and Carl, hugged and kissed onstage, I had been waiting too long for that moment.


Libertines illustration by Miss Pearl Grey aka Kellie B.


Arcade Fire, illustration by Jenny Robins.

1. Arcade Fire
It was Arcade Fire’s last Reading Festival performance that really won me over. Win Butler lead the seven piece on a emphatic set that included songs from all three records but it was the material from their latest, The Suburbs that really had the wow factor. Words struggle to some up this performance, it was more than just music, more like a religion.

Many thanks to our illustrators. Thumbnail illustration of Weezer by Julie Lee

Delorean by Clare Delaney

Opening on Wednesday, buy information pills PayneShurvell (in association with the anti-design festival) are for four weeks, buy holding four, visit this four day exhibitions. Titled 4×4, the gallery’s first show (Dream’s of Desire) curated by James Payne features artist Clare Delaney.

The gallery doors currently find themselves nestled between two cars customised by Clare for the Liverpool Biennale 5 and 6. The biennale sponsors appearance on the cars mimic the advertisers stack usually associated with F1, the spoilers added by the artist subvert a family car into those more usually seen running around F3 race tracks.

Upon entering PayneShurvell the viewer is greeted by the framed remnants of Delauney’s most recent performance. These beautifully presented receipts document an interaction between the artist and several unaware cashiers of major London Galleries. The act of consumerism encouraged within a gallery space is made apparent by the act of deciding and controlling the order Clare’s purchases passed through the tills .

Sensation by Clare Delaney

By presenting the receipts within frames along the crisp white walls of an exhibition space, the viewer is provided with the opportunity to reconsider the ‘everydayness’ usually associated with a receipt. Instead there is the time to muse over the thought, that (as discussed by James Payne in an introductory tour) at some point a designer would have been required to design the layout in accordance to the individual Galleries requirements.

This Wedneday (8th September) PayneShurvell will be open from 6-8 and Clare Delaney’s Dreams of Desire will be showing until Saturday 11th September.

Wednesday 15th September: sees the opening of an exhibition curated by Dermot O’Brien exploring the use of text and typography.

Ian Whittlesea, ‘Sol Sans Typeface’

Wednesday 22nd September: Edward Vince presents Matthew Robinson and himself in ‘How Am I Not Myself’.

325 by Edward Vince

Week four opens on the 29th September with the gallery transformed by the requirements of sound art in the last exhibition ‘Silencer’ curated by Mark Jackson. This exhibition will include ‘Not Playing,’ Corrado Morgana’s handicapped helicopter which despite the players best attempt will never take over. Lastly this show will include Audio Research Editions’ ‘Real English Tea Made Here,’ a sound piece which includes tapes by Willam S. Burroughs previously unheard in the UK.

Amelia’s Magazine had the pleasure of visiting a PayneShurvell preview of 4×4 on Friday and will be visiting the gallery each week to see how this ambitious project plays out. We recommend you do the same.

PayneShurvell: 16 Hewett Street, London, EC2A 3NN
4×4 runs from 6th September to 2nd October 2010.

Delorean by Clare Delaney

Opening on Wednesday, viagra approved PayneShurvell (in association with the anti-design festival) are for four weeks, seek holding four, four day exhibitions. Titled 4×4, the gallery’s first show (Dream’s of Desire) curated by James Payne features artist Clare Delaney.

The gallery doors currently find themselves nestled between two cars customised by Clare for the Liverpool Biennale 5 and 6. The biennale sponsors appearance on the cars mimic the advertisers stack usually associated with F1, the spoilers added by the artist subvert a family car into those more usually seen running around F3 race tracks.

Upon entering PayneShurvell the viewer is greeted by the framed remnants of Delauney’s most recent performance. These beautifully presented receipts document an interaction between the artist and several unaware cashiers of major London Galleries. The act of consumerism encouraged within a gallery space is made apparent by the act of deciding and controlling the order Clare’s purchases passed through the tills .

Sensation by Clare Delaney

By presenting the receipts within frames along the crisp white walls of an exhibition space, the viewer is provided with the opportunity to reconsider the ‘everydayness’ usually associated with a receipt. Instead there is the time to muse over the thought, that (as discussed by James Payne in an introductory tour) at some point a designer would have been required to design the layout in accordance to the individual Galleries requirements.

This Wedneday (8th September) PayneShurvell will be open from 6-8 and Clare Delaney’s Dreams of Desire will be showing until Saturday 11th September.

Wednesday 15th September: sees the opening of an exhibition curated by Dermot O’Brien exploring the use of text and typography.

Ian Whittlesea, ‘Sol Sans Typeface’

Wednesday 22nd September: Edward Vince presents Matthew Robinson and himself in ‘How Am I Not Myself’.

325 by Edward Vince

Week four opens on the 29th September with the gallery transformed by the requirements of sound art in the last exhibition ‘Silencer’ curated by Mark Jackson. This exhibition will include ‘Not Playing,’ Corrado Morgana’s handicapped helicopter which despite the players best attempt will never take over. Lastly this show will include Audio Research Editions’ ‘Real English Tea Made Here,’ a sound piece which includes tapes by Willam S. Burroughs previously unheard in the UK.

Amelia’s Magazine had the pleasure of visiting a PayneShurvell preview of 4×4 on Friday and will be visiting the gallery each week to see how this ambitious project plays out. We recommend you do the same.

PayneShurvell: 16 Hewett Street, London, EC2A 3NN
4×4 runs from 6th September to 2nd October 2010.

Delorean by Clare Delaney

4×4 the new exhibition at PayneShurvell opens on Wednesday, information pills in association with the anti-design festival. For four weeks, viagra dosage the gallery will be home to four seperate exhibitions each on view for four days only. The first show Clare Delaney’s Dream’s of Desire has been curated by James Payne.

The gallery doors find themselves nestled between two cars customised by Clare for the Liverpool Biennale 5 and 6. The biennale sponsors appearance on the cars mimic the advertisers stack usually associated with F1, the spoilers added by the artist subvert a family car into those more usually seen running around F3 race tracks.

Upon entering PayneShurvell the viewer is greeted by the framed remnants of Delauney’s most recent performance. These beautifully presented receipts document an interaction between the artist and several unaware cashiers of major London Galleries. The act of consumerism encouraged within a gallery space is made apparent by the act of deciding and controlling the order Clare’s purchases passed through the tills .

Sensation by Clare Delaney

By presenting the receipts within frames along the crisp white walls of an exhibition space, the viewer is provided with the opportunity to reconsider the ‘everydayness’ usually associated with a receipt. Instead there is the time to muse over the thought, that (as discussed by James Payne in an introductory tour) at some point a designer would have been required to design the layout in accordance to the individual Galleries requirements.

This Wedneday (8th September) PayneShurvell will be open from 6-8 and Clare Delaney’s Dreams of Desire will be showing until Saturday 11th September.

Wednesday 15th September: sees the opening of an exhibition curated by Dermot O’Brien exploring the use of text and typography.

Ian Whittlesea, ‘Sol Sans Typeface’

Wednesday 22nd September: Edward Vince presents Matthew Robinson and himself in ‘How Am I Not Myself’.

325 by Edward Vince

Week four opens on the 29th September with the gallery transformed by the requirements of sound art in the last exhibition ‘Silencer’ curated by Mark Jackson. This exhibition will include ‘Not Playing,’ Corrado Morgana’s handicapped helicopter which despite the players best attempt will never take over. Lastly this show will include Audio Research Editions’ ‘Real English Tea Made Here,’ a sound piece which includes tapes by Willam S. Burroughs previously unheard in the UK.

Amelia’s Magazine had the pleasure of visiting a PayneShurvell preview of 4×4 on Friday and will be visiting the gallery each week to see how this ambitious project plays out. We recommend you do the same.

PayneShurvell: 16 Hewett Street, London, EC2A 3NN
4×4 runs from 6th September to 2nd October 2010.

Delorean by Clare Delaney

4×4 the new exhibition at PayneShurvell opens on Wednesday, mind in association with the anti-design festival. For four weeks, this site the gallery will be home to four seperate exhibitions each on view for four days. The first has been curated by James Payne, features Clare Delaney’s Dream’s of Desire.

The gallery doors find themselves nestled between two cars customised by Clare for the Liverpool Biennale 5 and 6. The biennale sponsors appearance on the cars mimic the advertisers stack usually associated with F1, the spoilers added by the artist subvert a family car into those more usually seen running around F3 race tracks.

Upon entering PayneShurvell the viewer is greeted by the framed remnants of Delauney’s most recent performance. These beautifully presented receipts document an interaction between the artist and several unaware cashiers of major London Galleries. The act of consumerism encouraged within a gallery space is made apparent by the act of deciding and controlling the order Clare’s purchases passed through the tills .

Sensation by Clare Delaney

By presenting the receipts within frames along the crisp white walls of an exhibition space, the viewer is provided with the opportunity to reconsider the ‘everydayness’ usually associated with a receipt. Instead there is the time to muse over the thought, that (as discussed by James Payne in an introductory tour) at some point a designer would have been required to design the layout in accordance to the individual Galleries requirements.

This Wedneday (8th September) PayneShurvell will be open from 6-8 and Clare Delaney’s Dreams of Desire will be showing until Saturday 11th September.

Wednesday 15th September: sees the opening of an exhibition curated by Dermot O’Brien exploring the use of text and typography.

Ian Whittlesea, ‘Sol Sans Typeface’

Wednesday 22nd September: Edward Vince presents Matthew Robinson and himself in ‘How Am I Not Myself’.

325 by Edward Vince

Week four opens on the 29th September with the gallery transformed by the requirements of sound art in the last exhibition ‘Silencer’ curated by Mark Jackson. This exhibition will include ‘Not Playing,’ Corrado Morgana’s handicapped helicopter which despite the players best attempt will never take over. Lastly this show will include Audio Research Editions’ ‘Real English Tea Made Here,’ a sound piece which includes tapes by Willam S. Burroughs previously unheard in the UK.

Amelia’s Magazine had the pleasure of visiting a PayneShurvell preview of 4×4 on Friday and will be visiting the gallery each week to see how this ambitious project plays out. We recommend you do the same.

PayneShurvell: 16 Hewett Street, London, EC2A 3NN
4×4 runs from 6th September to 2nd October 2010.


Glamour at the V&A, no rx illustrated by Gabriel Ayala

It’s been a year for the bygone eras, view that’s for sure. First we had Vintage at Goodwood, then there’s an exhibition celebrating Horrockses 1950s style at the Fashion & Textile Museum, and now the V&A wants in on the action. Well it’s not strictly their first foray into the era; in fact it was all the way back in April that Grace Kelly: Style Icon hit down in London and has been fully booked ever since (well that’s how it seemed whenever I’ve tried to visit anyway.)


Illustration by Katherine Tromans

So what perfect timing for them to present…..drum roll please……an evening of “Retro Hollywood Glamour.” And it was at the end of August that I was whisked away to party with the likes of Alfred Hitchcock and Marilyn Monroe (metaphorically speaking) whilst the DJ spun the hits of yesteryear. All in all people were drinking champagne and were having a jolly spiffing time.

But probably the most spectacular aspect of the evening was the amount of people who committed and dressed up to the nines as their heroes. Men and women put on their most dapper suits and fullest skirts to party, and most made a pretty good job of it.


Illustration by Kellie Black

If you so fancied (and could cope with the queue!) your flowing locks could also be transformed into something quite spectacular (involving rollers and a lot of hairspray) and similarly a Hollywood makeover was available all within movie star tents boasting lighted mirrors in the grand entrance hall. The perfect way to complement your 1950s outfit and finally feel like a movie star.

And that wasn’t all for the events going on throughout the evening. Everything was thought of; from acting out radio plays, partaking in a screen printing workshop, doodling away with Daisy de Villeneuve or simply reminiscing over old movie trailers. Not bad for a night out at the museum.

As part of the Friday Lates this Summer at the V&A, it was a spectacular event. Maybe we can hope for the swinging 60s in the Autumn?

Retro Hollywood Glamour at the V&A: in Pictures






All photographs by Jemma Crow

Categories ,1950s, ,Alfred Hithcock, ,fashion, ,film, ,Gabriel Ayala, ,Glamour, ,Hollywood, ,Katherine Tromans, ,Kellie Black, ,london, ,Marilyn Monroe, ,retro, ,Silver screen, ,va, ,vintage

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